acequia and clouds
","teaser_raw":"
 
\r\n","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e57","categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2ef","blog":"magazine","title":"May 1947","_title_sort":"may 1947","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.569Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.575Z","_totalPosts":1,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2ef","slug":"may-1947","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-1947/58b4b2404c2774661570f2ef/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-1947/58b4b2404c2774661570f2ef/#comments","totalPosts":1},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0","blog":"magazine","title":"May 2014","_title_sort":"may 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.576Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.581Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0","slug":"may-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0/#comments","totalPosts":16}],"teaser":"
 
\r\n","description":" ","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f97a","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/our-back-pages-may-2014-85855/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/our-back-pages-may-2014-85855/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/our-back-pages-may-2014-85855/","metaTitle":"Our Back Pages","metaDescription":"
 
\r\n","cleanDescription":" ","publish_start_moment":"2014-05-06T12:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:56:12.340Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f979","title":"One of Our 50 Is Missing","slug":"one-of-our-50-is-missing-85853","publish_start":"2014-05-06T12:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0","58b4b2404c2774661570f30b","58b4b2404c2774661570f267"],"tags_ids":["59090d72e1efff4c9916fab3","59090de2e1efff4c9916fafb","59090c10e1efff4c9916f95a"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_tagline":"Rueful anecdotes about New Mexico's mistaken geographical identity, since 1970.","created":"2014-05-06T12:02:17.000Z","legacy_id":"85853","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"one of our 50 is missing","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.866Z","active":true,"description_raw":"
Send Us Your Story—Please!
\r\n
\r\nDear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from there. Submissions will be edited for style and space. Please include your name, hometown, and state. E-mail to fifty@nmmagazine.com, or mail to Fifty, New Mexico Magazine, 495 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501.
\r\n\r\n

ONE OF OUR DISHES IS MISSING
\r\nWhen Bernie Crum’s school-age daughter was assigned to write a report about a U.S. state, she picked New Mexico. She wrote about foods common to New Mexico that are different than those in her home state of Missouri. Along with the wide use of chiles, she also mentioned that she loved sopaipillas. When the teacher returned her paper to her, she had crossed out sopaipillas and wrote in soup and peas. Are teachers using auto-correct these days, or what?

\r\n\r\n

TREES, PLEASE!
\r\nKenneth Robertson of Clovis learned something new when trying to order trees for his new orchard business over the phone. “We are not allowed to ship some kinds of trees to foreign countries,” the person said. Robertson tried to explain that New Mexico is part of the United States, but eventually just asked her to ship the trees 10 miles away to his coworker, who
\r\nlived in Farwell, Texas. She was happy to oblige.

\r\n\r\n

NO ACCESS ZONE
\r\nThis Olympics year reminded Don Bishop of Silver Cliff, Colorado, of his thwarted quest to buy tickets to the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. When he called to order them, the woman on the phone asked where he was born. He said, “Logan, New Mexico.” She informed Bishop that he would need to contact the Mexican embassy.

\r\n\r\n

BAD EXCHANGE RATE
\r\nMartha Siegling Luke of Citrus Heights, California, likes to bring gifts back whenever she visits her home state of New Mexico. She gave a jar of salsa from Chimayó to her coworker, and told her a little bit about the history of Chimayó’s Santuario and the state. “I asked if she had ever been to visit New Mexico. She said no, but she wanted to someday. She then asked if I had to pay in pesos.” Martha told her, “I didn’t go to Mexico, I went to New Mexico … next to Arizona.” Her coworker said, “I know, but did you have to pay in pesos?”

\r\n\r\n

TRANSACTION DECLINED
\r\nNiranjan Khalsa, formerly a corporate purchaser for a large security firm in Española, ran into trouble when attempting to place a sizable equipment order from a New York vendor. When she gave the clerk her address, the woman said, “Oh, I’m so sorry, ma’am, but I’ll have to cancel your order. We don’t ship overseas.” Khalsa said, “I then explained that the large expanse of land between Texas and Arizona is actually a state called New Mexico, and would qualify as domestic for shipping purposes.”

\r\n\r\n

HABLA IGLESIA?
\r\nPaul Garson, of Garson’s Religious Goods in the Duke City, received a referral recently from one of his British church-goods suppliers. The agent requested that a Honduran church “Try the shop in Mexico, they should be able to help,” and then listed the Albuquerque address of Garson’s store. “This is not the first time we’ve been confused with Arizona and Mexico,” Garson said.

","teaser_raw":"
Send Us Your Story—Please!

Dear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from
","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e60","categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0","blog":"magazine","title":"May 2014","_title_sort":"may 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.576Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.581Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0","slug":"may-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0/#comments","totalPosts":16},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f30b","blog":"magazine","title":"One Of Our 50 Is Missing","_title_sort":"one of our 50 is missing","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.592Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.600Z","_totalPosts":68,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f30b","slug":"one-of-our-50-is-missing","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/one-of-our-50-is-missing/58b4b2404c2774661570f30b/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/one-of-our-50-is-missing/58b4b2404c2774661570f30b/#comments","totalPosts":68}],"teaser":"
Send Us Your Story—Please!

Dear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from
","description":"Send Us Your Story—Please! Dear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from there. Submissions will be edited for style and space. Please include your name, hometown, and state. E-mail to fifty@nmmagazine.com, or mail to Fifty, New Mexico Magazine , 495 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501. ONE OF OUR DISHES IS MISSING When Bernie Crum’s school-age daughter was assigned to write a report about a U.S. state, she picked New Mexico. She wrote about foods common to New Mexico that are different than those in her home state of Missouri. Along with the wide use of chiles, she also mentioned that she loved sopaipillas. When the teacher returned her paper to her, she had crossed out sopaipillas and wrote in soup and peas . Are teachers using auto-correct these days, or what? TREES, PLEASE! Kenneth Robertson of Clovis learned something new when trying to order trees for his new orchard business over the phone. “We are not allowed to ship some kinds of trees to foreign countries,” the person said. Robertson tried to explain that New Mexico is part of the United States, but eventually just asked her to ship the trees 10 miles away to his coworker, who lived in Farwell, Texas. She was happy to oblige. NO ACCESS ZONE This Olympics year reminded Don Bishop of Silver Cliff, Colorado, of his thwarted quest to buy tickets to the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. When he called to order them, the woman on the phone asked where he was born. He said, “Logan, New Mexico.” She informed Bishop that he would need to contact the Mexican embassy. BAD EXCHANGE RATE Martha Siegling Luke of Citrus Heights, California, likes to bring gifts back whenever she visits her home state of New Mexico. She gave a jar of salsa from Chimayó to her coworker, and told her a little bit about the history of Chimayó’s Santuario and the state. “I asked if she had ever been to visit New Mexico. She said no, but she wanted to someday. She then asked if I had to pay in pesos.” Martha told her, “I didn’t go to Mexico, I went to New Mexico … next to Arizona.” Her coworker said, “I know, but did you have to pay in pesos?” TRANSACTION DECLINED Niranjan Khalsa, formerly a corporate purchaser for a large security firm in Española, ran into trouble when attempting to place a sizable equipment order from a New York vendor. When she gave the clerk her address, the woman said, “Oh, I’m so sorry, ma’am, but I’ll have to cancel your order. We don’t ship overseas.” Khalsa said, “I then explained that the large expanse of land between Texas and Arizona is actually a state called New Mexico, and would qualify as domestic for shipping purposes.” HABLA IGLESIA? Paul Garson, of Garson’s Religious Goods in the Duke City, received a referral recently from one of his British church-goods suppliers. The agent requested that a Honduran church “Try the shop in Mexico, they should be able to help,” and then listed the Albuquerque address of Garson’s store. “This is not the first time we’ve been confused with Arizona and Mexico,” Garson said.","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f979","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-85853/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-85853/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-85853/","metaTitle":"One of Our 50 Is Missing","metaDescription":"
Send Us Your Story—Please!

