acequia and clouds
","teaser_raw":"

Log On

Three must-have apps and a go-to website to power your adventure:
Ski & Snow Report (Free)
Snow conditions, weather forecasts, trail maps, and more for 2,000-plus ski areas, including nine in

","version_id":"59f8ebb2648901d6cd725cf3","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","blog":"magazine","name":"Whitney Dreier","_name_sort":"whitney dreier","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.428Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.436Z","_totalPosts":5,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"Whitney Dreier","slug":"whitney-dreier","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/#comments","totalPosts":5},"categories":[{"_id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","title":"Travel","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"travel","updated":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.155Z","created":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.156Z","_totalPosts":188,"id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","slug":"travel","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/#comments","totalPosts":188},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","blog":"magazine","title":"Going Places","_title_sort":"going places","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.493Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.506Z","_totalPosts":78,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","slug":"going-places","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/going-places/58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/going-places/58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4/#comments","totalPosts":78},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f306","blog":"magazine","title":"November 2013","_title_sort":"november 2013","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.592Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.599Z","_totalPosts":10,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f306","slug":"november-2013","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/november-2013/58b4b2404c2774661570f306/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/november-2013/58b4b2404c2774661570f306/#comments","totalPosts":10}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2474c2774661570f470","legacy_id":"84069","title":"Main","created":"2013-11-06T13:22:23.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:06.484Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"main","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/main_2d877803-99cc-429a-af03-63ffc208b676","version":1488237127,"signature":"8212994c1ea1f1685c545c3db169ba40524f99de","width":488,"height":325,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:07.000Z","bytes":77313,"type":"upload","etag":"8c735395f72ab67534fe226ce7d55930","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237127/clients/newmexico/main_2d877803-99cc-429a-af03-63ffc208b676.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237127/clients/newmexico/main_2d877803-99cc-429a-af03-63ffc208b676.jpg","exif":{"Copyright":"Copyright Chris McLennan. Not to be used or published in any way or form without a written license"},"original_filename":"main"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2474c2774661570f470","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/main_2d877803-99cc-429a-af03-63ffc208b676"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Main"},"tags":[{"_id":"59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20","title":"Events","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"events","updated":"2017-05-02T22:48:09.170Z","created":"2017-05-02T22:48:09.171Z","_totalPosts":62,"id":"59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20","slug":"events","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/tag/events/59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/tag/events/59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20/#comments","totalPosts":62}],"teaser":"

Log On

Three must-have apps and a go-to website to power your adventure:
Ski & Snow Report (Free)
Snow conditions, weather forecasts, trail maps, and more for 2,000-plus ski areas, including nine in

","description":"Log On Three must-have apps and a go-to website to power your adventure: Ski & Snow Report (Free) Snow conditions, weather forecasts, trail maps, and more for 2,000-plus ski areas, including nine in New Mexico. onthesnow.com NOAA Hi-Def Radar ($1.99) This iTunes app delivers real-time weather-radar images that let you know if it’s safe to keep playing or time to pack it in. Ski Tracks GPS Track Recorder ($0.99) Track your runs, max speed, altitude, feet of vertical, and more, and at the end of the day, share it all on Facebook. skinewmexico.com This website by Ski New Mexico compiles information from eight member ski areas. The homepage provides snow totals for all resorts, as well as upcoming events, YouTube videos, and live webcam shots. The website of each ski area is just a click away, as are Ski New Mexico’s Facebook and Twitter pages. facebook.com/skinewmexico @skinewmexico SNOWSHOES ON Snowshoeing is another great way to enjoy winter weather while having fun and feeling the burn. These days, thanks to aluminum frames and plastic decking, snowshoes are much lighter and less cumbersome than the wood-and-leather rackets worn in centuries past. Snowshoe anywhere you’d normally hike, or opt for locations such as the Valles Caldera National Preserve (505-661-3333; vallescaldera.gov ), or the Enchanted Forest Cross-Country Ski and Snowshoe Area (EFXC) (575-754-6112; enchantedforestxc.com ), near Red River, which cater to New Mexico’s ever-growing population of snowshoers. Valles Caldera even offers night snowshoeing; on January 12, you can trek around the ancient volcano by the light of the almost-full moon. If you’re not sure where to start, EFXC offers a snowshoe clinic and fun run (December 7–8) where you can learn everything from proper snowshoeing technique to what to wear for hiking or racing. Many sporting-goods stores, such as REI, also offer snowshoe rentals and tips for beginners. If you get hooked—and are feeling speedy—the Santa Fe Snowshoe Classic (January 4) is a 5K race on the Norski Track Ski Trail, off Hyde Park Road. EFXC’s Low O 2 Challenge (January 26) is a 5/10K event over singletrack and groomed trail; top finishers qualify for the U.S. Snowshoe Association’s national championship event in Vermont. ✜ Dust off the ski boots, try on the gear, and get ready for another fun-filled winter spent slashing down New Mexico’s various ski slopes. According to George Brooks, executive director of Ski New Mexico, “Natural snow usually starts in late October and early November.” Combining Mother Nature’s fluffy stuff with machine-made snow allows five of the state’s nine alpine ski areas to open this month. The rest follow soon thereafter. “With a healthy snowfall, New Mexico skiing is outstanding—light dry snow, blue skies, no crowds,” says Kevin Brennan, who blogs about all things outdoors at HighDesertDirt.blogspot.com . So whether you’re a big-mountain skier in search of fresh powder or a beginner looking for family-friendly slopes, there are plenty of options around the state. If you prefer cross-country skiing and snowshoeing, we’ve got intel on those activities as well. ANGEL FIRE The only place to night ski in New Mexico. OPENS: December 13 STATS: Average Snowfall – 158”; Base Elevation – 8,600’; Peak Elevation – 10,677’; Vertical Drop – 2,077’ WHAT’S NEW: Powder City is a new front-of-the-mountain terrain park that stays open late for night skiing and snowboarding. DON’T MISS: Give your skis a break and slide down the mountain on a shovel instead. The Shovel Races Championship (February 7–8) are as silly—and as serious—as the name implies. Top competitors go nearly 80 mph. (575) 377-6401; angelfireresort.com PAJARITO MOUNTAIN SKI AREA Ski the Jémez—downhill or cross-country. OPENS: Early December. STATS: Average Snowfall – 103”; Base Elevation – 9,200’; Peak Elevation – 10,400’; Vertical Drop – 1,200’ WHAT’S NEW: The Pajarito Brewpub & Grill, in downtown Los Alamos, serves up the best food in town and stays open late. You’ll enjoy the ski décor and the vast beer menu. DON’T MISS: Torchlight Parade (December 31). At dusk, Pajarito staff ski down the mountain holding torches, while visitors enjoy drinks and snacks on the deck.You can also access cross-country skiing trails on Forest Service land from Pajarito’s parking lot. These trails are maintained by the Southwest Nordic Ski Club (swnordicski.org). (505) 662-5725; skipajarito.com RED RIVER SKI AREA Mining town turned ski town—that likes to party. OPENS: November 27 STATS: Average Snowfall – 156”; Base Elevation – 8,750’; Peak Elevation – 10,350’; Vertical Drop – 1,600’ WHAT’S NEW: The UNM Corporate Ski Cup has a new name: the UNM Ultimate Ski & Snowboard Challenge . On January 18, 2014, compete alongside Lobo athletes in up to three races. Can’t make this weekend? The series comes to Angel Fire on January 25, Santa Fe on February 22, and Taos on March 1. DON’T MISS: From a crawfish boil to a gator plunge, Mardi Gras in the Mountains (February 27–March 4) is a week of wild fun. (575) 754-2223; redriverskiarea.com SANDÍA PEAK SKI AREA Small mountain, big views, only 25 minutes from the Sunport. OPENS: Late November (weather permitting). STATS: Average Snowfall – 118”; Base Elevation – 8,678’; Peak Elevation – 10,378’; Vertical Drop – 1,700’ WHAT’S NEW: High Finance Restaurant, atop Sandía Peak, now accepts lunch and dinner reservations through opentable.com. DON’T MISS: Because Sandía doesn’t get as much powder as other resorts, it’s best to check their website before making plans. Snowshoeing, however, is almost always an option. Consider the Sandía Peak Snowshoe Race (January 18), which offers spectacular views of the Duke City, the Río Grande, and the Turquoise Trail. See sidebar (p. 18) for more snowshoeing opportunities. (505) 242-9052; sandiapeak.com SIPAPU SKI RESORT Uncrowded slopes, family-friendly atmosphere. OPENS: November 16 (Sipapu’s earliest opening ever, and the 11th straight year the resort has been the first ski area to open in New Mexico). STATS: Average Snowfall – 190”; Base Elevation – 8,200’; Peak Elevation – 9,255’; Vertical Drop – 1,055’ WHAT’S NEW: Fourth- and fifth-graders ski free every day (report card required). Kids six and younger, active-duty military, and adults ski free, as do those aged 40, 60, 70, and older (special promotion). DON’T MISS: Forget about sand castles. February Fun Fest , a free event held President’s Day weekend (February 15–17), boasts a multistory snow castle that’s full of slides, steps, and tunnels. “No one else in New Mexico builds anything like this,” says marketing director Stacey Glaser. “It takes our mountain crews a full week to create it!” In addition to the castle, the weekend includes scavenger hunts, a costume parade, face painting, and games. (800) 587-2240; sipapunm.com SKI APACHE The southernmost ski resort in the country—and it has a new gondola. OPENS: November 28 STATS: Average snowfall – 149”; Base Elevation – 9,600’; Peak Elevation – 11,500’; Vertical Drop – 1,900’ WHAT’S NEW: Ski Apache’s 51-year-old passenger gondola was retired in January and replaced with the Apache Arrow, a new, high-speed, Doppelmayr gondola. The vessel carries eight passengers to 11,500 feet twice as fast as the old lift. In addition, four swift new ski lifts will whisk 3,600 more skiers to trail heads hourly. DON’T MISS: Gather together a team of five for the Ski Apache Cup and Vertical Challenge (mid-January). See how many vertical feet you can total in four hours. Unwind afterward at the Inn of the Mountain Gods. (575) 464-3600; skiapache.com SKI CLOUDCROFT Celebrating 50 years of southern skiing in the Sacramento Mountains. OPENS: December STATS: Average Snowfall – 57”; Base Elevation – 8,350’; Peak Elevation – 9,050’; Vertical Drop – 700’ WHAT’S NEW: Ski Cloudcroft has been operating since 1963. This year the resort celebrates 50 years with great skiing (weather permitting; no snow-making) and new activities (check Facebook for updates). The Silver Spoon Ski School and Mustard’s Last Stand restaurant are as good as ever. DON’T MISS: Cloudcroft might be small (fewer than 800 residents), but holidays are a big deal here. Bring an ornament to decorate the tree at the Lighted Christmas Parade & Tree Lighting (December 7), or chow down on Cajun cuisine during Mardi Gras in the Clouds (February 28–March 2). (575) 682-2333; skicloudcroft.net SKI SANTA FE A sunny slope only 20 minutes from the capital city. OPENS: November 28 STATS: Average Snowfall – 189”; Base Elevation – 10,350’; Peak Elevation – 12,075’; Vertical Drop – 1,725’ WHAT’S NEW: The recently renovated La Casa Lodge features a new rental facility that offers more than 1,000 sets of Head skis and Burton snowboard equipment, plus boots, poles, helmets, and more. The lodge’s spiffy new food court features a bakery and a pasta bar. DON’T MISS: Rando skiing, which combines aspects of alpine, telemark, and backcountry skiing with mountaineering, is all the rage among winter-sports buffs, and Ski Santa Fe is offering the state’s first competition. The Santa Fe Fireball Rando Race (February 8) is approximately 4,200 feet and includes multiple ascents on climbing skins and at least one bootpack. (505) 982-4429; skisantafe.com TAOS SKI VALLEY Big-mountain skiing. OPENS: November 28 STATS: Average Snowfall – 236”; Base Elevation – 9,207’; Peak Elevation – 12,481’; Vertical Drop – 2,612’ WHAT’S NEW: The upcoming December issue will include a report on exciting new developments in the works at TSV. DON’T MISS: With both a ski event and a benefit auction, Breast Cancer Awareness Day takes place February 22. During the K2 Bumps Challenge , teams of two ski Al’s Run as many times as possible in four hours. That evening, bidders can take home snowboards that have been painted by local artists during the Paint for Peaks Art Auction. The Salomon Extreme Freeride Championships (February 27–March 1) showcase some of the best double-diamond terrain in the country. Over 150 athletes compete for more than $15,000 in prizes. (575) 776-2291; skitaos.org Snow reports provided by OnTheSnow. The snow report widget is most likely not displaying because you have JavaScript disabled. To see the Ski Report for every ski area in the world visit OnTheSnow or click on these popular regions: Red River Taos Ski Valley Angel Fire Resort Ski Santa Fe","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f919","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/powder-to-the-people-84067/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/powder-to-the-people-84067/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/powder-to-the-people-84067/","metaTitle":"Powder to the People","metaDescription":"

