New World Cuisine: The Histories of Chocolate, Mate Y Más

This exhibition will tell the tale of the earliest cultural mestizaje (mixing) to take place in the Americas through food. The exhibition will highlight foods that originated in the New World and foods that were brought over from Europe via Spain and Asia via the Spanish Manila Galleons. Several special sections in the exhibition highlight specific food items. Two of these are chocolate and maté. The exhibition traces the origins of these two popular drinks, how they rose to popularity during the colonial period, and how they were introduced into European society and culture, and how they have become a strong component of popular culture today. More than 300 objects related to food harvesting, preparation, table settings, kitchen items and utilitarian and decorative implements will be highlighted to illustrate the rich culinary traditions of the Americas.

FUZE.SW 2013 Food+Folklore Festival November 8-10

“...James Beard Award-winning authors and chefs will gather with leading historians, archaeologists, cultural commentators, and folklorists to discuss and demonstrate how traditions and techniques have intersected to create a culinary tradition uniquely New Mexican”

An exploration of the dawn of world cuisine as we know—and consume it— today opened last year at the Museum of International Folk Art with New World Cuisine: The Histories of Chocolate, Mate y Más, on view through January 5, 2014.

Digging deeper into the topics covered in New World Cuisine will be FUZE.SW 2013. Santa Fe’s first-ever food conference of its kind takes place at the Museum of International Folk Art the weekend of November 8—10, 2013. James Beard Award-winning authors and chefs from across the US will gather with leading historians, archaeologists, cultural commentators, and folklorists to discuss and demonstrate how traditions and techniques from diverse heritages have intersected to create a culinary tradition uniquely New Mexican (and transported globally).

A series of talks, small breakout sessions, and panel discussions will delve into such areas as, “The Big Debate: Local Ingredients, Foreign Chefs,” “The Stories Cookbooks Tell: Cooking Culture,” “Recipes, Tales, and Traditions,” “Holy Mole: Chocolate—from Aztecs, to Chaco, to Hershey,” “North v. South: The Chile Wars.” These, and others, will be woven together by a series of artistic interludes, and keynotes by Dr. Jeffrey Pilcher (U Minnesota), Maricel Presilla, and Gustavo Arellano – and of course, food.

Festivities begin on the Friday afternoon when Bill and Cheryl Alters Jamison lead an optional cooking class at the Santa Fe School of Cooking on the beloved foods traditionally served during the holidays in New Mexico. The class is followed that evening by a festive opening reception hosted by the Santa Fe School of Cooking with delicious food, wine, entertainment—and the opportunity to meet and visit with the renowned guest speakers.

Artistic interludes, like the papel picado workshop and other hands-on activities throughout the conference as well as a breakfast burrito bonanza and a food truck brunch keep things light.


More Information and to Purchase Tickets

Tickets for the festival are $250, and $200 for Museum of New Mexico Foundation members. For tickets call (505) 476-1126.

FUSE.SW 2013 is sponsored by the Santa Fe School of Cooking, Museum Hill Café, Museum of International Folk Art, International Folk Art Foundation, Museum of New Mexico Foundation.

FUZE.SW 2013 SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, November 8, 2013

12-3 p.m.  New Mexico Holiday Traditions Class with Bill and Cheryl Alters Jamison, Santa Fe School of Cooking

5-7 p.m. Opening Night Cocktail Reception and Registration at the Santa Fe School of Cooking

7:30 p.m. Dine Around at your choice, Taberna, Restaurant Martín, Anaszi, La Boca                         

SATURDAY, November 9, 2103

8-9 a.m. Breakfast Burrito Bonanza at the Museum of International Folk Art

9 a.m. Welcome remarks by museum director Marsha Bol

9:15 a.m. Opening key note by Jeffery Pilcher

9:45 a.m. Artistic Interlude                                                         

10 a.m.  Break                                                  

10:15 a.m. Food Talks (15 min. each)

TALK: Dave DeWitt - History of Chiles
TALK: Cordelia Snow - Luxury Goods on the Camino Real             
TALK: Carmella Padilla with Don Usner - Growing up around the kitchen table with chiles                             
11:15 a.m. Mid-day key note by Maricel Presilla

12 p.m. Artistic Interlude with storyteller Nasario Garcia

12:15 p.m. New World Cuisine lunch catered by Museum Hill Café with concurrent tours of the New World Cuisine exhibition, papel picado workshop with Catalina Delgado Trunk, and author book signings

2 p.m. Breakout Panel Discussions

Topic: Folklore & Food: Fabiola Cabezza de Baca, Doris Rudnick in conversation with Thomas C’de Baca
Topic: North v South: The Chile Wars, Carmella Padilla moderator with Dave DeWitt, Paul Bosland, Maricel Presilla, and Estevan Arellano
Topic: The Big Debate: Local Ingredients, Foreign Chefs, and the Question of Culinary Cannibalism, Rob DeWalt moderator with Jeffrey Pilcher, Gustavo Arellano, Maricel Presilla, and John Sedlar        
3 p.m. A James Campbell Caruso tapas y mas break