Dear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from
","cleanDescription":"Send Us Your Story—Please! Dear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from there. Submissions will be edited for style and space. Please include your name, hometown, and state. E-mail to fifty@nmmagazine.com, or mail to Fifty, New Mexico Magazine , 495 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501. ONE OF OUR DISHES IS MISSING When Bernie Crum’s school-age daughter was assigned to write a report about a U.S. state, she picked New Mexico. She wrote about foods common to New Mexico that are different than those in her home state of Missouri. Along with the wide use of chiles, she also mentioned that she loved sopaipillas. When the teacher returned her paper to her, she had crossed out sopaipillas and wrote in soup and peas . Are teachers using auto-correct these days, or what? TREES, PLEASE! Kenneth Robertson of Clovis learned something new when trying to order trees for his new orchard business over the phone. “We are not allowed to ship some kinds of trees to foreign countries,” the person said. Robertson tried to explain that New Mexico is part of the United States, but eventually just asked her to ship the trees 10 miles away to his coworker, who lived in Farwell, Texas. She was happy to oblige. NO ACCESS ZONE This Olympics year reminded Don Bishop of Silver Cliff, Colorado, of his thwarted quest to buy tickets to the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. When he called to order them, the woman on the phone asked where he was born. He said, “Logan, New Mexico.” She informed Bishop that he would need to contact the Mexican embassy. BAD EXCHANGE RATE Martha Siegling Luke of Citrus Heights, California, likes to bring gifts back whenever she visits her home state of New Mexico. She gave a jar of salsa from Chimayó to her coworker, and told her a little bit about the history of Chimayó’s Santuario and the state. “I asked if she had ever been to visit New Mexico. She said no, but she wanted to someday. She then asked if I had to pay in pesos.” Martha told her, “I didn’t go to Mexico, I went to New Mexico … next to Arizona.” Her coworker said, “I know, but did you have to pay in pesos?” TRANSACTION DECLINED Niranjan Khalsa, formerly a corporate purchaser for a large security firm in Española, ran into trouble when attempting to place a sizable equipment order from a New York vendor. When she gave the clerk her address, the woman said, “Oh, I’m so sorry, ma’am, but I’ll have to cancel your order. We don’t ship overseas.” Khalsa said, “I then explained that the large expanse of land between Texas and Arizona is actually a state called New Mexico, and would qualify as domestic for shipping purposes.” HABLA IGLESIA? Paul Garson, of Garson’s Religious Goods in the Duke City, received a referral recently from one of his British church-goods suppliers. The agent requested that a Honduran church “Try the shop in Mexico, they should be able to help,” and then listed the Albuquerque address of Garson’s store. “This is not the first time we’ve been confused with Arizona and Mexico,” Garson said.","publish_start_moment":"2014-05-06T12:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:56:12.340Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f978","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","title":"Enchantment, For Sale","slug":"nm-living-real-estate-85850","publish_start":"2014-05-06T11:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52","58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb","58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0"],"tags_ids":["59090d4be1efff4c9916fa90","59090da3e1efff4c9916fad6","59090d72e1efff4c9916fab3"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_tagline":"Ten money-saving, drama-ducking insights on buying a house in New Mexico.","created":"2014-05-06T11:52:43.000Z","legacy_id":"85850","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"enchantment, for sale","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:32.140Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

If you live somewhere else, or if you’re already here and currently renting, surely you’ve had the notion: wouldn’t it be great to buy a house in New Mexico? Then a nagging voice clears its throat. Your inner smart shopper—or your pragmatic partner—has a few questions and wants a little more information in order to make a wise decision. You can start to quell those qualms with this list of 10 things you should know about buying a home in New Mexico.

\r\n\r\n

1. IT’S AFFORDABLE

\r\n\r\n

“Affordable” might be a relative term, but even though several locales offer multimillion-dollar mansions, you can find homes from the mid-$100,000s to the mid-$400,000s statewide. The 2013 national median was $197,100. Prices in Angel Fire, a mountain resort east of Taos, and Santa Fe soar above the national median; Albuquerque, Las Cruces and south-central New Mexico, Silver City, and the Truth or Consequences area come in well below it. While sales volumes inched up last year, the fitful housing recovery leaves plenty of opportunity for finding a smart bargain.

\r\n\r\n

2. RETIREMENT=A REBOOT

\r\n\r\n

New Mexico always scores high on listings of the best places to retire. Tallying up home prices, cost of living, taxes, quality of life, and weather, Money magazine tapped Las Cruces as one of its “best places to retire.” AARP The Magazine named it a “retirement dream town.” From Silver City to Las Vegas to Farmington, colleges add an intellectual dimension to many of the state’s midsize cities, meaning you can light out for the territory without abandoning culture. Ron Cobb, managing partner of Avalon Jubilee, says people from “every corner” of the country retire to the active-adult community Jubilee Los Lunas. A quick 20 minutes from central Albuquerque, it offers a small-town living without sacrificing the amenities of the nearby metro area, from shopping to health care to jobs and the arts.

\r\n\r\n

3. THE LINGO OF ADOBE CHARM

\r\n\r\n

Over thousands of years, New Mexicans have developed an architectural style expressing an evolutionary depth you can’t find anywhere else in America. The still-beating heart of this ancient tradition pumps a slurry of mud, straw, and clay—adobe, that is. Whether you crave an authentic adobe hacienda of a certain age or prefer a modern frame-and-stucco house, learn the lingo, the features, and the foibles of what we lovingly (and sometimes ironically) call “adobe charm.” Historic properties and newly built homes in the Pueblo Revival and Territorial Revival styles share the same classic features. Bone up on terms like vigas, latillas, corbels, parapets, coping, kiva fireplaces, and Talavera tile. Investigate cement and synthetic stuccos, mud plaster (it lets adobe breathe, but ¡híjole! the maintenance!), dirt-insulated attics, how to hang pictures on a mud wall, directing roof runoff through canales, and fixing evaporative coolers.

\r\n\r\n

To learn more, read the classic Santa Fe Style (Rizzoli), which provides a thorough and beautiful survey of New Mexico homes and design.

\r\n\r\n

4. SURPRISING ARCHITECTURE

\r\n\r\n

Not every house is a wavy-walled, crooked-door adobe down a dirt road with hens pecking piñon nuts along the bar ditch. Contemporary, modern, and even postmodern glass-and-steel homes dot the landscape. Large-scale subdivisions skew toward Southwestern and, more recently, so-called Tuscan styles. Elsewhere, older in-town neighborhoods in Las Vegas, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and Silver City sport vintage Victorians and Craftsman bungalows on elm-shaded streets.

\r\n\r\n

5. TAKE IT SLOW

\r\n\r\n

House hunting isn’t speed dating. “The people I see the most comfortable after moving here have come at different seasons, spent a good bit of time looking around, and really know what they’re buying,” says Frank O’Mahony, of Evolve Santa Fe Real Estate. Attorney Suzanne Gaulin, a native of Ontario, Canada, says she courted small towns all over New Mexico but “kept coming back to Las Vegas because there was something about the geography and the little town and the people, something real.”

\r\n\r\n

If you’re interested in the Albuquerque area, take advantage of the Spring 2014 Homes of Enchantment Parade. On this tour of 35 homes, you can explore a wide range of styles and price ranges across the metro area on April 25–27 and May 2–4. For more information and a map, visit homesofenchantmentparade.com.

\r\n\r\n

6. IT TAKES ALL KINDS

\r\n\r\n

In New Mexico, you can find homes large and small, new and old, along a single road. O’Mahony says some folks appreciate the variety while others “rebel against our eclectic neighborhoods” and “can’t believe what they have to drive through” to view a high-end property. In older communities—small villages or historic neighborhoods in town—sprawling designer showplaces sometimes rub shoulders with mobile homes and rustic structures in need of attention. Newer subdivisions at any price point specialize in sleek uniformity. Let a real estate agent guide you to your comfort zone.

\r\n\r\n

7. RENT IT WHILE YOU’RE GONE

\r\n\r\n

Many second-home owners defray the costs of a second home by renting it out. In well-established vacation-rental markets like Santa Fe, Angel Fire, Red River, Elephant Butte, Chama, and Ruidoso, you can hire agents to manage your home. Marilyn Proctor, owner of Proctor Property Management, in Santa Fe, educates prospective rental-home buyers about the expenses. “The greatest outlay after buying can be furnishing it,” Proctor says. Clients often expect site-specific high-end luxury, interspersed with rustic New Mexico–style pieces picked up for a song. She’ll help develop a revenue-generating plan that satisfies the capital city’s Byzantine rental-home permitting rules. They allow 17 rental engagements a year, each from one to 29 days. You can have only one rental engagement a week. Given those rules, you’ll want to strategically plan your rental days to maximize income. Other communities are less restrictive. Even if you don’t rent, get someone to keep an eye on it while you’re gone.

\r\n\r\n

8. WEATHER MAY VARY

\r\n\r\n

Yes, it’s sunny here. New Mexico bags 320 to 340 days of sunshine a year. That number varies around the state, with generally more sol in the south and a bit less around the northern mountains. All regions of the state experience four distinct seasons. Make sure your dream home can handle the weather. On midcentury Pueblo-style houses, check the roof drainage—a sagging flat roof with poor drainage can trap the water and leak. Homes built more recently have a slightly pitched roof to correct that problem. In the mountains, think about where the roof will deposit snow. For any home, view the place critically, ask questions, insist on disclosures, and consider hiring an engineer to inspect the home and address issues like drainage and structure.

\r\n\r\n

9. FRIENDS AND FAMILY WILL FOLLOW

\r\n\r\n

Pennsylvania native Barbara Humphries, who moved here from England with her husband, Tony, found Albuquerque socially open: “Everybody was so friendly. People talk to you when you’re standing in line.” And I can’t count how many people I know who moved here only to be followed by their parents, brothers, or sisters. Usually that’s a good thing. Be prepared.

\r\n\r\n

10. THE LOVE NEVER FADES

\r\n\r\n

“Tony absolutely loves it in America, but he knows New Mexico is not what the rest of America is like,” Barbara Humphries says of her British husband. Take it from the old-timers: The seductive sense of marvelous mystery that attracted you here never diminishes.

","teaser_raw":"

If you live somewhere else, or if you’re already here and currently renting, surely you’ve had the notion: wouldn’t it be great to buy a house in New Mexico? Then a nagging voice clears its throat.