Log On

Three must-have apps and a go-to website to power your adventure:
Ski & Snow Report (Free)
Snow conditions, weather forecasts, trail maps, and more for 2,000-plus ski areas, including nine in

","cleanDescription":"Log On Three must-have apps and a go-to website to power your adventure: Ski & Snow Report (Free) Snow conditions, weather forecasts, trail maps, and more for 2,000-plus ski areas, including nine in New Mexico. onthesnow.com NOAA Hi-Def Radar ($1.99) This iTunes app delivers real-time weather-radar images that let you know if it’s safe to keep playing or time to pack it in. Ski Tracks GPS Track Recorder ($0.99) Track your runs, max speed, altitude, feet of vertical, and more, and at the end of the day, share it all on Facebook. skinewmexico.com This website by Ski New Mexico compiles information from eight member ski areas. The homepage provides snow totals for all resorts, as well as upcoming events, YouTube videos, and live webcam shots. The website of each ski area is just a click away, as are Ski New Mexico’s Facebook and Twitter pages. facebook.com/skinewmexico @skinewmexico SNOWSHOES ON Snowshoeing is another great way to enjoy winter weather while having fun and feeling the burn. These days, thanks to aluminum frames and plastic decking, snowshoes are much lighter and less cumbersome than the wood-and-leather rackets worn in centuries past. Snowshoe anywhere you’d normally hike, or opt for locations such as the Valles Caldera National Preserve (505-661-3333; vallescaldera.gov ), or the Enchanted Forest Cross-Country Ski and Snowshoe Area (EFXC) (575-754-6112; enchantedforestxc.com ), near Red River, which cater to New Mexico’s ever-growing population of snowshoers. Valles Caldera even offers night snowshoeing; on January 12, you can trek around the ancient volcano by the light of the almost-full moon. If you’re not sure where to start, EFXC offers a snowshoe clinic and fun run (December 7–8) where you can learn everything from proper snowshoeing technique to what to wear for hiking or racing. Many sporting-goods stores, such as REI, also offer snowshoe rentals and tips for beginners. If you get hooked—and are feeling speedy—the Santa Fe Snowshoe Classic (January 4) is a 5K race on the Norski Track Ski Trail, off Hyde Park Road. EFXC’s Low O 2 Challenge (January 26) is a 5/10K event over singletrack and groomed trail; top finishers qualify for the U.S. Snowshoe Association’s national championship event in Vermont. ✜ Dust off the ski boots, try on the gear, and get ready for another fun-filled winter spent slashing down New Mexico’s various ski slopes. According to George Brooks, executive director of Ski New Mexico, “Natural snow usually starts in late October and early November.” Combining Mother Nature’s fluffy stuff with machine-made snow allows five of the state’s nine alpine ski areas to open this month. The rest follow soon thereafter. “With a healthy snowfall, New Mexico skiing is outstanding—light dry snow, blue skies, no crowds,” says Kevin Brennan, who blogs about all things outdoors at HighDesertDirt.blogspot.com . So whether you’re a big-mountain skier in search of fresh powder or a beginner looking for family-friendly slopes, there are plenty of options around the state. If you prefer cross-country skiing and snowshoeing, we’ve got intel on those activities as well. ANGEL FIRE The only place to night ski in New Mexico. OPENS: December 13 STATS: Average Snowfall – 158”; Base Elevation – 8,600’; Peak Elevation – 10,677’; Vertical Drop – 2,077’ WHAT’S NEW: Powder City is a new front-of-the-mountain terrain park that stays open late for night skiing and snowboarding. DON’T MISS: Give your skis a break and slide down the mountain on a shovel instead. The Shovel Races Championship (February 7–8) are as silly—and as serious—as the name implies. Top competitors go nearly 80 mph. (575) 377-6401; angelfireresort.com PAJARITO MOUNTAIN SKI AREA Ski the Jémez—downhill or cross-country. OPENS: Early December. STATS: Average Snowfall – 103”; Base Elevation – 9,200’; Peak Elevation – 10,400’; Vertical Drop – 1,200’ WHAT’S NEW: The Pajarito Brewpub & Grill, in downtown Los Alamos, serves up the best food in town and stays open late. You’ll enjoy the ski décor and the vast beer menu. DON’T MISS: Torchlight Parade (December 31). At dusk, Pajarito staff ski down the mountain holding torches, while visitors enjoy drinks and snacks on the deck.You can also access cross-country skiing trails on Forest Service land from Pajarito’s parking lot. These trails are maintained by the Southwest Nordic Ski Club (swnordicski.org). (505) 662-5725; skipajarito.com RED RIVER SKI AREA Mining town turned ski town—that likes to party. OPENS: November 27 STATS: Average Snowfall – 156”; Base Elevation – 8,750’; Peak Elevation – 10,350’; Vertical Drop – 1,600’ WHAT’S NEW: The UNM Corporate Ski Cup has a new name: the UNM Ultimate Ski & Snowboard Challenge . On January 18, 2014, compete alongside Lobo athletes in up to three races. Can’t make this weekend? The series comes to Angel Fire on January 25, Santa Fe on February 22, and Taos on March 1. DON’T MISS: From a crawfish boil to a gator plunge, Mardi Gras in the Mountains (February 27–March 4) is a week of wild fun. (575) 754-2223; redriverskiarea.com SANDÍA PEAK SKI AREA Small mountain, big views, only 25 minutes from the Sunport. OPENS: Late November (weather permitting). STATS: Average Snowfall – 118”; Base Elevation – 8,678’; Peak Elevation – 10,378’; Vertical Drop – 1,700’ WHAT’S NEW: High Finance Restaurant, atop Sandía Peak, now accepts lunch and dinner reservations through opentable.com. DON’T MISS: Because Sandía doesn’t get as much powder as other resorts, it’s best to check their website before making plans. Snowshoeing, however, is almost always an option. Consider the Sandía Peak Snowshoe Race (January 18), which offers spectacular views of the Duke City, the Río Grande, and the Turquoise Trail. See sidebar (p. 18) for more snowshoeing opportunities. (505) 242-9052; sandiapeak.com SIPAPU SKI RESORT Uncrowded slopes, family-friendly atmosphere. OPENS: November 16 (Sipapu’s earliest opening ever, and the 11th straight year the resort has been the first ski area to open in New Mexico). STATS: Average Snowfall – 190”; Base Elevation – 8,200’; Peak Elevation – 9,255’; Vertical Drop – 1,055’ WHAT’S NEW: Fourth- and fifth-graders ski free every day (report card required). Kids six and younger, active-duty military, and adults ski free, as do those aged 40, 60, 70, and older (special promotion). DON’T MISS: Forget about sand castles. February Fun Fest , a free event held President’s Day weekend (February 15–17), boasts a multistory snow castle that’s full of slides, steps, and tunnels. “No one else in New Mexico builds anything like this,” says marketing director Stacey Glaser. “It takes our mountain crews a full week to create it!” In addition to the castle, the weekend includes scavenger hunts, a costume parade, face painting, and games. (800) 587-2240; sipapunm.com SKI APACHE The southernmost ski resort in the country—and it has a new gondola. OPENS: November 28 STATS: Average snowfall – 149”; Base Elevation – 9,600’; Peak Elevation – 11,500’; Vertical Drop – 1,900’ WHAT’S NEW: Ski Apache’s 51-year-old passenger gondola was retired in January and replaced with the Apache Arrow, a new, high-speed, Doppelmayr gondola. The vessel carries eight passengers to 11,500 feet twice as fast as the old lift. In addition, four swift new ski lifts will whisk 3,600 more skiers to trail heads hourly. DON’T MISS: Gather together a team of five for the Ski Apache Cup and Vertical Challenge (mid-January). See how many vertical feet you can total in four hours. Unwind afterward at the Inn of the Mountain Gods. (575) 464-3600; skiapache.com SKI CLOUDCROFT Celebrating 50 years of southern skiing in the Sacramento Mountains. OPENS: December STATS: Average Snowfall – 57”; Base Elevation – 8,350’; Peak Elevation – 9,050’; Vertical Drop – 700’ WHAT’S NEW: Ski Cloudcroft has been operating since 1963. This year the resort celebrates 50 years with great skiing (weather permitting; no snow-making) and new activities (check Facebook for updates). The Silver Spoon Ski School and Mustard’s Last Stand restaurant are as good as ever. DON’T MISS: Cloudcroft might be small (fewer than 800 residents), but holidays are a big deal here. Bring an ornament to decorate the tree at the Lighted Christmas Parade & Tree Lighting (December 7), or chow down on Cajun cuisine during Mardi Gras in the Clouds (February 28–March 2). (575) 682-2333; skicloudcroft.net SKI SANTA FE A sunny slope only 20 minutes from the capital city. OPENS: November 28 STATS: Average Snowfall – 189”; Base Elevation – 10,350’; Peak Elevation – 12,075’; Vertical Drop – 1,725’ WHAT’S NEW: The recently renovated La Casa Lodge features a new rental facility that offers more than 1,000 sets of Head skis and Burton snowboard equipment, plus boots, poles, helmets, and more. The lodge’s spiffy new food court features a bakery and a pasta bar. DON’T MISS: Rando skiing, which combines aspects of alpine, telemark, and backcountry skiing with mountaineering, is all the rage among winter-sports buffs, and Ski Santa Fe is offering the state’s first competition. The Santa Fe Fireball Rando Race (February 8) is approximately 4,200 feet and includes multiple ascents on climbing skins and at least one bootpack. (505) 982-4429; skisantafe.com TAOS SKI VALLEY Big-mountain skiing. OPENS: November 28 STATS: Average Snowfall – 236”; Base Elevation – 9,207’; Peak Elevation – 12,481’; Vertical Drop – 2,612’ WHAT’S NEW: The upcoming December issue will include a report on exciting new developments in the works at TSV. DON’T MISS: With both a ski event and a benefit auction, Breast Cancer Awareness Day takes place February 22. During the K2 Bumps Challenge , teams of two ski Al’s Run as many times as possible in four hours. That evening, bidders can take home snowboards that have been painted by local artists during the Paint for Peaks Art Auction. The Salomon Extreme Freeride Championships (February 27–March 1) showcase some of the best double-diamond terrain in the country. Over 150 athletes compete for more than $15,000 in prizes. (575) 776-2291; skitaos.org Snow reports provided by OnTheSnow. The snow report widget is most likely not displaying because you have JavaScript disabled. To see the Ski Report for every ski area in the world visit OnTheSnow or click on these popular regions: Red River Taos Ski Valley Angel Fire Resort Ski Santa Fe","publish_start_moment":"2013-11-06T12:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:59:05.698Z"},{"_id":"58b4b27f4c2774661570f8d7","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"What's Happening","slug":"whatshappeningjuly2013-81366","image_id":"58b4b2454c2774661570f3ea","publish_start":"2013-06-17T10:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f335"],"tags_ids":["59090e53e1efff4c9916fb3e"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_tagline":"July Events Highlight New Mexico's Summer","created":"2013-06-17T10:10:37.000Z","legacy_id":"81366","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"what's happening","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:30.094Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