3:15 p.m. Breakout Panels Discussion                                   

Topic: New Mexico’s Favorite Indulgence: Frito Pies, Rocky Durham moderator with Dave DeWitt, Paul Bosland, and Estevan Arellano
Topic: Cooking Culture: Recipes, Tales and Traditions, Cheryl Alters Jamison moderator with Juan José Bochenski, Martín Rios, and Carmella Padilla                                            
Topic: New Twists on Old World Traditions, Rob DeWalt moderator with John Sedlar, Gustavo Arellano, Jeffrey Pilcher, and Tina Ujlaki (invited)              
4:15 p.m. Wrap up for the day

6 p.m. Santa Fe Culinary Academy Cocktail and Tasting Party, New Mexico distilled spirits provided by Santa Fe Spirits and delectable bites by Chef Rocky

7:30 p.m. Dine Around at your choice, Taberna, Restaurant Martín, Anaszi, La Boca                         

SUNDAY, November 10, 2013

8-9 a.m. Breakfast at hotel

9 a.m. Welcome by Cheryl Alters Jamison

9:15 a.m. Key note by Jeffery Pilcher

9:45 a.m. Artistic Interlude                                                         

10 a.m. Break                                                   

10:15 a.m. Food Talks (15 min)

TALK: Deborah Madison – Heirloom and seasonal vegetables in New Mexico
TALK: Patricia Crown – What was unearthed after the Chaco discovery?
TALK and TASTING: Juan José Boschenski's mate ceremony and food pairing  
11:15-1 p.m. Food Truck Brunch with concurrent tours of the New World Cuisine exhibition, papel picado workshop with Catalina Delgado Trunk, and author book signings

1 p.m.  Breakout Panel Discussions

Topic: Stories Cookbooks Tell, Dave DeWitt moderator with Cheryl Alters Jamison, Deborah Madison, Elizabeth Titus, James Campbell Caruso, and Tina Ujlaki (invited)                                
Topic: Holy Mole: Chocolate; Aztecs, Chaco, Hershey, Nicolasa Chávez moderator with Patricia Crown, Maricel Presilla, Tony Bennett, and Rocky Durham
2 p.m. Break                                     

2:15 p.m. Artistic Interlude

2:30 p.m. Closing key note by Gustavo Arellano

3:15 p.m. Closing remarks by Cheryl Alters Jamison

Please note: Schedule subject to last minute changes.

New World Cuisine: The Histories of Chocolate, Mate y Más

“...On view are more than 300 objects from the museum’s vast collection of historical culinary items”

An exploration of the dawn of world cuisine as we know—and consume—it today opens December 7, 2012 at the Museum of International Folk Art with New World Cuisine: The Histories of Chocolate, Mate Y Más. The exhibition runs through January 4, 2014.

New World Cuisine explores how foods around the world developed from mixing the old and the new, and how many of the tastiest dishes and desserts came to be associated with New Mexico.

The mixing of peoples and foods—the fusion of cultures and traditions referred to as mestizaje—began in August 1598 when Juan de Oñate’s 500-strong expedition of soldiers, families, and Franciscan friars settled in New Mexico.

But the ingredients for change were tossed into the melting pot a century before by Christopher Columbus when foods from the Old World were mixed with those of the new and brought improvements from farm to table.

The Old World gained new staple crops, including potatoes, sweet potatoes, maize, and cassava. Tomatoes, chili peppers, cacao, peanuts, and pineapples also were introduced, and some became culinary centerpieces in many Old World countries: the tomato in Mediterranean countries Italy, Greece, and Spain; the chili pepper in India, Korea, Thailand, and China, via the Philippines; and paprika made from chili peppers, in Hungary.

On view are more than 300 objects objects from the museum’s vast collection of historical culinary items related to food harvesting, preparation, table settings, and utilitarian and decorative implements. Some examples are Asian and European spice jars retrofitted with intricately detailed locking metal lids in Mexico City to protect a household’s cacao from thieves; traditional pottery cooking vessels reimagined by metal smiths using hammered copper to accommodate the molinillo used to froth chocolate; talavera kitchen and tableware modeled after Chinese import porcelains; fine antique and contemporary silverware from Europe and the Americas. All provide insight into the importance placed on crafting exquisite food vessels and implements—and that you are what you eat with.

“It’s such a fabulous history,” curator Nicolasa Chávez said. “We’re borrowing one little teeny tiny pottery sherd from Chaco Canyon that was tested for theobroma (chocolate’s scientific name). I wanted that in the exhibit to really bring home to New Mexico that we’ve had a 1,000-year-old love affair with chocolate.”

The exhibition, which remains open through January 5, 2014, is about cultural heritage, nourishment, and regeneration—perfect subjects to begin a New Year.