","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e8f","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","name":"Charles C. Poling","image_id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.238Z","blog":"magazine","_name_sort":"charles c. poling","updated":"2017-04-07T19:23:02.520Z","image":{"_id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","original_public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a","title":"Charles Poling","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a","version":1491592948,"signature":"a1e9de47ffcf2af2552c8ef4d964d757d7127df1","width":3057,"height":3057,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-04-07T19:22:28.000Z","bytes":819746,"type":"upload","etag":"51266d9e3fdd066a649893da5ac973f6","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1491592948/clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1491592948/clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a.jpg","original_filename":"file"},"alt_text_raw":"Charles Poling","credits":"Charles Poling","content_owner":"magazine","title_sort":"charles poling","updated":"2017-04-07T19:22:38.125Z","deleted":false,"created":"2017-04-07T19:22:38.126Z","id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Charles Poling"},"_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","title":"Charles C. Poling","slug":"charles-c-poling","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/charles-c-poling/58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/charles-c-poling/58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8/#comments","totalPosts":16},"categories":[{"_id":"58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52","title":"Lifestyle","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"lifestyle","updated":"2017-03-14T18:51:36.346Z","created":"2017-03-14T18:51:36.346Z","_totalPosts":72,"id":"58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52","slug":"lifestyle","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/lifestyle/58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/lifestyle/58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52/#comments","totalPosts":72},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb","blog":"magazine","title":"NM Living","_title_sort":"nm living","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.583Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.589Z","_totalPosts":15,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb","slug":"nm-living","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/nm-living/58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/nm-living/58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb/#comments","totalPosts":15},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0","blog":"magazine","title":"May 2014","_title_sort":"may 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.576Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.581Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0","slug":"may-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0/#comments","totalPosts":16}],"teaser":"

If you live somewhere else, or if you’re already here and currently renting, surely you’ve had the notion: wouldn’t it be great to buy a house in New Mexico? Then a nagging voice clears its throat.

","description":"If you live somewhere else, or if you’re already here and currently renting, surely you’ve had the notion: wouldn’t it be great to buy a house in New Mexico? Then a nagging voice clears its throat. Your inner smart shopper—or your pragmatic partner—has a few questions and wants a little more information in order to make a wise decision. You can start to quell those qualms with this list of 10 things you should know about buying a home in New Mexico. 1. IT’S AFFORDABLE “Affordable” might be a relative term, but even though several locales offer multimillion-dollar mansions, you can find homes from the mid-$100,000s to the mid-$400,000s statewide. The 2013 national median was $197,100. Prices in Angel Fire, a mountain resort east of Taos, and Santa Fe soar above the national median; Albuquerque, Las Cruces and south-central New Mexico, Silver City, and the Truth or Consequences area come in well below it. While sales volumes inched up last year, the fitful housing recovery leaves plenty of opportunity for finding a smart bargain. 2. RETIREMENT=A REBOOT New Mexico always scores high on listings of the best places to retire. Tallying up home prices, cost of living, taxes, quality of life, and weather, Money magazine tapped Las Cruces as one of its “best places to retire.” AARP The Magazine named it a “retirement dream town.” From Silver City to Las Vegas to Farmington, colleges add an intellectual dimension to many of the state’s midsize cities, meaning you can light out for the territory without abandoning culture. Ron Cobb, managing partner of Avalon Jubilee, says people from “every corner” of the country retire to the active-adult community Jubilee Los Lunas. A quick 20 minutes from central Albuquerque, it offers a small-town living without sacrificing the amenities of the nearby metro area, from shopping to health care to jobs and the arts. 3. THE LINGO OF ADOBE CHARM Over thousands of years, New Mexicans have developed an architectural style expressing an evolutionary depth you can’t find anywhere else in America. The still-beating heart of this ancient tradition pumps a slurry of mud, straw, and clay—adobe, that is. Whether you crave an authentic adobe hacienda of a certain age or prefer a modern frame-and-stucco house, learn the lingo, the features, and the foibles of what we lovingly (and sometimes ironically) call “adobe charm.” Historic properties and newly built homes in the Pueblo Revival and Territorial Revival styles share the same classic features. Bone up on terms like vigas, latillas, corbels, parapets, coping, kiva fireplaces, and Talavera tile. Investigate cement and synthetic stuccos, mud plaster (it lets adobe breathe, but ¡híjole! the maintenance!), dirt-insulated attics, how to hang pictures on a mud wall, directing roof runoff through canales, and fixing evaporative coolers. To learn more, read the classic Santa Fe Style (Rizzoli), which provides a thorough and beautiful survey of New Mexico homes and design. 4. SURPRISING ARCHITECTURE Not every house is a wavy-walled, crooked-door adobe down a dirt road with hens pecking piñon nuts along the bar ditch. Contemporary, modern, and even postmodern glass-and-steel homes dot the landscape. Large-scale subdivisions skew toward Southwestern and, more recently, so-called Tuscan styles. Elsewhere, older in-town neighborhoods in Las Vegas, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and Silver City sport vintage Victorians and Craftsman bungalows on elm-shaded streets. 5. TAKE IT SLOW House hunting isn’t speed dating. “The people I see the most comfortable after moving here have come at different seasons, spent a good bit of time looking around, and really know what they’re buying,” says Frank O’Mahony, of Evolve Santa Fe Real Estate. Attorney Suzanne Gaulin, a native of Ontario, Canada, says she courted small towns all over New Mexico but “kept coming back to Las Vegas because there was something about the geography and the little town and the people, something real.” If you’re interested in the Albuquerque area, take advantage of the Spring 2014 Homes of Enchantment Parade. On this tour of 35 homes, you can explore a wide range of styles and price ranges across the metro area on April 25–27 and May 2–4. For more information and a map, visit homesofenchantmentparade.com . 6. IT TAKES ALL KINDS In New Mexico, you can find homes large and small, new and old, along a single road. O’Mahony says some folks appreciate the variety while others “rebel against our eclectic neighborhoods” and “can’t believe what they have to drive through” to view a high-end property. In older communities—small villages or historic neighborhoods in town—sprawling designer showplaces sometimes rub shoulders with mobile homes and rustic structures in need of attention. Newer subdivisions at any price point specialize in sleek uniformity. Let a real estate agent guide you to your comfort zone. 7. RENT IT WHILE YOU’RE GONE Many second-home owners defray the costs of a second home by renting it out. In well-established vacation-rental markets like Santa Fe, Angel Fire, Red River, Elephant Butte, Chama, and Ruidoso, you can hire agents to manage your home. Marilyn Proctor, owner of Proctor Property Management, in Santa Fe, educates prospective rental-home buyers about the expenses. “The greatest outlay after buying can be furnishing it,” Proctor says. Clients often expect site-specific high-end luxury, interspersed with rustic New Mexico–style pieces picked up for a song. She’ll help develop a revenue-generating plan that satisfies the capital city’s Byzantine rental-home permitting rules. They allow 17 rental engagements a year, each from one to 29 days. You can have only one rental engagement a week. Given those rules, you’ll want to strategically plan your rental days to maximize income. Other communities are less restrictive. Even if you don’t rent, get someone to keep an eye on it while you’re gone. 8. WEATHER MAY VARY Yes, it’s sunny here. New Mexico bags 320 to 340 days of sunshine a year. That number varies around the state, with generally more sol in the south and a bit less around the northern mountains. All regions of the state experience four distinct seasons. Make sure your dream home can handle the weather. On midcentury Pueblo-style houses, check the roof drainage—a sagging flat roof with poor drainage can trap the water and leak. Homes built more recently have a slightly pitched roof to correct that problem. In the mountains, think about where the roof will deposit snow. For any home, view the place critically, ask questions, insist on disclosures, and consider hiring an engineer to inspect the home and address issues like drainage and structure. 9. FRIENDS AND FAMILY WILL FOLLOW Pennsylvania native Barbara Humphries, who moved here from England with her husband, Tony, found Albuquerque socially open: “Everybody was so friendly. People talk to you when you’re standing in line.” And I can’t count how many people I know who moved here only to be followed by their parents, brothers, or sisters. Usually that’s a good thing. Be prepared. 10. THE LOVE NEVER FADES “Tony absolutely loves it in America, but he knows New Mexico is not what the rest of America is like,” Barbara Humphries says of her British husband. Take it from the old-timers: The seductive sense of marvelous mystery that attracted you here never diminishes. ✜","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f978","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/nm-living-real-estate-85850/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/nm-living-real-estate-85850/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/nm-living-real-estate-85850/","metaTitle":"Enchantment, For Sale","metaDescription":"

If you live somewhere else, or if you’re already here and currently renting, surely you’ve had the notion: wouldn’t it be great to buy a house in New Mexico? Then a nagging voice clears its throat.