JULY 4

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FLAPJACKS ON THE FOURTH

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At Santa Fe’s Pancakes on the Plaza, thousands stand in line for hotcakes whipped up, ladled out, and flipped by teams of volunteers from local organizations, such as the Rotary Club of Santa Fe, which hosts the event. Although ostensibly about the pancakes, served from early morning through the noon hour, the event is really about catching up with friends and meeting new ones, feeling a part of the community, and knowing that the money raised supports many nonprofits throughout the year. Dance to live music at the Plaza bandstand, check out a cool car show, and purchase gifts from local artisans. 7 a.m.–noon. $6. (505) 274-2266; pancakesontheplaza.com

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Many cities and towns throughout New Mexico host Fourth of July celebrations. From the Fire on the Fourth motorcycle show in Angel Fire to a rubber duckie race at Taos Ski Valley and fireworks over Elephant Butte Lake(July 6), patriotism and parties abound.

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JULY 5–7

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SPACE JAM

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Don’t wait for Halloween to break out that alien costume. Head to Roswell for the annual UFO Festival, a three-day celebration of all things extraterrestrial, including the 66th anniversary of the famous alleged UFO sighting in 1947. “This year we are again offering plenty of stage and street entertainment, and Nezbit the Alien will visit again,” says organizer Juliana Halvorson. Guest speakers, authors, a parade, and a costume contest (for you and your pets) with cash prizes will ensure that your weekend is out of this world. Free. (575) 624-7704; ufofestivalroswell.com

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JULY 6–7

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TRIAL BY VINE

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Raise a glass (the one included in your entry fee) at the Santa Fe Wine Festival at Rancho de las Golondrinas. Sixteen New Mexico wineries will offer samples—a great way to zero in on faves without a lot of full-bottle trial and error. “New Mexico was the first wine-making state, so we’ve had hundreds of years to get it right,” says organizer Amanda Crocker. “There are wines for every taste coming out of New Mexico: dry, sweet, sparkling, fruity, and even chocolaty.” Noon–6 p.m. $13. (505) 471-2261; santafewinefestival.com

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JULY 12–14

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A FEST FOR THE SENSES

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“Our location is what sets us apart from other powwows,” says Debbie Lujan, an organizer of the 28th annual Taos Pueblo Pow Wow. “Where else can you find a wooden arbor in grassy meadows situated beneath the majestic Taos Mountain? If you’re lucky enough, you might catch a glimpse of the roaming buffalo on the adjacent pasture lands.” The tribal gathering is known for “the colorful pageantry of the Native American dancers, and the intensity of the singers and their drums,” according to Lujan. “Many local artists of the region are represented, and there’s a variety of tasty foods to be sampled.” $10. (575) 741-0181; taospueblopowwow.com

\r\n\r\n

JULY 19

\r\n\r\n

ELY DOES IT

\r\n\r\n

Despite growing up not far from the New Mexico border, the last time Texan Joe Ely played in Ruidoso was in the early ’80s, at a little bar on Main Street. More than three decades later, the Lubbock native returns to southeastern New Mexico, this time to the Spencer Theater, in nearby Alto. No sign so far of fellow Flatlanders Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Butch Hancock, but it’s a sure bet Ely will be drawing on the band’s extensive repertoire as well as his own impressive songbook. 8 p.m. $66–$69. (888) 818-7872; spencertheater.com

\r\n\r\n

JULY 20–21

\r\n\r\n

A-OHKAY

\r\n\r\n

Want a cool warm-up for Santa Fe Indian Market? Escape the heat at the Ohkay Owingeh Arts & Crafts Show and Market (formerly the Eight Northern Pueblo Arts & Crafts Show), now in its 40th year. Held indoors at the Ohkay Conference Center and Hotel Casino, the event offers 15,000 square feet of Native American crafts, foods, music, and dance. “This event is unique, as it showcases so many tribes from around the country in one awesome venue,” says marketing manager Belinda Chavez. “We also showcase as many Native American dance teams as we can.” More than 100 artists will display their goods, which include jewelry, garments, drums, flutes, pottery, and painting. Representatives from the Indian Arts and Crafts Board will be available to assist both buyers and artists. 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. (505) 852-4400; ohkay.com

\r\n\r\n

JULY 20–21

\r\n\r\n

¡VAMANOS!

\r\n\r\n

Celebrate—and welcome—our neighbors to the south at ¡Viva Mexico!, a festive tribute to Mexican culture, cuisine, and arts hosted at Rancho de las Golondrinas by the Mexican Consulate in Albuquerque. New this year is a charreada rodeo, which focuses on trick riding, fancy lassoing; and an escaramuza, an eight-horse, all-female drill team. “The riding is dazzling, the athleticism of the riders and the reliability of the horses are astonishing, and the dress is totally fabulous,” says John Berkenfield, executive director of Las Golondrinas. “They are a wonderful, exciting group.” The Mercado Mexicano includes a food tent featuring authentic cuisine, cooking and weaving demonstrations, mariachi music, ballet folklórico, a Mexican candy shop, and piñatas for the kids. Don’t forget your sombrero. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $8. 505) 471-2261; golondrinas.org

\r\n\r\n

JULY 22–27

\r\n\r\n

MEET ME AT THE FAIR

\r\n\r\n

At the Eddy County Fair in Artesia, “We reach down into the ranch heritage and try to have events that honor ranching, farming, and agriculture,” explains Debbie Bell, who’s been a volunteer organizer for more than a decade. “This year, we’ll have an all-girls ranch rodeo, which goes back to the good ol’ days of ranching, competing in events such as cow milking and sorting cattle on horseback.” Bull-riding and roping events are scheduled, along with a lively livestock sale. Last year, 126 animals were sold in less than four hours, for more than a half million dollars. Even if you don’t go home with a pony, the auction is worth watching. Free. (575) 746-2744; artesiachamber.com

\r\n\r\n

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 8

\r\n\r\n

CAN YOU DIG IT?

\r\n\r\n

In the late ’60s, one of the most-asked questions in Taos was “Where is the Navajo Gallery?” Celebrities, scenesters, and art buffs streamed into the mountain town to encounter Diné artist R.C. Gorman and his work. If he wasn’t out of town—say, hanging out with Andy Warhol in New York—pilgrims found him bedecked in gold, beads, bandanas, and a Hawaiian shirt, surrounded by his work, in his Taos gallery. This period in Gorman’s career is captured in one of the Harwood’s summer exhibitions, R.C. Gorman: The 1960s. (575) 758-9826; harwoodmuseum.org

\r\n\r\n

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 15

\r\n\r\n

AFRICAN-AMERICAN NEW MEXICO

\r\n\r\n

Now in its fourth month at the Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, New Mexico’s African American Legacy: Visible, Vital, Valuable showcases local African-American society and culture. “This gives insight into a part of New Mexico’s history that hasn’t been told very often before,” says spokesman Craig Massey. The exhibit examines the western migrations of African-Americans to New Mexico, segregation, integration, social organizations, and churches. $5, $3 seniors, $2 children. (575) 522-4100; nmfarmandranchmuseum.org

","teaser_raw":"

JULY 4

FLAPJACKS ON THE FOURTH

At Santa Fe’s Pancakes on the Plaza, thousands stand in line for hotcakes whipped up, ladled out, and flipped by teams of volunteers from local organizations, such as