","cleanDescription":"If you live somewhere else, or if you’re already here and currently renting, surely you’ve had the notion: wouldn’t it be great to buy a house in New Mexico? Then a nagging voice clears its throat. Your inner smart shopper—or your pragmatic partner—has a few questions and wants a little more information in order to make a wise decision. You can start to quell those qualms with this list of 10 things you should know about buying a home in New Mexico. 1. IT’S AFFORDABLE “Affordable” might be a relative term, but even though several locales offer multimillion-dollar mansions, you can find homes from the mid-$100,000s to the mid-$400,000s statewide. The 2013 national median was $197,100. Prices in Angel Fire, a mountain resort east of Taos, and Santa Fe soar above the national median; Albuquerque, Las Cruces and south-central New Mexico, Silver City, and the Truth or Consequences area come in well below it. While sales volumes inched up last year, the fitful housing recovery leaves plenty of opportunity for finding a smart bargain. 2. RETIREMENT=A REBOOT New Mexico always scores high on listings of the best places to retire. Tallying up home prices, cost of living, taxes, quality of life, and weather, Money magazine tapped Las Cruces as one of its “best places to retire.” AARP The Magazine named it a “retirement dream town.” From Silver City to Las Vegas to Farmington, colleges add an intellectual dimension to many of the state’s midsize cities, meaning you can light out for the territory without abandoning culture. Ron Cobb, managing partner of Avalon Jubilee, says people from “every corner” of the country retire to the active-adult community Jubilee Los Lunas. A quick 20 minutes from central Albuquerque, it offers a small-town living without sacrificing the amenities of the nearby metro area, from shopping to health care to jobs and the arts. 3. THE LINGO OF ADOBE CHARM Over thousands of years, New Mexicans have developed an architectural style expressing an evolutionary depth you can’t find anywhere else in America. The still-beating heart of this ancient tradition pumps a slurry of mud, straw, and clay—adobe, that is. Whether you crave an authentic adobe hacienda of a certain age or prefer a modern frame-and-stucco house, learn the lingo, the features, and the foibles of what we lovingly (and sometimes ironically) call “adobe charm.” Historic properties and newly built homes in the Pueblo Revival and Territorial Revival styles share the same classic features. Bone up on terms like vigas, latillas, corbels, parapets, coping, kiva fireplaces, and Talavera tile. Investigate cement and synthetic stuccos, mud plaster (it lets adobe breathe, but ¡híjole! the maintenance!), dirt-insulated attics, how to hang pictures on a mud wall, directing roof runoff through canales, and fixing evaporative coolers. To learn more, read the classic Santa Fe Style (Rizzoli), which provides a thorough and beautiful survey of New Mexico homes and design. 4. SURPRISING ARCHITECTURE Not every house is a wavy-walled, crooked-door adobe down a dirt road with hens pecking piñon nuts along the bar ditch. Contemporary, modern, and even postmodern glass-and-steel homes dot the landscape. Large-scale subdivisions skew toward Southwestern and, more recently, so-called Tuscan styles. Elsewhere, older in-town neighborhoods in Las Vegas, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and Silver City sport vintage Victorians and Craftsman bungalows on elm-shaded streets. 5. TAKE IT SLOW House hunting isn’t speed dating. “The people I see the most comfortable after moving here have come at different seasons, spent a good bit of time looking around, and really know what they’re buying,” says Frank O’Mahony, of Evolve Santa Fe Real Estate. Attorney Suzanne Gaulin, a native of Ontario, Canada, says she courted small towns all over New Mexico but “kept coming back to Las Vegas because there was something about the geography and the little town and the people, something real.” If you’re interested in the Albuquerque area, take advantage of the Spring 2014 Homes of Enchantment Parade. On this tour of 35 homes, you can explore a wide range of styles and price ranges across the metro area on April 25–27 and May 2–4. For more information and a map, visit homesofenchantmentparade.com . 6. IT TAKES ALL KINDS In New Mexico, you can find homes large and small, new and old, along a single road. O’Mahony says some folks appreciate the variety while others “rebel against our eclectic neighborhoods” and “can’t believe what they have to drive through” to view a high-end property. In older communities—small villages or historic neighborhoods in town—sprawling designer showplaces sometimes rub shoulders with mobile homes and rustic structures in need of attention. Newer subdivisions at any price point specialize in sleek uniformity. Let a real estate agent guide you to your comfort zone. 7. RENT IT WHILE YOU’RE GONE Many second-home owners defray the costs of a second home by renting it out. In well-established vacation-rental markets like Santa Fe, Angel Fire, Red River, Elephant Butte, Chama, and Ruidoso, you can hire agents to manage your home. Marilyn Proctor, owner of Proctor Property Management, in Santa Fe, educates prospective rental-home buyers about the expenses. “The greatest outlay after buying can be furnishing it,” Proctor says. Clients often expect site-specific high-end luxury, interspersed with rustic New Mexico–style pieces picked up for a song. She’ll help develop a revenue-generating plan that satisfies the capital city’s Byzantine rental-home permitting rules. They allow 17 rental engagements a year, each from one to 29 days. You can have only one rental engagement a week. Given those rules, you’ll want to strategically plan your rental days to maximize income. Other communities are less restrictive. Even if you don’t rent, get someone to keep an eye on it while you’re gone. 8. WEATHER MAY VARY Yes, it’s sunny here. New Mexico bags 320 to 340 days of sunshine a year. That number varies around the state, with generally more sol in the south and a bit less around the northern mountains. All regions of the state experience four distinct seasons. Make sure your dream home can handle the weather. On midcentury Pueblo-style houses, check the roof drainage—a sagging flat roof with poor drainage can trap the water and leak. Homes built more recently have a slightly pitched roof to correct that problem. In the mountains, think about where the roof will deposit snow. For any home, view the place critically, ask questions, insist on disclosures, and consider hiring an engineer to inspect the home and address issues like drainage and structure. 9. FRIENDS AND FAMILY WILL FOLLOW Pennsylvania native Barbara Humphries, who moved here from England with her husband, Tony, found Albuquerque socially open: “Everybody was so friendly. People talk to you when you’re standing in line.” And I can’t count how many people I know who moved here only to be followed by their parents, brothers, or sisters. Usually that’s a good thing. Be prepared. 10. THE LOVE NEVER FADES “Tony absolutely loves it in America, but he knows New Mexico is not what the rest of America is like,” Barbara Humphries says of her British husband. Take it from the old-timers: The seductive sense of marvelous mystery that attracted you here never diminishes. ✜","publish_start_moment":"2014-05-06T11:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:56:12.341Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f977","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1ad","title":"Up on the Roof","slug":"tasting-nm-85847","image_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4eb","publish_start":"2014-05-06T11:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f32a","58c83a3d1f16f9392cf09ac4","58b4b2404c2774661570f2f0"],"tags_ids":["59090e3ce1efff4c9916fb32","59090c7ae1efff4c9916fa01","59090d72e1efff4c9916fab3"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"Douglas Merriam","custom_tagline":"It’s time for outdoor eats and drinks in Albuquerque.","created":"2014-05-06T11:13:19.000Z","legacy_id":"85847","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"up on the roof","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:32.073Z","active":true,"description_raw":"
Grilled Pizza with Fire-Roasted Tomato Sauce
\r\nPizza-oven pizza is wonderful in restaurants, but not many of us have a special high-heat oven at home to get similar results. Using a grill, either charcoal or gas, is the best way to emulate pizza-oven pizza. Grilled pizza should be made like a Neapolitan pie, with a thin crust and a relatively light load of toppings. This recipe doubles up on the grilled flavor with a homemade sauce of fire-charred tomatoes. I’ve also included a scattering of fresh basil common to a margherita pizza, but other room temperature or warm toppings can be added. Just use a light hand, since the quick cooking time doesn’t allow for toppings to thoroughly heat on the grill. Makes two 11-inch pizzas
\r\n
\r\nFire-Roasted Tomato Sauce\r\n\r\n
    \r\n\t
  • 3 red-ripe plum tomatoes
  • \r\n\t
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • \r\n\t
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 tablespoon flavorful extra-virgin olive oil
  • \r\n\t
  • Splash or two of garlic-flavored oil, optional
  • \r\n\t
  • Salt
  • \r\n
\r\n \r\n\r\n
    \r\n\t
  • Pizza Dough for the Grill
  • \r\n\t
  • 6 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced and blotted of moisture (preferred) or 1¼ cups grated mozzarella
  • \r\n\t
  • Pinch or two of crushed, dried hot red chile, optional
  • \r\n\t
  • ½ cup lightly packed thin-sliced fresh basil leaves
  • \r\n
\r\n
\r\nFire up grill for a two-level fire capable of cooking at the same time on both high heat (1–2 seconds with the hand test) and medium-low heat (5–6 seconds with the hand test).
\r\n
\r\nGrill tomatoes over high heat about 6 to 8 minutes, turning on all sides, until skins are somewhat blackened and split, and tomatoes are soft. As soon as tomatoes are cool enough to handle, halve them and squeeze out watery liquid. Purée tomatoes in a blender or food processor with remaining sauce ingredients.
\r\n
\r\nPlace tomato sauce, mozzarella, optional chile, and basil within easy reach of grill. Have baking sheet near grill on convenient work surface, and have large spatula or pizza peel handy.
\r\n
\r\nPlace first crust on grill, laying it directly on cooking grate. Grill uncovered over high heat for 1–1½ minutes, until crust becomes firm yet still flexible. Don’t worry about any bubbles that form on crust, as they will be flattened when you turn over crust in next step.
\r\n
\r\nFlip crust onto baking sheet, cooked side up. Immediately spoon on one-half of tomato sauce, and sprinkle with one half of cheese and, if you wish, a bit of chile. Quickly return pizza to grill (without baking sheet), uncooked side down. Arrange pie so that half of it is over high heat and other half is over medium-low. Cook pizza another 3–5 minutes, rotating it in ¼ turns about every 30–45 seconds. This may sound awkward, but becomes second nature very quickly. Using spatula to lift edge slightly, check bottom during last minute or two, rotating a bit faster or slower if needed, to get a uniformly brown crisp crust. Scatter with basil shortly before removing pizza from grill.
\r\n
\r\nSlice pizza into wedges and serve immediately.
\r\n
\r\nThe Hand Test: The effective way to measure heat on the grill’s surface is to place your hand a couple of inches above the top of the cooking grate and count the number of seconds before you have to pull it away. One to 2 seconds signifies hot, and 5–6 seconds is mediumlow, with other temperatures in between.
\r\n
\r\nPizza Dough for the Grill
\r\nThe crust for a grilled pizza should be a supporting player, but an important one. You can use store-bought dough, but we’ve never found one that gives us the crispy, crunchy, flavorsome results that come from this homemade dough, which is a little stiffer than average.
\r\n
\r\nMakes two thin 11-inch pizza crusts\r\n
    \r\n\t
  • 2 cups flour, preferably bread flour, or unbleached all-purpose flour (more as needed)
  • \r\n\t
  • 3 tablespoons cornmeal, preferably coarse ground
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 teaspoon rapid-rise yeast such as Fleischmann’s
  • \r\n\t
  • ¾ cup lukewarm water
  • \r\n\t
  • 2 tablespoons plus
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • \r\n
\r\nIn food processor, pulse together flour, cornmeal, salt, and yeast. With motor running, add water and 2 tablespoons of oil. Continue processing for about 30 seconds more, until dough forms a fairly cohesive ball that is smooth and elastic. If it remains sticky, add another tablespoon or two of flour.
\r\n
\r\nKnead dough a few times on floured work surface, forming it into a ball. Pour remaining oil into large bowl and add dough, turning it around and over until coated with oil. Cover with damp cloth. Set dough in warm, draft-free spot and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour. Form dough into two thin disks, each about 1⁄8-inch thick and 11 inches in diameter. We find that a combination of first flattening crust with rolling pin and then stretching and prodding it with fingers works best. (A raised edge isn’t necessary.)
\r\n
\r\nDough is ready to use at this point, but also can be saved in refrigerator or freezer for later. Stack crusts on baking sheet covered with wax paper, and place another sheet of wax paper between crusts. If refrigerating or freezing, chill crusts on baking sheet for about 30 minutes to firm dough, then remove from baking sheet and wrap crusts before storing. Bring crusts back to room temperature before proceeding.
\r\n
\r\nAdapted from 100 Grilling Recipes You Can’t Live Without © 2014 Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison, Harvard Common Press.
\r\n\r\n

Rooftop alfresco dining and drinks strikes me as elevated in all ways. The higher perspective gives a broader look down at streetscapes and bubbling fountains. It allows gazes to soar upward and, here, that means panoramas of mountaintops and fiery sunsets. Meals taste better outdoors, especially in New Mexico’s blue-sky, bug-free outdoors. Once lilacs and crabapples burst into bloom, it’s time to go up on the roof. Here’s a selection of my choices for this spring and summer.

\r\n\r\n

Amore Neapolitan Pizzeria
\r\nOn Amore’s University of New Mexico–area rooftop, you might indeed “see the moon hit the sky like a big pizza pie.” It was love, actually, that struck Gabriel and Kimberly Amador when they met in Naples, Italy. Gabe had accompanied his parents for a business move and met Kim, who was serving in the NATO forces. Planning their future, they decided to train as Neapolitan pizzaiolos, and open a true Naples-style pizzeria when they landed back in the United States. The Amadors are certified by the Associazione Pizzaiuoli Napoletani, which is a big deal. Kim is one of the small number of women who has been trained not just to make the dough, but also to be a fornaia, the tender of the pizzas in the wood-fired oven. Even though Amore has been in business less than a year, it serves the best pizza in New Mexico, and I don’t say that lightly.The care the Amadors put into the pizzas and other dishes shows a real commitment to quality. The scarlet mosaic-tiled pizza oven, named Sophia, is nearly as drop-dead gorgeous as its namesake Italian actress. Extra-fine 00 Caputo flour, legendary in the food world, is sourced directly from Naples, as are the San Marzano tomatoes. Just about everything else that can be found locally is used, from the fresh basil for the margherita pies to the pecans for the Waldorf salad. Gabe and Kim even made an arrangement with a local tree service to cut standing dead wood, usually ash or oak, to burn in the oven for the blistering fires needed to almost instantly cook the thin pizzas. The staff stays lean from running hot pizza, beer, and wine up to the third-floor deck, which captures a panorama from the Sandías to the sunset. Launched last summer, there’s lots to love about Amore. 2929 Monte Vista NE; (505) 554-1967; amoreabq.com

\r\n\r\n

Seasons Rooftop Cantina
\r\nThe terrace atop Seasons overlooks an intimate plaza enlivened by a splashing Mexican fountain. Some of the handsome upper level is enclosed, with a semi-circular bar counter that beckons. However, the action’s really out and around, on the surrounding cantina terrace, and in a connected outdoor room, where a pair of garage doors sweep upward to open the space to the breezes. Locals know Seasons for its rooftop live jazz, which kicks off as the days lengthen.

\r\n\r\n

On the fringe of Old Town, Seasons sits back a bit from its Mountain Road address. The building is contemporary adobe style, with a brightly painted indoor dining room on the ground level. On nearly every wall, abstracted Southwestern landscape paintings by Albuquerque resident Kevin Tolman catch the eye. In this downstairs space, Chef Paul Mandigo serves a well-crafted menu of upscale dishes such as rotisserie chicken with kale-and-pumpkin seed coleslaw, or prime rib with green-chile mashed potatoes. You can have those dishes served to you upstairs on the rooftop, or choose from the more casual “cantina” fare. Think red lentil hummus (recipe at mynm.us/rc-hummus) and pita wedges, and tacos filled with sautéed cilantro-lime shrimp, or carne asada with Moroccan hot sauce. If there’s a grilled chicken sandwich topped with a haystack of crispy onion strings offered as a special when you go, be sure to order it, as it’s among the top sandwiches I’ve eaten this year. Along with the eats, order a pitcher of housemade sangria, or maybe a mojito, while you watch stars emerge in the night sky. 2031 Mountain Rd. NW; (505) 766-5100; seasonsabq.com

\r\n\r\n

Apothecary Bar and Lounge, Hotel Parq Central
\r\nThe Hotel Parq Central, near I-25’s intersection with Central Avenue, is one of my top choices when I stay in Albuquerque. Steffany Hollingsworth and HVL Interiors from Santa Fe put together an inspired, comfortably chic design—cleanly contemporary while linking clearly to the past. The four-story building was orignally a hospital, and the design throughout it playfully hints at that history, especially in the rooftop Apothecary Bar and Lounge. Humorous touches include an antique surgery table for bar nibbles and a wall full of fascinating old medicine-bottle labels. Some striking vintage apothecary jars line the lighted back bar.

\r\n\r\n

Mark Encinias, the hotel’s genial food and beverage director, also serves as the head mixologist. He loves creating seasonal cocktails such as the refreshing Sangre de Naranja Margarita, Flying Figs, and Rosemary Gin Fizz (recipes on p. 56). Accompanying nibbles are simple, perhaps a selection of olives with Manchego cheese, chips with housemade salsa and red chile queso, or sesame-crusted calamari with green chile–chive aioli. Apothecary’s terrace views, especially toward the west

\r\n\r\n

at sunset, may make you forget all about eating. The open-air terrace is spacious, with lots of cushy Dedon lounge chairs, and blankets if there’s a chill in the air. 806 Central Ave. SE; (505) 242-0040; hotelparqcentral.com

\r\n\r\n

Ibiza, Hotel Andaluz
\r\nYou may remember that my February column mentioned James Campbell Caruso taking over the restaurant Más, at the Andaluz. The esteemed Santa Fe chef and multiple James Beard Best Southwest Chef Award nominee also oversees food and drink at the rooftop bar, Ibiza. A substantial fire-emitting sculpture greets guests stepping out onto this large, sleek second-floor terrace. Scattered vine-draped wire ramadas surround some of the tables. The rooftop is perfectly sited to take in the enormous swath of eastern sky and the Sandía Mountains, which turn ruddy from reflected light as the sun sets. Along with the full bar, Chef James serves up Spanish nibbles such as warm bacon-wrapped dates, and cocas, pizza-like Mallorcan flatbreads. 125 Second St. NW; (505) 923-9033; hotelandaluz.com

\r\n\r\n

Flying Figs
\r\nThis and the following two recipes come from Apothecary at Hotel Parq Central. Mark Encinias, the head mixologist, created all three refreshers.

\r\n\r\n

Makes 1

\r\n\r\n
    \r\n\t
  • 2 slices fresh fig
  • \r\n\t
  • ½ ounce St. Germain liqueur
  • \r\n\t
  • 1½ ounces vodka
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • \r\n\t
  • ½ ounce agave nectar
  • \r\n\t
  • Small mint sprig
  • \r\n
\r\n\r\n

Muddle together fig and St. Germain in cocktail mixing glass or shaker. Add vodka, lemon juice, agave nectar, and several ice cubes. Shake well and strain into chilled 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Garnish with mint and serve.

\r\n\r\n
\r\n

Note: If you can’t find fresh figs, cut off 2 slices of a dried fig and soak them in the St. Germain for 5 minutes before muddling.

\r\n\r\n
\r\n

Sangre de Naranja Margarita

\r\n\r\n

This margarita gets its fetchingly pale sunset hue partially from a Sicilian blood-orange liqueur available in well-stocked liquor stores. The liqueur’s flavor is a bit more bittersweet and zestier than common orange liqueurs such as triple sec, Cointreau, or Citronge. Any of these may be substituted in a pinch, if you wish. Just bump up the grenadine a touch to add more color. Don’t overdo it, though, or the drink will become too sweet.

\r\n\r\n

Makes 1

\r\n\r\n
    \r\n\t
  • Lime wedge and kosher salt
  • \r\n\t
  • 1. ounces silver tequila, such as Sauza Blue
  • \r\n\t
  • ½ ounce Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 ounce agave nectar
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 ounce freshly squeezed lime juice
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 ounce freshly squeezed orange juice
  • \r\n\t
  • ¼ ounce grenadine
  • \r\n
\r\n\r\n

Rub lime wedge around edge of 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Dip glass rim in salt.