","version_id":"59f8ebb2648901d6cd725b87","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","blog":"magazine","name":"Whitney Dreier","_name_sort":"whitney dreier","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.428Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.436Z","_totalPosts":5,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"Whitney Dreier","slug":"whitney-dreier","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/#comments","totalPosts":5},"categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f335","blog":"magazine","title":"What's Happening","_title_sort":"what's happening","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.641Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.648Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f335","slug":"whats-happening","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/whats-happening/58b4b2404c2774661570f335/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/whats-happening/58b4b2404c2774661570f335/#comments","totalPosts":16}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2454c2774661570f3ea","legacy_id":"81368","title":"Whats Happening _Main","created":"2013-06-17T10:33:38.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:04.572Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"whats happening _main","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/whats_happening_main_11f16be6-4e84-488b-8f8f-8373db9caed8","version":1488237124,"signature":"b1fceb9c701dec1d4b28da68aedf13c6a6765232","width":488,"height":325,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:04.000Z","bytes":79945,"type":"upload","etag":"8a32a4cc1ce775a500a9cbef94153f52","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237124/clients/newmexico/whats_happening_main_11f16be6-4e84-488b-8f8f-8373db9caed8.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237124/clients/newmexico/whats_happening_main_11f16be6-4e84-488b-8f8f-8373db9caed8.jpg","exif":{"ApertureValue":"4970854/1000000","Artist":"Terry Thompson","BitsPerSample":"8, 8, 8, 8","ColorSpace":"1","Compression":"6","CustomRendered":"0","DateTime":"2013:06:10 11:22:34","DateTimeDigitized":"2005:07:09 18:46:43","DateTimeOriginal":"2005:07:09 18:46:43","ExifImageLength":"325","ExifImageWidth":"488","ExifOffset":"332","ExifVersion":"48, 50, 50, 49","ExposureBiasValue":"0/2","ExposureMode":"0","ExposureProgram":"4","ExposureTime":"1/640","Flash":"16","FNumber":"56/10","FocalLength":"35/1","FocalPlaneResolutionUnit":"2","FocalPlaneXResolution":"3504000/885","FocalPlaneYResolution":"2336000/590","ImageLength":"1800","ImageWidth":"2700","ISOSpeedRatings":"400","Make":"Canon","MaxApertureValue":"496875/100000","MeteringMode":"5","Model":"Canon EOS 20D","Orientation":"1","PhotometricInterpretation":"5","PlanarConfiguration":"1","ResolutionUnit":"2","SamplesPerPixel":"4","SceneCaptureType":"0","ShutterSpeedValue":"9321928/1000000","Software":"Adobe Photoshop CS5.1 Macintosh","JPEGInterchangeFormat":"834","JPEGInterchangeFormatLength":"6095","XResolution":"720000/10000","YResolution":"720000/10000","WhiteBalance":"0"},"original_filename":"whats_happening_main"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2454c2774661570f3ea","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/whats_happening_main_11f16be6-4e84-488b-8f8f-8373db9caed8"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Whats Happening _Main"},"teaser":"

JULY 4

FLAPJACKS ON THE FOURTH

At Santa Fe’s Pancakes on the Plaza, thousands stand in line for hotcakes whipped up, ladled out, and flipped by teams of volunteers from local organizations, such as

","description":"JULY 4 FLAPJACKS ON THE FOURTH At Santa Fe’s Pancakes on the Plaza , thousands stand in line for hotcakes whipped up, ladled out, and flipped by teams of volunteers from local organizations, such as the Rotary Club of Santa Fe, which hosts the event. Although ostensibly about the pancakes, served from early morning through the noon hour, the event is really about catching up with friends and meeting new ones, feeling a part of the community, and knowing that the money raised supports many nonprofits throughout the year. Dance to live music at the Plaza bandstand, check out a cool car show, and purchase gifts from local artisans. 7 a.m.–noon. $6. (505) 274-2266; pancakesontheplaza.com Many cities and towns throughout New Mexico host Fourth of July celebrations. From the Fire on the Fourth motorcycle show in Angel Fire to a rubber duckie race at Taos Ski Valley and fireworks over Elephant Butte Lake(July 6), patriotism and parties abound. JULY 5–7 SPACE JAM Don’t wait for Halloween to break out that alien costume. Head to Roswell for the annual UFO Festival , a three-day celebration of all things extraterrestrial, including the 66th anniversary of the famous alleged UFO sighting in 1947. “This year we are again offering plenty of stage and street entertainment, and Nezbit the Alien will visit again,” says organizer Juliana Halvorson. Guest speakers, authors, a parade, and a costume contest (for you and your pets) with cash prizes will ensure that your weekend is out of this world. Free. (575) 624-7704; ufofestivalroswell.com JULY 6–7 TRIAL BY VINE Raise a glass (the one included in your entry fee) at the Santa Fe Wine Festival at Rancho de las Golondrinas . Sixteen New Mexico wineries will offer samples—a great way to zero in on faves without a lot of full-bottle trial and error. “New Mexico was the first wine-making state, so we’ve had hundreds of years to get it right,” says organizer Amanda Crocker. “There are wines for every taste coming out of New Mexico: dry, sweet, sparkling, fruity, and even chocolaty.” Noon–6 p.m. $13. (505) 471-2261; santafewinefestival.com JULY 12–14 A FEST FOR THE SENSES “Our location is what sets us apart from other powwows,” says Debbie Lujan, an organizer of the 28th annual Taos Pueblo Pow Wow. “Where else can you find a wooden arbor in grassy meadows situated beneath the majestic Taos Mountain? If you’re lucky enough, you might catch a glimpse of the roaming buffalo on the adjacent pasture lands.” The tribal gathering is known for “the colorful pageantry of the Native American dancers, and the intensity of the singers and their drums,” according to Lujan. “Many local artists of the region are represented, and there’s a variety of tasty foods to be sampled.” $10. (575) 741-0181; taospueblopowwow.com JULY 19 ELY DOES IT Despite growing up not far from the New Mexico border, the last time Texan Joe Ely played in Ruidoso was in the early ’80s, at a little bar on Main Street. More than three decades later, the Lubbock native returns to southeastern New Mexico, this time to the Spencer Theater, in nearby Alto. No sign so far of fellow Flatlanders Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Butch Hancock, but it’s a sure bet Ely will be drawing on the band’s extensive repertoire as well as his own impressive songbook. 8 p.m. $66–$69. (888) 818-7872; spencertheater.com JULY 20–21 A-OHKAY Want a cool warm-up for Santa Fe Indian Market? Escape the heat at the Ohkay Owingeh Arts & Crafts Show and Market (formerly the Eight Northern Pueblo Arts & Crafts Show), now in its 40th year. Held indoors at the Ohkay Conference Center and Hotel Casino, the event offers 15,000 square feet of Native American crafts, foods, music, and dance. “This event is unique, as it showcases so many tribes from around the country in one awesome venue,” says marketing manager Belinda Chavez. “We also showcase as many Native American dance teams as we can.” More than 100 artists will display their goods, which include jewelry, garments, drums, flutes, pottery, and painting. Representatives from the Indian Arts and Crafts Board will be available to assist both buyers and artists. 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. (505) 852-4400; ohkay.com JULY 20–21 ¡VAMANOS! Celebrate—and welcome—our neighbors to the south at ¡Viva Mexico! , a festive tribute to Mexican culture, cuisine, and arts hosted at Rancho de las Golondrinas by the Mexican Consulate in Albuquerque. New this year is a charreada rodeo, which focuses on trick riding, fancy lassoing; and an escaramuza , an eight-horse, all-female drill team. “The riding is dazzling, the athleticism of the riders and the reliability of the horses are astonishing, and the dress is totally fabulous,” says John Berkenfield, executive director of Las Golondrinas. “They are a wonderful, exciting group.” The Mercado Mexicano includes a food tent featuring authentic cuisine, cooking and weaving demonstrations, mariachi music, ballet folklórico, a Mexican candy shop, and piñatas for the kids. Don’t forget your sombrero. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $8. 505) 471-2261; golondrinas.org JULY 22–27 MEET ME AT THE FAIR At the Eddy County Fair in Artesia, “We reach down into the ranch heritage and try to have events that honor ranching, farming, and agriculture,” explains Debbie Bell, who’s been a volunteer organizer for more than a decade. “This year, we’ll have an all-girls ranch rodeo, which goes back to the good ol’ days of ranching, competing in events such as cow milking and sorting cattle on horseback.” Bull-riding and roping events are scheduled, along with a lively livestock sale. Last year, 126 animals were sold in less than four hours, for more than a half million dollars. Even if you don’t go home with a pony, the auction is worth watching. Free. (575) 746-2744; artesiachamber.com THROUGH SEPTEMBER 8 CAN YOU DIG IT? In the late ’60s, one of the most-asked questions in Taos was “Where is the Navajo Gallery?” Celebrities, scenesters, and art buffs streamed into the mountain town to encounter Diné artist R.C. Gorman and his work. If he wasn’t out of town—say, hanging out with Andy Warhol in New York—pilgrims found him bedecked in gold, beads, bandanas, and a Hawaiian shirt, surrounded by his work, in his Taos gallery. This period in Gorman’s career is captured in one of the Harwood’s summer exhibitions, R.C. Gorman: The 1960s. (575) 758-9826; harwoodmuseum.org THROUGH SEPTEMBER 15 AFRICAN-AMERICAN NEW MEXICO Now in its fourth month at the Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, New Mexico’s African American Legacy: Visible, Vital, Valuable showcases local African-American society and culture. “This gives insight into a part of New Mexico’s history that hasn’t been told very often before,” says spokesman Craig Massey. The exhibit examines the western migrations of African-Americans to New Mexico, segregation, integration, social organizations, and churches. $5, $3 seniors, $2 children. (575) 522-4100; nmfarmandranchmuseum.org","id":"58b4b27f4c2774661570f8d7","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/whatshappeningjuly2013-81366/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/whatshappeningjuly2013-81366/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/whatshappeningjuly2013-81366/","metaTitle":"What's Happening","metaDescription":"

JULY 4

FLAPJACKS ON THE FOURTH

At Santa Fe’s Pancakes on the Plaza, thousands stand in line for hotcakes whipped up, ladled out, and flipped by teams of volunteers from local organizations, such as

","cleanDescription":"JULY 4 FLAPJACKS ON THE FOURTH At Santa Fe’s Pancakes on the Plaza , thousands stand in line for hotcakes whipped up, ladled out, and flipped by teams of volunteers from local organizations, such as the Rotary Club of Santa Fe, which hosts the event. Although ostensibly about the pancakes, served from early morning through the noon hour, the event is really about catching up with friends and meeting new ones, feeling a part of the community, and knowing that the money raised supports many nonprofits throughout the year. Dance to live music at the Plaza bandstand, check out a cool car show, and purchase gifts from local artisans. 7 a.m.–noon. $6. (505) 274-2266; pancakesontheplaza.com Many cities and towns throughout New Mexico host Fourth of July celebrations. From the Fire on the Fourth motorcycle show in Angel Fire to a rubber duckie race at Taos Ski Valley and fireworks over Elephant Butte Lake(July 6), patriotism and parties abound. JULY 5–7 SPACE JAM Don’t wait for Halloween to break out that alien costume. Head to Roswell for the annual UFO Festival , a three-day celebration of all things extraterrestrial, including the 66th anniversary of the famous alleged UFO sighting in 1947. “This year we are again offering plenty of stage and street entertainment, and Nezbit the Alien will visit again,” says organizer Juliana Halvorson. Guest speakers, authors, a parade, and a costume contest (for you and your pets) with cash prizes will ensure that your weekend is out of this world. Free. (575) 624-7704; ufofestivalroswell.com JULY 6–7 TRIAL BY VINE Raise a glass (the one included in your entry fee) at the Santa Fe Wine Festival at Rancho de las Golondrinas . Sixteen New Mexico wineries will offer samples—a great way to zero in on faves without a lot of full-bottle trial and error. “New Mexico was the first wine-making state, so we’ve had hundreds of years to get it right,” says organizer Amanda Crocker. “There are wines for every taste coming out of New Mexico: dry, sweet, sparkling, fruity, and even chocolaty.” Noon–6 p.m. $13. (505) 471-2261; santafewinefestival.com JULY 12–14 A FEST FOR THE SENSES “Our location is what sets us apart from other powwows,” says Debbie Lujan, an organizer of the 28th annual Taos Pueblo Pow Wow. “Where else can you find a wooden arbor in grassy meadows situated beneath the majestic Taos Mountain? If you’re lucky enough, you might catch a glimpse of the roaming buffalo on the adjacent pasture lands.” The tribal gathering is known for “the colorful pageantry of the Native American dancers, and the intensity of the singers and their drums,” according to Lujan. “Many local artists of the region are represented, and there’s a variety of tasty foods to be sampled.” $10. (575) 741-0181; taospueblopowwow.com JULY 19 ELY DOES IT Despite growing up not far from the New Mexico border, the last time Texan Joe Ely played in Ruidoso was in the early ’80s, at a little bar on Main Street. More than three decades later, the Lubbock native returns to southeastern New Mexico, this time to the Spencer Theater, in nearby Alto. No sign so far of fellow Flatlanders Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Butch Hancock, but it’s a sure bet Ely will be drawing on the band’s extensive repertoire as well as his own impressive songbook. 8 p.m. $66–$69. (888) 818-7872; spencertheater.com JULY 20–21 A-OHKAY Want a cool warm-up for Santa Fe Indian Market? Escape the heat at the Ohkay Owingeh Arts & Crafts Show and Market (formerly the Eight Northern Pueblo Arts & Crafts Show), now in its 40th year. Held indoors at the Ohkay Conference Center and Hotel Casino, the event offers 15,000 square feet of Native American crafts, foods, music, and dance. “This event is unique, as it showcases so many tribes from around the country in one awesome venue,” says marketing manager Belinda Chavez. “We also showcase as many Native American dance teams as we can.” More than 100 artists will display their goods, which include jewelry, garments, drums, flutes, pottery, and painting. Representatives from the Indian Arts and Crafts Board will be available to assist both buyers and artists. 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. (505) 852-4400; ohkay.com JULY 20–21 ¡VAMANOS! Celebrate—and welcome—our neighbors to the south at ¡Viva Mexico! , a festive tribute to Mexican culture, cuisine, and arts hosted at Rancho de las Golondrinas by the Mexican Consulate in Albuquerque. New this year is a charreada rodeo, which focuses on trick riding, fancy lassoing; and an escaramuza , an eight-horse, all-female drill team. “The riding is dazzling, the athleticism of the riders and the reliability of the horses are astonishing, and the dress is totally fabulous,” says John Berkenfield, executive director of Las Golondrinas. “They are a wonderful, exciting group.” The Mercado Mexicano includes a food tent featuring authentic cuisine, cooking and weaving demonstrations, mariachi music, ballet folklórico, a Mexican candy shop, and piñatas for the kids. Don’t forget your sombrero. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $8. 505) 471-2261; golondrinas.org JULY 22–27 MEET ME AT THE FAIR At the Eddy County Fair in Artesia, “We reach down into the ranch heritage and try to have events that honor ranching, farming, and agriculture,” explains Debbie Bell, who’s been a volunteer organizer for more than a decade. “This year, we’ll have an all-girls ranch rodeo, which goes back to the good ol’ days of ranching, competing in events such as cow milking and sorting cattle on horseback.” Bull-riding and roping events are scheduled, along with a lively livestock sale. Last year, 126 animals were sold in less than four hours, for more than a half million dollars. Even if you don’t go home with a pony, the auction is worth watching. Free. (575) 746-2744; artesiachamber.com THROUGH SEPTEMBER 8 CAN YOU DIG IT? In the late ’60s, one of the most-asked questions in Taos was “Where is the Navajo Gallery?” Celebrities, scenesters, and art buffs streamed into the mountain town to encounter Diné artist R.C. Gorman and his work. If he wasn’t out of town—say, hanging out with Andy Warhol in New York—pilgrims found him bedecked in gold, beads, bandanas, and a Hawaiian shirt, surrounded by his work, in his Taos gallery. This period in Gorman’s career is captured in one of the Harwood’s summer exhibitions, R.C. Gorman: The 1960s. (575) 758-9826; harwoodmuseum.org THROUGH SEPTEMBER 15 AFRICAN-AMERICAN NEW MEXICO Now in its fourth month at the Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, New Mexico’s African American Legacy: Visible, Vital, Valuable showcases local African-American society and culture. “This gives insight into a part of New Mexico’s history that hasn’t been told very often before,” says spokesman Craig Massey. The exhibit examines the western migrations of African-Americans to New Mexico, segregation, integration, social organizations, and churches. $5, $3 seniors, $2 children. (575) 522-4100; nmfarmandranchmuseum.org","publish_start_moment":"2013-06-17T10:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:59:05.700Z"},{"_id":"58b4b27f4c2774661570f8c1","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"A Capable Contractor Needs a Solid Foundation","slug":"builderinterview-80218","image_id":"58b4b2454c2774661570f3f7","publish_start":"2013-03-15T15:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f2a3"],"tags_ids":["59090cb1e1efff4c9916fa25"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"created":"2013-03-15T15:16:00.000Z","legacy_id":"80218","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"a capable contractor needs a solid foundation","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:29.830Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

Note:  Photo is the Long-Murata Home - Wheeler Construction and Design.com

\r\n\r\n

 

\r\n\r\n

As writer Charles C. Poling explained in “All the Right Intel: Turning Your Dream Home into Your Dream Home” (April 2013, Page 55), building a house is complicated. In addition to being financial stable yourself, you must make sure your builder has the funds and resources to complete his or her end of the deal.

\r\n\r\n

William Prull, president of Santa Fe-based Prull Custom Builders, offers seven tips for checking up on your builder’s financial situation:

\r\n\r\n

•Ask the builder for banking references. Although bankers cannot disclose financial records, they can tell you whether a builder has good business and loan payment history.

\r\n\r\n

•Ask the builder for trade and vendor references, which should give you a feel for how a contractor is evaluated by his or her peers. Check with these suppliers to confirm that the builder’s payment history is solid and that he or she is current on open accounts. Balances older than 30 or 60 days should raise a red flag.

\r\n\r\n

•Ask the builder questions to get a snap shot of his or her financial history: Are you current on your accounts payables? Do you have current workers compensation and general liability insurance policies? (Lapsed policies are a warning sign regardless, but they are also a sign of financial weakness.) Are you busy, and have you been busy? Have you had to lay off people? Have you been forced to close an office and move back to a home office?

\r\n\r\n

•Ask to review copies of proposed contracts in advance. Check to make certain the builder will supply lien waivers every month to ensure that funds are being properly dispersed to the sub-contractors and vendors on the job. Also, small deposits may be OK, but large up-front deposit requests in a contract might be suspect. If the builder provides for retainage from each month’s billing, this withheld amount can be paid upon satisfactory completion of the contract.

\r\n\r\n

•For more official insight, check with the Better Business Bureau, which will have records of complaints by clients, such as billing/collection issues, problems with service or delivery issues. This service, which also rates businesses on a scale of A+ to F, is free and available online.

\r\n\r\n

Dun & Bradstreet, a leading source of commercial information and insight on businesses, can provide a report about your potential builder. These online reports start at $62, for which price you will get you payment history, industry payment benchmarks and credit limit recommendations. The more expensive reports offer information such as the likelihood of business failure or late payments.

\r\n\r\n

•Check with Construction Industry Division, part of the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department, to see if complaints or judgments were made against the builder. You’ll need the contractor’s name and license number.

\r\n\r\n

Happy building!

","teaser_raw":"

Note: Photo is the Long-Murata Home - Wheeler Construction and Design.com

As writer Charles C. Poling explained in “All the Right Intel: Turning Your Dream Home into Your Dream Home” (April 2013,

","version_id":"59f8ebb1648901d6cd725ae2","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","blog":"magazine","name":"Whitney Dreier","_name_sort":"whitney dreier","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.428Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.436Z","_totalPosts":5,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"Whitney Dreier","slug":"whitney-dreier","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/#comments","totalPosts":5},"categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2a3","blog":"magazine","title":"Features","_title_sort":"features","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.492Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.504Z","_totalPosts":208,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2a3","slug":"features","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/features/58b4b2404c2774661570f2a3/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/features/58b4b2404c2774661570f2a3/#comments","totalPosts":208}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2454c2774661570f3f7","legacy_id":"80278","title":"Home Builder Main","created":"2013-03-22T14:29:19.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:04.407Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"home builder main","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/homebuildermain_50167314-5208-476d-b1ea-6c6ea3a95559","version":1488237125,"signature":"f38722cc6b57d80097895849b080c50ae0d25765","width":488,"height":320,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:05.000Z","bytes":43781,"type":"upload","etag":"a4e01e9b61acfd468036a5d0ae994dc9","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237125/clients/newmexico/homebuildermain_50167314-5208-476d-b1ea-6c6ea3a95559.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237125/clients/newmexico/homebuildermain_50167314-5208-476d-b1ea-6c6ea3a95559.jpg","exif":{"ApertureValue":"761471/100000","BitsPerSample":"8, 8, 8","ColorSpace":"65535","CustomRendered":"0","DateTime":"2013:03:22 13:28:59","DateTimeDigitized":"2013:01:20 11:55:41","DateTimeOriginal":"2013:01:20 11:55:41","ExifImageLength":"320","ExifImageWidth":"488","ExifOffset":"276","ExifVersion":"48, 50, 51, 48","ExposureBiasValue":"0/1","ExposureMode":"0","ExposureProgram":"2","ExposureTime":"1/400","Flash":"16","FNumber":"14/1","FocalLength":"24/1","FocalPlaneResolutionUnit":"2","FocalPlaneXResolution":"5184000/905","FocalPlaneYResolution":"3456000/595","ImageLength":"3300","ImageWidth":"5034","ISOSpeedRatings":"640","Make":"Canon","MaxApertureValue":"3875/1000","MeteringMode":"2","Model":"Canon EOS 60D","Orientation":"1","PhotometricInterpretation":"2","ResolutionUnit":"2","SamplesPerPixel":"3","SceneCaptureType":"0","ShutterSpeedValue":"8643856/1000000","Software":"Adobe Photoshop CS5 Macintosh","SubjectDistance":"266/100","SubSecTime":"67","SubSecTimeDigitized":"67","SubSecTimeOriginal":"67","Compression":"6","JPEGInterchangeFormat":"986","JPEGInterchangeFormatLength":"4516","XResolution":"720000/10000","YResolution":"720000/10000","WhiteBalance":"0"},"original_filename":"homebuildermain"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2454c2774661570f3f7","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/homebuildermain_50167314-5208-476d-b1ea-6c6ea3a95559"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Home Builder Main"},"teaser":"