\r\n\r\n

Combine the remaining ingredients in cocktail shaker with several ice cubes. Shake well and strain into prepared glass. Serve.
\r\n
\r\nRosemary Gin Fizz
\r\n
\r\nApothecary whips up this summery fizz with Beefeater Gin, but I prefer to use KGB Hacienda Gin, from here in New Mexico.

\r\n\r\n

Makes 1

\r\n\r\n

Rosemary Syrup

\r\n\r\n
    \r\n\t
  • 1 cup water
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 cup sugar
  • \r\n\t
  • 5 large fresh rosemary sprigs
    \r\n\t 
  • \r\n\t
  • 1½ ounces gin
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 ounce rosemary syrup
  • \r\n\t
  • ¾ ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • \r\n\t
  • 1½ ounces soda water Lemon slice Small fresh rosemary sprig
  • \r\n
\r\n\r\n

Make rosemary syrup. Combine ingredients in small saucepan and simmer 5 minutes. Let mixture sit until cool. Strain out rosemary. Refrigerate unneeded syrup in covered jar. It keeps for weeks.

\r\n\r\n

Combine in cocktail shaker gin, syrup, lemon juice, and several ice cubes. Shake well. Place several fresh ice cubes in 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Strain cocktail mixture over ice, and add soda. Garnish with lemon slice and rosemary sprig, and serve.

\r\n\r\n

Cheryl Alters Jamison is New Mexico Magazine’s contributing culinary editor. Read her blog at nmmagazine.com/tastingnm. As of late April, you can order her latest book, The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition, from the New Mexico Magazine Store at shopnm.co/ChimayoCookbook.

\r\n\r\n

See more of Douglas Merriam’s work at douglasmerriam.com.