Note: Photo is the Long-Murata Home - Wheeler Construction and Design.com

As writer Charles C. Poling explained in “All the Right Intel: Turning Your Dream Home into Your Dream Home” (April 2013,

","description":"Note:  Photo is the Long-Murata Home - Wheeler Construction and Design.com   As writer Charles C. Poling explained in “All the Right Intel: Turning Your Dream Home into Your Dream Home” (April 2013, Page 55), building a house is complicated. In addition to being financial stable yourself, you must make sure your builder has the funds and resources to complete his or her end of the deal. William Prull, president of Santa Fe-based Prull Custom Builders , offers seven tips for checking up on your builder’s financial situation: •Ask the builder for banking references. Although bankers cannot disclose financial records, they can tell you whether a builder has good business and loan payment history. •Ask the builder for trade and vendor references, which should give you a feel for how a contractor is evaluated by his or her peers. Check with these suppliers to confirm that the builder’s payment history is solid and that he or she is current on open accounts. Balances older than 30 or 60 days should raise a red flag. •Ask the builder questions to get a snap shot of his or her financial history: Are you current on your accounts payables? Do you have current workers compensation and general liability insurance policies? (Lapsed policies are a warning sign regardless, but they are also a sign of financial weakness.) Are you busy, and have you been busy? Have you had to lay off people? Have you been forced to close an office and move back to a home office? •Ask to review copies of proposed contracts in advance. Check to make certain the builder will supply lien waivers every month to ensure that funds are being properly dispersed to the sub-contractors and vendors on the job. Also, small deposits may be OK, but large up-front deposit requests in a contract might be suspect. If the builder provides for retainage from each month’s billing, this withheld amount can be paid upon satisfactory completion of the contract. •For more official insight, check with the Better Business Bureau , which will have records of complaints by clients, such as billing/collection issues, problems with service or delivery issues. This service, which also rates businesses on a scale of A+ to F, is free and available online. • Dun & Bradstreet , a leading source of commercial information and insight on businesses, can provide a report about your potential builder. These online reports start at $62, for which price you will get you payment history, industry payment benchmarks and credit limit recommendations. The more expensive reports offer information such as the likelihood of business failure or late payments. •Check with Construction Industry Division , part of the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department, to see if complaints or judgments were made against the builder. You’ll need the contractor’s name and license number. Happy building!","id":"58b4b27f4c2774661570f8c1","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/builderinterview-80218/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/builderinterview-80218/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/builderinterview-80218/","metaTitle":"A Capable Contractor Needs a Solid Foundation","metaDescription":"

Note: Photo is the Long-Murata Home - Wheeler Construction and Design.com

As writer Charles C. Poling explained in “All the Right Intel: Turning Your Dream Home into Your Dream Home” (April 2013,

","cleanDescription":"Note:  Photo is the Long-Murata Home - Wheeler Construction and Design.com   As writer Charles C. Poling explained in “All the Right Intel: Turning Your Dream Home into Your Dream Home” (April 2013, Page 55), building a house is complicated. In addition to being financial stable yourself, you must make sure your builder has the funds and resources to complete his or her end of the deal. William Prull, president of Santa Fe-based Prull Custom Builders , offers seven tips for checking up on your builder’s financial situation: •Ask the builder for banking references. Although bankers cannot disclose financial records, they can tell you whether a builder has good business and loan payment history. •Ask the builder for trade and vendor references, which should give you a feel for how a contractor is evaluated by his or her peers. Check with these suppliers to confirm that the builder’s payment history is solid and that he or she is current on open accounts. Balances older than 30 or 60 days should raise a red flag. •Ask the builder questions to get a snap shot of his or her financial history: Are you current on your accounts payables? Do you have current workers compensation and general liability insurance policies? (Lapsed policies are a warning sign regardless, but they are also a sign of financial weakness.) Are you busy, and have you been busy? Have you had to lay off people? Have you been forced to close an office and move back to a home office? •Ask to review copies of proposed contracts in advance. Check to make certain the builder will supply lien waivers every month to ensure that funds are being properly dispersed to the sub-contractors and vendors on the job. Also, small deposits may be OK, but large up-front deposit requests in a contract might be suspect. If the builder provides for retainage from each month’s billing, this withheld amount can be paid upon satisfactory completion of the contract. •For more official insight, check with the Better Business Bureau , which will have records of complaints by clients, such as billing/collection issues, problems with service or delivery issues. This service, which also rates businesses on a scale of A+ to F, is free and available online. • Dun & Bradstreet , a leading source of commercial information and insight on businesses, can provide a report about your potential builder. These online reports start at $62, for which price you will get you payment history, industry payment benchmarks and credit limit recommendations. The more expensive reports offer information such as the likelihood of business failure or late payments. •Check with Construction Industry Division , part of the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department, to see if complaints or judgments were made against the builder. You’ll need the contractor’s name and license number. Happy building!","publish_start_moment":"2013-03-15T15:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:59:05.700Z"},{"_id":"58b4b27f4c2774661570f86e","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"Putting the Aaah in Spa","slug":"spas-77325","image_id":"58b4b2434c2774661570f34b","publish_start":"2012-09-13T15:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f2ea","58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52","59091533e1efff4c99170336"],"tags_ids":["59090d4fe1efff4c9916fa93","59090d4be1efff4c9916fa90","5909153ce1efff4c9917033a"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"Julien McRoberts","custom_tagline":"Slough off the winter blues with one of these rejuvenating spa treatments.","created":"2012-09-13T15:50:05.000Z","legacy_id":"77325","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"putting the aaah in spa","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:28.851Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

Betty’s Bath & Day Spa, Albuquerque
\r\nDulce de Cuerpo
\r\nFounded in 2000, Betty’s has become the local go-to spa for communal and private tub soaks, facials, massages, and other treatments. Betty’s boutique offers organic, natural body-care product lines that are used on site. The popular Dulce de Cuerpo treatment includes scalp, hand, and foot massages, followed by a lightly exfoliating sugar scrub with a choice of lemon verbena or coconut lemongrass scents. “This is one of my favorite treatments because the sugar scrub feels silky and soft to the skin and leaves your body glowing,” says operations manager Jennifer McDermott. $70 for 45 minutes; (505) 341-3456.

\r\n\r\n

Duncan Noble Rejuvenating Day Spa, Las Cruces
\r\nThe René
\r\nFor two decades, this arboreal oasis, which specializes in hair, skin, and massage, has thrived in the heart of Las Cruces. About two years ago, owner Carol Duncan designed the René for a specific client, and the facial has since become one of the spa’s most popular menu items. It treats all three layers of skin—“an action that causes reaction,” says Duncan, who performs at least two a day. “People look four or five years younger—they put off getting face lifts!” $200 for 90 minutes; (575) 526-9219.

\r\n\r\n


\r\nEl Monte Sagrado Living Resort and Spa, Taos
\r\nHigh Desert Wrap
\r\nTaos is a city of culture, art, and beauty, all of which El Monte Sagrado Living Resort and Spa embraces. Inside this adobe castle, which includes an eco-friendly inn and full-service spa, a soothing wrap, face treatment, and moisturizing massage restore elasticity and vibrancy to dehydrated skin, which many people experience during winter months. “After a spring rain in Taos, the air feels fresh,” explains spa director Mónica Muñoz. “We have been able to capture that same feeling in the High Desert Wrap, allowing the mind, body, and spirit to be taken to a place of calm stillness.” The resort is offering a package exclusively for New Mexico Magazine readers that includes accommodations, a guided hike, two meals, and a couples’ massage at Living Spa. Treatment from $140 for 60 minutes; package from $700 (valid April–May, call for details); (575) 758-3502.

\r\n\r\n

Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort and Spa, Ojo Caliente
\r\nAncient Echoes Massage
\r\nSituated on more than 1,000 acres amid National Forest and public lands, Ojo Caliente is the only hot-spring resort in the world with four different types of sulfer-free mineral water. The full-service spa there offers many Native-inspired treatments, such as the Ancient Echoes Massage, which debuted in November. This procedure for the head, neck, shoulders, and back is designed to calm the mind and alleviate headaches, insomnia, and eyestrain. “This treatment opens the spine and increases cerebral spinal fluid flow to the head,” says spa director Gwynne Ann Unruh. “The slow pace of the Ancient Echoes gives time for the nervous system to relax into the touch it is receiving.” Afterward, check out the spa’s new semiprivate Kiva Pool. $159 for 80 minutes; (505) 583-2233.

\r\n\r\n

Ten Thousand Waves, Santa Fe
\r\nAsian Delight
\r\nTucked into the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Ten Thousand Waves provides guests with a uniquely Japanese spa experience-. Though primarily a day spa, it does offer some overnight accommodations. Opt for the Asian Delight package to experience a 105-degree kazukoburo (private bath), and a Thai massage that will lengthen your muscles and leave you feeling inches taller. Finally, you’ll be treated to a Japanese organic facial that includes neck and shoulder massages, cleansing, exfoliation, extractions, a mask, and moisturizer. Delightful! $269 for 3.5 hours. (505) 982-9304.