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Grilled Pizza with Fire-Roasted Tomato Sauce
Pizza-oven pizza is wonderful in restaurants, but not many of us have a special high-heat oven at home to get similar results. Using a grill, either
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Grilled Pizza with Fire-Roasted Tomato Sauce
Pizza-oven pizza is wonderful in restaurants, but not many of us have a special high-heat oven at home to get similar results. Using a grill, either
","description":"Grilled Pizza with Fire-Roasted Tomato Sauce Pizza-oven pizza is wonderful in restaurants, but not many of us have a special high-heat oven at home to get similar results. Using a grill, either charcoal or gas, is the best way to emulate pizza-oven pizza. Grilled pizza should be made like a Neapolitan pie, with a thin crust and a relatively light load of toppings. This recipe doubles up on the grilled flavor with a homemade sauce of fire-charred tomatoes. I’ve also included a scattering of fresh basil common to a margherita pizza, but other room temperature or warm toppings can be added. Just use a light hand, since the quick cooking time doesn’t allow for toppings to thoroughly heat on the grill. Makes two 11-inch pizzas Fire-Roasted Tomato Sauce 3 red-ripe plum tomatoes 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon flavorful extra-virgin olive oil Splash or two of garlic-flavored oil, optional Salt   Pizza Dough for the Grill 6 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced and blotted of moisture (preferred) or 1¼ cups grated mozzarella Pinch or two of crushed, dried hot red chile, optional ½ cup lightly packed thin-sliced fresh basil leaves Fire up grill for a two-level fire capable of cooking at the same time on both high heat (1–2 seconds with the hand test) and medium-low heat (5–6 seconds with the hand test). Grill tomatoes over high heat about 6 to 8 minutes, turning on all sides, until skins are somewhat blackened and split, and tomatoes are soft. As soon as tomatoes are cool enough to handle, halve them and squeeze out watery liquid. Purée tomatoes in a blender or food processor with remaining sauce ingredients. Place tomato sauce, mozzarella, optional chile, and basil within easy reach of grill. Have baking sheet near grill on convenient work surface, and have large spatula or pizza peel handy. Place first crust on grill, laying it directly on cooking grate. Grill uncovered over high heat for 1–1½ minutes, until crust becomes firm yet still flexible. Don’t worry about any bubbles that form on crust, as they will be flattened when you turn over crust in next step. Flip crust onto baking sheet, cooked side up. Immediately spoon on one-half of tomato sauce, and sprinkle with one half of cheese and, if you wish, a bit of chile. Quickly return pizza to grill (without baking sheet), uncooked side down. Arrange pie so that half of it is over high heat and other half is over medium-low. Cook pizza another 3–5 minutes, rotating it in ¼ turns about every 30–45 seconds. This may sound awkward, but becomes second nature very quickly. Using spatula to lift edge slightly, check bottom during last minute or two, rotating a bit faster or slower if needed, to get a uniformly brown crisp crust. Scatter with basil shortly before removing pizza from grill. Slice pizza into wedges and serve immediately. The Hand Test: The effective way to measure heat on the grill’s surface is to place your hand a couple of inches above the top of the cooking grate and count the number of seconds before you have to pull it away. One to 2 seconds signifies hot, and 5–6 seconds is mediumlow, with other temperatures in between. Pizza Dough for the Grill The crust for a grilled pizza should be a supporting player, but an important one. You can use store-bought dough, but we’ve never found one that gives us the crispy, crunchy, flavorsome results that come from this homemade dough, which is a little stiffer than average. Makes two thin 11-inch pizza crusts 2 cups flour, preferably bread flour, or unbleached all-purpose flour (more as needed) 3 tablespoons cornmeal, preferably coarse ground 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon rapid-rise yeast such as Fleischmann’s ¾ cup lukewarm water 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon olive oil In food processor, pulse together flour, cornmeal, salt, and yeast. With motor running, add water and 2 tablespoons of oil. Continue processing for about 30 seconds more, until dough forms a fairly cohesive ball that is smooth and elastic. If it remains sticky, add another tablespoon or two of flour. Knead dough a few times on floured work surface, forming it into a ball. Pour remaining oil into large bowl and add dough, turning it around and over until coated with oil. Cover with damp cloth. Set dough in warm, draft-free spot and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour. Form dough into two thin disks, each about 1⁄8-inch thick and 11 inches in diameter. We find that a combination of first flattening crust with rolling pin and then stretching and prodding it with fingers works best. (A raised edge isn’t necessary.) Dough is ready to use at this point, but also can be saved in refrigerator or freezer for later. Stack crusts on baking sheet covered with wax paper, and place another sheet of wax paper between crusts. If refrigerating or freezing, chill crusts on baking sheet for about 30 minutes to firm dough, then remove from baking sheet and wrap crusts before storing. Bring crusts back to room temperature before proceeding. Adapted from 100 Grilling Recipes You Can’t Live Without © 2014 Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison, Harvard Common Press. Rooftop alfresco dining and drinks strikes me as elevated in all ways. The higher perspective gives a broader look down at streetscapes and bubbling fountains. It allows gazes to soar upward and, here, that means panoramas of mountaintops and fiery sunsets. Meals taste better outdoors, especially in New Mexico’s blue-sky, bug-free outdoors. Once lilacs and crabapples burst into bloom, it’s time to go up on the roof. Here’s a selection of my choices for this spring and summer. Amore Neapolitan Pizzeria On Amore’s University of New Mexico–area rooftop, you might indeed “see the moon hit the sky like a big pizza pie.” It was love, actually, that struck Gabriel and Kimberly Amador when they met in Naples, Italy. Gabe had accompanied his parents for a business move and met Kim, who was serving in the NATO forces. Planning their future, they decided to train as Neapolitan pizzaiolos , and open a true Naples-style pizzeria when they landed back in the United States. The Amadors are certified by the Associazione Pizzaiuoli Napoletani, which is a big deal. Kim is one of the small number of women who has been trained not just to make the dough, but also to be a fornaia , the tender of the pizzas in the wood-fired oven. Even though Amore has been in business less than a year, it serves the best pizza in New Mexico, and I don’t say that lightly.The care the Amadors put into the pizzas and other dishes shows a real commitment to quality. The scarlet mosaic-tiled pizza oven, named Sophia, is nearly as drop-dead gorgeous as its namesake Italian actress. Extra-fine 00 Caputo flour, legendary in the food world, is sourced directly from Naples, as are the San Marzano tomatoes. Just about everything else that can be found locally is used, from the fresh basil for the margherita pies to the pecans for the Waldorf salad. Gabe and Kim even made an arrangement with a local tree service to cut standing dead wood, usually ash or oak, to burn in the oven for the blistering fires needed to almost instantly cook the thin pizzas. The staff stays lean from running hot pizza, beer, and wine up to the third-floor deck, which captures a panorama from the Sandías to the sunset. Launched last summer, there’s lots to love about Amore. 2929 Monte Vista NE; (505) 554-1967; amoreabq.com Seasons Rooftop Cantina The terrace atop Seasons overlooks an intimate plaza enlivened by a splashing Mexican fountain. Some of the handsome upper level is enclosed, with a semi-circular bar counter that beckons. However, the action’s really out and around, on the surrounding cantina terrace, and in a connected outdoor room, where a pair of garage doors sweep upward to open the space to the breezes. Locals know Seasons for its rooftop live jazz, which kicks off as the days lengthen. On the fringe of Old Town, Seasons sits back a bit from its Mountain Road address. The building is contemporary adobe style, with a brightly painted indoor dining room on the ground level. On nearly every wall, abstracted Southwestern landscape paintings by Albuquerque resident Kevin Tolman catch the eye. In this downstairs space, Chef Paul Mandigo serves a well-crafted menu of upscale dishes such as rotisserie chicken with kale-and-pumpkin seed coleslaw, or prime rib with green-chile mashed potatoes. You can have those dishes served to you upstairs on the rooftop, or choose from the more casual “cantina” fare. Think red lentil hummus (recipe at mynm.us/rc-hummus) and pita wedges, and tacos filled with sautéed cilantro-lime shrimp, or carne asada with Moroccan hot sauce. If there’s a grilled chicken sandwich topped with a haystack of crispy onion strings offered as a special when you go, be sure to order it, as it’s among the top sandwiches I’ve eaten this year. Along with the eats, order a pitcher of housemade sangria, or maybe a mojito, while you watch stars emerge in the night sky. 2031 Mountain Rd. NW; (505) 766-5100; seasonsabq.com Apothecary Bar and Lounge, Hotel Parq Central The Hotel Parq Central, near I-25’s intersection with Central Avenue, is one of my top choices when I stay in Albuquerque. Steffany Hollingsworth and HVL Interiors from Santa Fe put together an inspired, comfortably chic design—cleanly contemporary while linking clearly to the past. The four-story building was orignally a hospital, and the design throughout it playfully hints at that history, especially in the rooftop Apothecary Bar and Lounge. Humorous touches include an antique surgery table for bar nibbles and a wall full of fascinating old medicine-bottle labels. Some striking vintage apothecary jars line the lighted back bar. Mark Encinias, the hotel’s genial food and beverage director, also serves as the head mixologist. He loves creating seasonal cocktails such as the refreshing Sangre de Naranja Margarita, Flying Figs, and Rosemary Gin Fizz (recipes on p. 56). Accompanying nibbles are simple, perhaps a selection of olives with Manchego cheese, chips with housemade salsa and red chile queso, or sesame-crusted calamari with green chile–chive aioli. Apothecary’s terrace views, especially toward the west at sunset, may make you forget all about eating. The open-air terrace is spacious, with lots of cushy Dedon lounge chairs, and blankets if there’s a chill in the air. 806 Central Ave. SE; (505) 242-0040; hotelparqcentral.com Ibiza, Hotel Andaluz You may remember that my February column mentioned James Campbell Caruso taking over the restaurant Más, at the Andaluz. The esteemed Santa Fe chef and multiple James Beard Best Southwest Chef Award nominee also oversees food and drink at the rooftop bar, Ibiza. A substantial fire-emitting sculpture greets guests stepping out onto this large, sleek second-floor terrace. Scattered vine-draped wire ramadas surround some of the tables. The rooftop is perfectly sited to take in the enormous swath of eastern sky and the Sandía Mountains, which turn ruddy from reflected light as the sun sets. Along with the full bar, Chef James serves up Spanish nibbles such as warm bacon-wrapped dates, and cocas, pizza-like Mallorcan flatbreads. 125 Second St. NW; (505) 923-9033; hotelandaluz.com Flying Figs This and the following two recipes come from Apothecary at Hotel Parq Central. Mark Encinias, the head mixologist, created all three refreshers. Makes 1 2 slices fresh fig ½ ounce St. Germain liqueur 1½ ounces vodka 1 ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ ounce agave nectar Small mint sprig Muddle together fig and St. Germain in cocktail mixing glass or shaker. Add vodka, lemon juice, agave nectar, and several ice cubes. Shake well and strain into chilled 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Garnish with mint and serve. Note: If you can’t find fresh figs, cut off 2 slices of a dried fig and soak them in the St. Germain for 5 minutes before muddling. Sangre de Naranja Margarita This margarita gets its fetchingly pale sunset hue partially from a Sicilian blood-orange liqueur available in well-stocked liquor stores. The liqueur’s flavor is a bit more bittersweet and zestier than common orange liqueurs such as triple sec, Cointreau, or Citronge. Any of these may be substituted in a pinch, if you wish. Just bump up the grenadine a touch to add more color. Don’t overdo it, though, or the drink will become too sweet. Makes 1 Lime wedge and kosher salt 1. ounces silver tequila, such as Sauza Blue ½ ounce Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur 1 ounce agave nectar 1 ounce freshly squeezed lime juice 1 ounce freshly squeezed orange juice ¼ ounce grenadine Rub lime wedge around edge of 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Dip glass rim in salt. Combine the remaining ingredients in cocktail shaker with several ice cubes. Shake well and strain into prepared glass. Serve. Rosemary Gin Fizz Apothecary whips up this summery fizz with Beefeater Gin, but I prefer to use KGB Hacienda Gin, from here in New Mexico. Makes 1 Rosemary Syrup 1 cup water 1 cup sugar 5 large fresh rosemary sprigs   1½ ounces gin 1 ounce rosemary syrup ¾ ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice 1½ ounces soda water Lemon slice Small fresh rosemary sprig Make rosemary syrup. Combine ingredients in small saucepan and simmer 5 minutes. Let mixture sit until cool. Strain out rosemary. Refrigerate unneeded syrup in covered jar. It keeps for weeks. Combine in cocktail shaker gin, syrup, lemon juice, and several ice cubes. Shake well. Place several fresh ice cubes in 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Strain cocktail mixture over ice, and add soda. Garnish with lemon slice and rosemary sprig, and serve. Cheryl Alters Jamison is New Mexico Magazine ’s contributing culinary editor. Read her blog at nmmagazine.com/tastingnm . As of late April, you can order her latest book, The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition , from the New Mexico Magazine Store at shopnm.co/ChimayoCookbook . See more of Douglas Merriam ’s work at douglasmerriam.com .","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f977","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/tasting-nm-85847/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/tasting-nm-85847/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/tasting-nm-85847/","metaTitle":"Up on the Roof","metaDescription":"