","teaser_raw":"

Betty’s Bath & Day Spa, Albuquerque
Dulce de Cuerpo
Founded in 2000, Betty’s has become the local go-to spa for communal and private tub soaks, facials, massages, and other treatments. Betty’s

","version_id":"59f8ebb0648901d6cd725931","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","blog":"magazine","name":"Whitney Dreier","_name_sort":"whitney dreier","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.428Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.436Z","_totalPosts":5,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"Whitney Dreier","slug":"whitney-dreier","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/#comments","totalPosts":5},"categories":[{"_id":"58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52","title":"Lifestyle","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"lifestyle","updated":"2017-03-14T18:51:36.346Z","created":"2017-03-14T18:51:36.346Z","_totalPosts":72,"id":"58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52","slug":"lifestyle","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/lifestyle/58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/lifestyle/58c83bb81f16f9392cf09b52/#comments","totalPosts":72},{"_id":"59091533e1efff4c99170336","title":"March 2012","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"march 2012","updated":"2017-05-02T23:24:35.884Z","created":"2017-05-02T23:24:35.884Z","_totalPosts":4,"id":"59091533e1efff4c99170336","slug":"march-2012","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/march-2012/59091533e1efff4c99170336/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/march-2012/59091533e1efff4c99170336/#comments","totalPosts":4}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2434c2774661570f34b","legacy_id":"77743","title":"Spa","created":"2012-09-17T16:56:07.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:02.118Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"spa","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/spa_b752818f-e6c7-4adf-9bca-1160731b08ea","version":1488237123,"signature":"9b6cbd3a361da235c60f7fc8fa1cebe7a6207a05","width":488,"height":733,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:03.000Z","bytes":121892,"type":"upload","etag":"9bee7a19d85710126f3d40cb073795f9","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237123/clients/newmexico/spa_b752818f-e6c7-4adf-9bca-1160731b08ea.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237123/clients/newmexico/spa_b752818f-e6c7-4adf-9bca-1160731b08ea.jpg","exif":{"ApertureValue":"6918863/1000000","Artist":"Julien McRoberts","BitsPerSample":"8, 8, 8, 8","ColorSpace":"1","Compression":"6","Copyright":"Julien McRoberts Photography 2010","CustomRendered":"0","DateTime":"2012:09:17 15:55:36","DateTimeDigitized":"2011:02:23 11:16:29","DateTimeOriginal":"2011:02:23 11:16:29","ExifImageLength":"733","ExifImageWidth":"488","ExifOffset":"384","ExifVersion":"48, 50, 50, 49","ExposureBiasValue":"0/1","ExposureMode":"1","ExposureProgram":"1","ExposureTime":"1/250","Flash":"16","FNumber":"11/1","FocalLength":"45/1","FocalPlaneResolutionUnit":"2","FocalPlaneXResolution":"5616000/1459","FocalPlaneYResolution":"3744000/958","ImageLength":"3600","ImageWidth":"2400","ISOSpeedRatings":"160","Make":"Canon","MaxApertureValue":"4/1","MeteringMode":"2","Model":"Canon EOS 5D Mark II","Orientation":"1","PhotometricInterpretation":"5","PlanarConfiguration":"1","ResolutionUnit":"2","SamplesPerPixel":"4","SceneCaptureType":"0","ShutterSpeedValue":"7965784/1000000","Software":"Adobe Photoshop CS5.1 Macintosh","SubjectDistance":"4294967295/1","SubSecTimeDigitized":"68","SubSecTimeOriginal":"68","JPEGInterchangeFormat":"1042","JPEGInterchangeFormatLength":"9039","XResolution":"720000/10000","YResolution":"720000/10000","WhiteBalance":"1"},"original_filename":"spa"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2434c2774661570f34b","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/spa_b752818f-e6c7-4adf-9bca-1160731b08ea"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Spa"},"tags":[{"_id":"59090d4fe1efff4c9916fa93","title":"Hotels & Lodging","created":"2017-05-02T22:50:55.158Z","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"hotels & lodging","updated":"2017-05-16T23:12:03.985Z","_totalPosts":17,"id":"59090d4fe1efff4c9916fa93","slug":"hotels-%26-lodging","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/tag/hotels-%26-lodging/59090d4fe1efff4c9916fa93/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/tag/hotels-%26-lodging/59090d4fe1efff4c9916fa93/#comments","totalPosts":17}],"teaser":"

Betty’s Bath & Day Spa, Albuquerque
Dulce de Cuerpo
Founded in 2000, Betty’s has become the local go-to spa for communal and private tub soaks, facials, massages, and other treatments. Betty’s

","description":"Betty’s Bath & Day Spa, Albuquerque Dulce de Cuerpo Founded in 2000, Betty’s has become the local go-to spa for communal and private tub soaks, facials, massages, and other treatments. Betty’s boutique offers organic, natural body-care product lines that are used on site. The popular Dulce de Cuerpo treatment includes scalp, hand, and foot massages, followed by a lightly exfoliating sugar scrub with a choice of lemon verbena or coconut lemongrass scents. “This is one of my favorite treatments because the sugar scrub feels silky and soft to the skin and leaves your body glowing,” says operations manager Jennifer McDermott. $70 for 45 minutes; (505) 341-3456. Duncan Noble Rejuvenating Day Spa, Las Cruces The René For two decades, this arboreal oasis, which specializes in hair, skin, and massage, has thrived in the heart of Las Cruces. About two years ago, owner Carol Duncan designed the René for a specific client, and the facial has since become one of the spa’s most popular menu items. It treats all three layers of skin—“an action that causes reaction,” says Duncan, who performs at least two a day. “People look four or five years younger—they put off getting face lifts!” $200 for 90 minutes; (575) 526-9219. El Monte Sagrado Living Resort and Spa, Taos High Desert Wrap Taos is a city of culture, art, and beauty, all of which El Monte Sagrado Living Resort and Spa embraces. Inside this adobe castle, which includes an eco-friendly inn and full-service spa, a soothing wrap, face treatment, and moisturizing massage restore elasticity and vibrancy to dehydrated skin, which many people experience during winter months. “After a spring rain in Taos, the air feels fresh,” explains spa director Mónica Muñoz. “We have been able to capture that same feeling in the High Desert Wrap, allowing the mind, body, and spirit to be taken to a place of calm stillness.” The resort is offering a package exclusively for New Mexico Magazine readers that includes accommodations, a guided hike, two meals, and a couples’ massage at Living Spa. Treatment from $140 for 60 minutes; package from $700 (valid April–May, call for details); (575) 758-3502. Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort and Spa, Ojo Caliente Ancient Echoes Massage Situated on more than 1,000 acres amid National Forest and public lands, Ojo Caliente is the only hot-spring resort in the world with four different types of sulfer-free mineral water. The full-service spa there offers many Native-inspired treatments, such as the Ancient Echoes Massage, which debuted in November. This procedure for the head, neck, shoulders, and back is designed to calm the mind and alleviate headaches, insomnia, and eyestrain. “This treatment opens the spine and increases cerebral spinal fluid flow to the head,” says spa director Gwynne Ann Unruh. “The slow pace of the Ancient Echoes gives time for the nervous system to relax into the touch it is receiving.” Afterward, check out the spa’s new semiprivate Kiva Pool. $159 for 80 minutes; (505) 583-2233. Ten Thousand Waves, Santa Fe Asian Delight Tucked into the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Ten Thousand Waves provides guests with a uniquely Japanese spa experience-. Though primarily a day spa, it does offer some overnight accommodations. Opt for the Asian Delight package to experience a 105-degree kazukoburo (private bath), and a Thai massage that will lengthen your muscles and leave you feeling inches taller. Finally, you’ll be treated to a Japanese organic facial that includes neck and shoulder massages, cleansing, exfoliation, extractions, a mask, and moisturizer. Delightful! $269 for 3.5 hours. (505) 982-9304.","id":"58b4b27f4c2774661570f86e","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/spas-77325/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/spas-77325/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/spas-77325/","metaTitle":"Putting the Aaah in Spa","metaDescription":"

Betty’s Bath & Day Spa, Albuquerque
Dulce de Cuerpo
Founded in 2000, Betty’s has become the local go-to spa for communal and private tub soaks, facials, massages, and other treatments. Betty’s

","cleanDescription":"Betty’s Bath & Day Spa, Albuquerque Dulce de Cuerpo Founded in 2000, Betty’s has become the local go-to spa for communal and private tub soaks, facials, massages, and other treatments. Betty’s boutique offers organic, natural body-care product lines that are used on site. The popular Dulce de Cuerpo treatment includes scalp, hand, and foot massages, followed by a lightly exfoliating sugar scrub with a choice of lemon verbena or coconut lemongrass scents. “This is one of my favorite treatments because the sugar scrub feels silky and soft to the skin and leaves your body glowing,” says operations manager Jennifer McDermott. $70 for 45 minutes; (505) 341-3456. Duncan Noble Rejuvenating Day Spa, Las Cruces The René For two decades, this arboreal oasis, which specializes in hair, skin, and massage, has thrived in the heart of Las Cruces. About two years ago, owner Carol Duncan designed the René for a specific client, and the facial has since become one of the spa’s most popular menu items. It treats all three layers of skin—“an action that causes reaction,” says Duncan, who performs at least two a day. “People look four or five years younger—they put off getting face lifts!” $200 for 90 minutes; (575) 526-9219. El Monte Sagrado Living Resort and Spa, Taos High Desert Wrap Taos is a city of culture, art, and beauty, all of which El Monte Sagrado Living Resort and Spa embraces. Inside this adobe castle, which includes an eco-friendly inn and full-service spa, a soothing wrap, face treatment, and moisturizing massage restore elasticity and vibrancy to dehydrated skin, which many people experience during winter months. “After a spring rain in Taos, the air feels fresh,” explains spa director Mónica Muñoz. “We have been able to capture that same feeling in the High Desert Wrap, allowing the mind, body, and spirit to be taken to a place of calm stillness.” The resort is offering a package exclusively for New Mexico Magazine readers that includes accommodations, a guided hike, two meals, and a couples’ massage at Living Spa. Treatment from $140 for 60 minutes; package from $700 (valid April–May, call for details); (575) 758-3502. Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort and Spa, Ojo Caliente Ancient Echoes Massage Situated on more than 1,000 acres amid National Forest and public lands, Ojo Caliente is the only hot-spring resort in the world with four different types of sulfer-free mineral water. The full-service spa there offers many Native-inspired treatments, such as the Ancient Echoes Massage, which debuted in November. This procedure for the head, neck, shoulders, and back is designed to calm the mind and alleviate headaches, insomnia, and eyestrain. “This treatment opens the spine and increases cerebral spinal fluid flow to the head,” says spa director Gwynne Ann Unruh. “The slow pace of the Ancient Echoes gives time for the nervous system to relax into the touch it is receiving.” Afterward, check out the spa’s new semiprivate Kiva Pool. $159 for 80 minutes; (505) 583-2233. Ten Thousand Waves, Santa Fe Asian Delight Tucked into the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Ten Thousand Waves provides guests with a uniquely Japanese spa experience-. Though primarily a day spa, it does offer some overnight accommodations. Opt for the Asian Delight package to experience a 105-degree kazukoburo (private bath), and a Thai massage that will lengthen your muscles and leave you feeling inches taller. Finally, you’ll be treated to a Japanese organic facial that includes neck and shoulder massages, cleansing, exfoliation, extractions, a mask, and moisturizer. Delightful! $269 for 3.5 hours. (505) 982-9304.","publish_start_moment":"2012-09-13T15:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:59:05.701Z"},{"_id":"58b4b27f4c2774661570f867","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"Miles of Smiles","slug":"hiking-77294","image_id":"58b4b2434c2774661570f35a","publish_start":"2012-09-13T14:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","590912c6e1efff4c9916fbd3"],"tags_ids":["59090ce8e1efff4c9916fa49","59090e46e1efff4c9916fb37","590912cee1efff4c9916fbd6"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"Laurence Parent","custom_tagline":"Hiking the state's highest peak (Wheeler) may be strenuous, but the views from the top are worth the climb. Miles of Smiles Not too cold, not too hot—late spring is prime time for hiking","created":"2012-09-13T14:58:36.000Z","legacy_id":"77294","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"miles of smiles","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:28.765Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