Grilled Pizza with Fire-Roasted Tomato Sauce
Pizza-oven pizza is wonderful in restaurants, but not many of us have a special high-heat oven at home to get similar results. Using a grill, either
","cleanDescription":"Grilled Pizza with Fire-Roasted Tomato Sauce Pizza-oven pizza is wonderful in restaurants, but not many of us have a special high-heat oven at home to get similar results. Using a grill, either charcoal or gas, is the best way to emulate pizza-oven pizza. Grilled pizza should be made like a Neapolitan pie, with a thin crust and a relatively light load of toppings. This recipe doubles up on the grilled flavor with a homemade sauce of fire-charred tomatoes. I’ve also included a scattering of fresh basil common to a margherita pizza, but other room temperature or warm toppings can be added. Just use a light hand, since the quick cooking time doesn’t allow for toppings to thoroughly heat on the grill. Makes two 11-inch pizzas Fire-Roasted Tomato Sauce 3 red-ripe plum tomatoes 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon flavorful extra-virgin olive oil Splash or two of garlic-flavored oil, optional Salt   Pizza Dough for the Grill 6 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced and blotted of moisture (preferred) or 1¼ cups grated mozzarella Pinch or two of crushed, dried hot red chile, optional ½ cup lightly packed thin-sliced fresh basil leaves Fire up grill for a two-level fire capable of cooking at the same time on both high heat (1–2 seconds with the hand test) and medium-low heat (5–6 seconds with the hand test). Grill tomatoes over high heat about 6 to 8 minutes, turning on all sides, until skins are somewhat blackened and split, and tomatoes are soft. As soon as tomatoes are cool enough to handle, halve them and squeeze out watery liquid. Purée tomatoes in a blender or food processor with remaining sauce ingredients. Place tomato sauce, mozzarella, optional chile, and basil within easy reach of grill. Have baking sheet near grill on convenient work surface, and have large spatula or pizza peel handy. Place first crust on grill, laying it directly on cooking grate. Grill uncovered over high heat for 1–1½ minutes, until crust becomes firm yet still flexible. Don’t worry about any bubbles that form on crust, as they will be flattened when you turn over crust in next step. Flip crust onto baking sheet, cooked side up. Immediately spoon on one-half of tomato sauce, and sprinkle with one half of cheese and, if you wish, a bit of chile. Quickly return pizza to grill (without baking sheet), uncooked side down. Arrange pie so that half of it is over high heat and other half is over medium-low. Cook pizza another 3–5 minutes, rotating it in ¼ turns about every 30–45 seconds. This may sound awkward, but becomes second nature very quickly. Using spatula to lift edge slightly, check bottom during last minute or two, rotating a bit faster or slower if needed, to get a uniformly brown crisp crust. Scatter with basil shortly before removing pizza from grill. Slice pizza into wedges and serve immediately. The Hand Test: The effective way to measure heat on the grill’s surface is to place your hand a couple of inches above the top of the cooking grate and count the number of seconds before you have to pull it away. One to 2 seconds signifies hot, and 5–6 seconds is mediumlow, with other temperatures in between. Pizza Dough for the Grill The crust for a grilled pizza should be a supporting player, but an important one. You can use store-bought dough, but we’ve never found one that gives us the crispy, crunchy, flavorsome results that come from this homemade dough, which is a little stiffer than average. Makes two thin 11-inch pizza crusts 2 cups flour, preferably bread flour, or unbleached all-purpose flour (more as needed) 3 tablespoons cornmeal, preferably coarse ground 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon rapid-rise yeast such as Fleischmann’s ¾ cup lukewarm water 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon olive oil In food processor, pulse together flour, cornmeal, salt, and yeast. With motor running, add water and 2 tablespoons of oil. Continue processing for about 30 seconds more, until dough forms a fairly cohesive ball that is smooth and elastic. If it remains sticky, add another tablespoon or two of flour. Knead dough a few times on floured work surface, forming it into a ball. Pour remaining oil into large bowl and add dough, turning it around and over until coated with oil. Cover with damp cloth. Set dough in warm, draft-free spot and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour. Form dough into two thin disks, each about 1⁄8-inch thick and 11 inches in diameter. We find that a combination of first flattening crust with rolling pin and then stretching and prodding it with fingers works best. (A raised edge isn’t necessary.) Dough is ready to use at this point, but also can be saved in refrigerator or freezer for later. Stack crusts on baking sheet covered with wax paper, and place another sheet of wax paper between crusts. If refrigerating or freezing, chill crusts on baking sheet for about 30 minutes to firm dough, then remove from baking sheet and wrap crusts before storing. Bring crusts back to room temperature before proceeding. Adapted from 100 Grilling Recipes You Can’t Live Without © 2014 Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison, Harvard Common Press. Rooftop alfresco dining and drinks strikes me as elevated in all ways. The higher perspective gives a broader look down at streetscapes and bubbling fountains. It allows gazes to soar upward and, here, that means panoramas of mountaintops and fiery sunsets. Meals taste better outdoors, especially in New Mexico’s blue-sky, bug-free outdoors. Once lilacs and crabapples burst into bloom, it’s time to go up on the roof. Here’s a selection of my choices for this spring and summer. Amore Neapolitan Pizzeria On Amore’s University of New Mexico–area rooftop, you might indeed “see the moon hit the sky like a big pizza pie.” It was love, actually, that struck Gabriel and Kimberly Amador when they met in Naples, Italy. Gabe had accompanied his parents for a business move and met Kim, who was serving in the NATO forces. Planning their future, they decided to train as Neapolitan pizzaiolos , and open a true Naples-style pizzeria when they landed back in the United States. The Amadors are certified by the Associazione Pizzaiuoli Napoletani, which is a big deal. Kim is one of the small number of women who has been trained not just to make the dough, but also to be a fornaia , the tender of the pizzas in the wood-fired oven. Even though Amore has been in business less than a year, it serves the best pizza in New Mexico, and I don’t say that lightly.The care the Amadors put into the pizzas and other dishes shows a real commitment to quality. The scarlet mosaic-tiled pizza oven, named Sophia, is nearly as drop-dead gorgeous as its namesake Italian actress. Extra-fine 00 Caputo flour, legendary in the food world, is sourced directly from Naples, as are the San Marzano tomatoes. Just about everything else that can be found locally is used, from the fresh basil for the margherita pies to the pecans for the Waldorf salad. Gabe and Kim even made an arrangement with a local tree service to cut standing dead wood, usually ash or oak, to burn in the oven for the blistering fires needed to almost instantly cook the thin pizzas. The staff stays lean from running hot pizza, beer, and wine up to the third-floor deck, which captures a panorama from the Sandías to the sunset. Launched last summer, there’s lots to love about Amore. 2929 Monte Vista NE; (505) 554-1967; amoreabq.com Seasons Rooftop Cantina The terrace atop Seasons overlooks an intimate plaza enlivened by a splashing Mexican fountain. Some of the handsome upper level is enclosed, with a semi-circular bar counter that beckons. However, the action’s really out and around, on the surrounding cantina terrace, and in a connected outdoor room, where a pair of garage doors sweep upward to open the space to the breezes. Locals know Seasons for its rooftop live jazz, which kicks off as the days lengthen. On the fringe of Old Town, Seasons sits back a bit from its Mountain Road address. The building is contemporary adobe style, with a brightly painted indoor dining room on the ground level. On nearly every wall, abstracted Southwestern landscape paintings by Albuquerque resident Kevin Tolman catch the eye. In this downstairs space, Chef Paul Mandigo serves a well-crafted menu of upscale dishes such as rotisserie chicken with kale-and-pumpkin seed coleslaw, or prime rib with green-chile mashed potatoes. You can have those dishes served to you upstairs on the rooftop, or choose from the more casual “cantina” fare. Think red lentil hummus (recipe at mynm.us/rc-hummus) and pita wedges, and tacos filled with sautéed cilantro-lime shrimp, or carne asada with Moroccan hot sauce. If there’s a grilled chicken sandwich topped with a haystack of crispy onion strings offered as a special when you go, be sure to order it, as it’s among the top sandwiches I’ve eaten this year. Along with the eats, order a pitcher of housemade sangria, or maybe a mojito, while you watch stars emerge in the night sky. 2031 Mountain Rd. NW; (505) 766-5100; seasonsabq.com Apothecary Bar and Lounge, Hotel Parq Central The Hotel Parq Central, near I-25’s intersection with Central Avenue, is one of my top choices when I stay in Albuquerque. Steffany Hollingsworth and HVL Interiors from Santa Fe put together an inspired, comfortably chic design—cleanly contemporary while linking clearly to the past. The four-story building was orignally a hospital, and the design throughout it playfully hints at that history, especially in the rooftop Apothecary Bar and Lounge. Humorous touches include an antique surgery table for bar nibbles and a wall full of fascinating old medicine-bottle labels. Some striking vintage apothecary jars line the lighted back bar. Mark Encinias, the hotel’s genial food and beverage director, also serves as the head mixologist. He loves creating seasonal cocktails such as the refreshing Sangre de Naranja Margarita, Flying Figs, and Rosemary Gin Fizz (recipes on p. 56). Accompanying nibbles are simple, perhaps a selection of olives with Manchego cheese, chips with housemade salsa and red chile queso, or sesame-crusted calamari with green chile–chive aioli. Apothecary’s terrace views, especially toward the west at sunset, may make you forget all about eating. The open-air terrace is spacious, with lots of cushy Dedon lounge chairs, and blankets if there’s a chill in the air. 806 Central Ave. SE; (505) 242-0040; hotelparqcentral.com Ibiza, Hotel Andaluz You may remember that my February column mentioned James Campbell Caruso taking over the restaurant Más, at the Andaluz. The esteemed Santa Fe chef and multiple James Beard Best Southwest Chef Award nominee also oversees food and drink at the rooftop bar, Ibiza. A substantial fire-emitting sculpture greets guests stepping out onto this large, sleek second-floor terrace. Scattered vine-draped wire ramadas surround some of the tables. The rooftop is perfectly sited to take in the enormous swath of eastern sky and the Sandía Mountains, which turn ruddy from reflected light as the sun sets. Along with the full bar, Chef James serves up Spanish nibbles such as warm bacon-wrapped dates, and cocas, pizza-like Mallorcan flatbreads. 125 Second St. NW; (505) 923-9033; hotelandaluz.com Flying Figs This and the following two recipes come from Apothecary at Hotel Parq Central. Mark Encinias, the head mixologist, created all three refreshers. Makes 1 2 slices fresh fig ½ ounce St. Germain liqueur 1½ ounces vodka 1 ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ ounce agave nectar Small mint sprig Muddle together fig and St. Germain in cocktail mixing glass or shaker. Add vodka, lemon juice, agave nectar, and several ice cubes. Shake well and strain into chilled 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Garnish with mint and serve. Note: If you can’t find fresh figs, cut off 2 slices of a dried fig and soak them in the St. Germain for 5 minutes before muddling. Sangre de Naranja Margarita This margarita gets its fetchingly pale sunset hue partially from a Sicilian blood-orange liqueur available in well-stocked liquor stores. The liqueur’s flavor is a bit more bittersweet and zestier than common orange liqueurs such as triple sec, Cointreau, or Citronge. Any of these may be substituted in a pinch, if you wish. Just bump up the grenadine a touch to add more color. Don’t overdo it, though, or the drink will become too sweet. Makes 1 Lime wedge and kosher salt 1. ounces silver tequila, such as Sauza Blue ½ ounce Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur 1 ounce agave nectar 1 ounce freshly squeezed lime juice 1 ounce freshly squeezed orange juice ¼ ounce grenadine Rub lime wedge around edge of 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Dip glass rim in salt. Combine the remaining ingredients in cocktail shaker with several ice cubes. Shake well and strain into prepared glass. Serve. Rosemary Gin Fizz Apothecary whips up this summery fizz with Beefeater Gin, but I prefer to use KGB Hacienda Gin, from here in New Mexico. Makes 1 Rosemary Syrup 1 cup water 1 cup sugar 5 large fresh rosemary sprigs   1½ ounces gin 1 ounce rosemary syrup ¾ ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice 1½ ounces soda water Lemon slice Small fresh rosemary sprig Make rosemary syrup. Combine ingredients in small saucepan and simmer 5 minutes. Let mixture sit until cool. Strain out rosemary. Refrigerate unneeded syrup in covered jar. It keeps for weeks. Combine in cocktail shaker gin, syrup, lemon juice, and several ice cubes. Shake well. Place several fresh ice cubes in 8- to 10-ounce rocks glass. Strain cocktail mixture over ice, and add soda. Garnish with lemon slice and rosemary sprig, and serve. Cheryl Alters Jamison is New Mexico Magazine ’s contributing culinary editor. Read her blog at nmmagazine.com/tastingnm . As of late April, you can order her latest book, The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition , from the New Mexico Magazine Store at shopnm.co/ChimayoCookbook . See more of Douglas Merriam ’s work at douglasmerriam.com .","publish_start_moment":"2014-05-06T11:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:56:12.341Z"}]});

Posts from May 2014