For a Challenge: Wheeler Peak
\r\nThe state’s highest mountain, in Carson National Forest, reaches 13,161 feet. Start early from the trailhead at Taos Ski Valley, and as you wind your way through alpine tundra vegetation you might encounter marmots, pikas, elk, mule deer, and golden eagles. Although the spring thaw means you likely won’t need snowshoes, it’s wise to be prepared with MicroSpikes or YakTrax.
\r\nLength: 15 miles round trip / Elevation: 9,400 to 13,161 feet / Strenuous
\r\nYou might also like: Santa Fe Baldy, La Luz Trail (Sandía Mountains near Albuquerque)

\r\n\r\n

For a Waterfall: Sitting Bull Falls
\r\nA paved path leads to the foot of this 130-foot waterfall 43 miles west of Carlsbad. Arrive in the morning, when the sun illuminates the swimming pools below the falls, then continue up the trail to the area above the falls, on your way to Sitting Bull Spring. You’ll find many wildflowers and aquatic plants here during the summer. Just beyond the spring, perch on the canyon rim for a spectacular panorama of the Lincoln National Forest.
\r\nLength: 3.8 miles round trip / Elevation: 5,250 to 5,500 feet / Easy
\r\nAlso consider: Trigo Canyon (Manzano Mountains near Belén), Jémez Falls (near Jémez Springs)

\r\n\r\n

For a Bizarre Landscape:
\r\nBisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness
\r\nHoodos, spires, arches, pinnacles, and mushroom rocks are just a few of the otherworldly formations you’ll encounter as you trek across the colorful eroded badlands of the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness, near Farmington. Long ago, the area was
\r\na coastal swamp, filled with trees
\r\nand primitive mammals, reptiles, and dinosaurs. Today the wetland has been preserved as a desert wilderness. Pleasant temperatures make this time of year suitable for exploring this exposed landscape. You won’t find designated trails, but you can follow the well-worn flat areas surrounding the washes.
\r\nLength: 4 miles round trip / Elevation: 5,770 to 5,859 feet / Easy
\r\nAlso consider:  Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument (near Cochiti Lake),
\r\nChavez Canyon (near Chama)

\r\n\r\n

For Caves: Cave Creek
\r\nStart at the Panchuela campground in the Pecos Wilderness. From the trailhead, you’ll hike alongside the Panchuela and Cave creeks. The gentle incline is lined with wildflowers and thick vegetation in summer. The water eventually disappears into a series of caves—and so will you, if you’re not careful. The caves are cold, wet, and slippery; come prepared with a headlamp, warm clothes, and practical shoes.
\r\nLength: 6 miles round trip / Elevation: 8,320 to 9,100 feet / Easy
\r\nAlso consider: North Slaughter Canyon (Carlsbad Caverns Wilderness near Carlsbad)

\r\n\r\n

For Solitude: Mogollon Baldy
\r\nIf you’re in for more than a day hike, this two- to three-day excursion culminates at a remote mountaintop fire lookout in the heart of the remote Gila Wilderness (during the summer, a Forest Service ranger is stationed here). To summit, you’ll follow Trail 182, starting at Sandy Point, along the crest of the Mogollon Range, the highest mountains in southern New Mexico. Just before reaching the peak, you’ll trade the dense forest for stunning views of southern New Mexico and Arizona.
\r\nLength: 24 miles / Elevation: 9,132 to 10,770 feet / Moderate
\r\nAlso consider: Blackwater Hole (Coronado National Forest near Animas), Capitán Peak (Capitán Mountains near Capitán)

","teaser_raw":"

For a Challenge: Wheeler Peak
The state’s highest mountain, in Carson National Forest, reaches 13,161 feet. Start early from the trailhead at Taos Ski Valley, and as you wind your way through alpine

","version_id":"59f8ebb0648901d6cd725922","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","blog":"magazine","name":"Whitney Dreier","_name_sort":"whitney dreier","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.428Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.436Z","_totalPosts":5,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f25e","title":"Whitney Dreier","slug":"whitney-dreier","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/whitney-dreier/58b4b2404c2774661570f25e/#comments","totalPosts":5},"categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","blog":"magazine","title":"Going Places","_title_sort":"going places","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.493Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.506Z","_totalPosts":78,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","slug":"going-places","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/going-places/58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/going-places/58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4/#comments","totalPosts":78},{"_id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","title":"Travel","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"travel","updated":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.155Z","created":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.156Z","_totalPosts":188,"id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","slug":"travel","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/#comments","totalPosts":188},{"_id":"590912c6e1efff4c9916fbd3","title":"May 2012","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"may 2012","updated":"2017-05-02T23:14:14.841Z","created":"2017-05-02T23:14:14.842Z","_totalPosts":4,"id":"590912c6e1efff4c9916fbd3","slug":"may-2012","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-2012/590912c6e1efff4c9916fbd3/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/may-2012/590912c6e1efff4c9916fbd3/#comments","totalPosts":4}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2434c2774661570f35a","legacy_id":"77295","title":"HikingFull","created":"2012-09-13T15:00:49.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:02.091Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"hikingfull","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/hiking_33703a40-959a-4298-926c-980eff5f2ea8","version":1488237123,"signature":"f9f46a62c947e2042b3754135581a95f0edfce7c","width":488,"height":314,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:03.000Z","bytes":87618,"type":"upload","etag":"65a90ff921b041a98a78ad5a1e579177","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237123/clients/newmexico/hiking_33703a40-959a-4298-926c-980eff5f2ea8.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237123/clients/newmexico/hiking_33703a40-959a-4298-926c-980eff5f2ea8.jpg","exif":{"BitsPerSample":"8, 8, 8, 8","ColorSpace":"1","Compression":"6","DateTime":"2012:09:13 14:00:40","ExifImageLength":"314","ExifImageWidth":"488","ExifOffset":"416","ExifVersion":"48, 50, 50, 49","ImageDescription":"New Mexico, Carson National Forest,Wheeler Peak Wilderness, Wheeler Peak Trail, hikers Tonya Hays and Janelle Rivers on summit ridge with tundra","ImageLength":"1546","ImageWidth":"2400","Orientation":"1","PhotometricInterpretation":"5","PlanarConfiguration":"1","ResolutionUnit":"2","SamplesPerPixel":"4","Software":"Adobe Photoshop CS5 Macintosh","JPEGInterchangeFormat":"566","JPEGInterchangeFormatLength":"4638","XResolution":"720000/10000","YResolution":"720000/10000"},"original_filename":"hiking"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2434c2774661570f35a","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/hiking_33703a40-959a-4298-926c-980eff5f2ea8"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"HikingFull"},"teaser":"

For a Challenge: Wheeler Peak
The state’s highest mountain, in Carson National Forest, reaches 13,161 feet. Start early from the trailhead at Taos Ski Valley, and as you wind your way through alpine

","description":"For a Challenge: Wheeler Peak The state’s highest mountain, in Carson National Forest, reaches 13,161 feet. Start early from the trailhead at Taos Ski Valley, and as you wind your way through alpine tundra vegetation you might encounter marmots, pikas, elk, mule deer, and golden eagles. Although the spring thaw means you likely won’t need snowshoes, it’s wise to be prepared with MicroSpikes or YakTrax. Length: 15 miles round trip / Elevation: 9,400 to 13,161 feet / Strenuous You might also like: Santa Fe Baldy, La Luz Trail (Sandía Mountains near Albuquerque) For a Waterfall: Sitting Bull Falls A paved path leads to the foot of this 130-foot waterfall 43 miles west of Carlsbad. Arrive in the morning, when the sun illuminates the swimming pools below the falls, then continue up the trail to the area above the falls, on your way to Sitting Bull Spring. You’ll find many wildflowers and aquatic plants here during the summer. Just beyond the spring, perch on the canyon rim for a spectacular panorama of the Lincoln National Forest. Length: 3.8 miles round trip / Elevation: 5,250 to 5,500 feet / Easy Also consider: Trigo Canyon (Manzano Mountains near Belén), Jémez Falls (near Jémez Springs) For a Bizarre Landscape: Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness Hoodos, spires, arches, pinnacles, and mushroom rocks are just a few of the otherworldly formations you’ll encounter as you trek across the colorful eroded badlands of the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness, near Farmington. Long ago, the area was a coastal swamp, filled with trees and primitive mammals, reptiles, and dinosaurs. Today the wetland has been preserved as a desert wilderness. Pleasant temperatures make this time of year suitable for exploring this exposed landscape. You won’t find designated trails, but you can follow the well-worn flat areas surrounding the washes. Length: 4 miles round trip / Elevation: 5,770 to 5,859 feet / Easy Also consider:  Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument (near Cochiti Lake), Chavez Canyon (near Chama) For Caves: Cave Creek Start at the Panchuela campground in the Pecos Wilderness. From the trailhead, you’ll hike alongside the Panchuela and Cave creeks. The gentle incline is lined with wildflowers and thick vegetation in summer. The water eventually disappears into a series of caves—and so will you, if you’re not careful. The caves are cold, wet, and slippery; come prepared with a headlamp, warm clothes, and practical shoes. Length: 6 miles round trip / Elevation: 8,320 to 9,100 feet / Easy Also consider: North Slaughter Canyon (Carlsbad Caverns Wilderness near Carlsbad) For Solitude: Mogollon Baldy If you’re in for more than a day hike, this two- to three-day excursion culminates at a remote mountaintop fire lookout in the heart of the remote Gila Wilderness (during the summer, a Forest Service ranger is stationed here). To summit, you’ll follow Trail 182, starting at Sandy Point, along the crest of the Mogollon Range, the highest mountains in southern New Mexico. Just before reaching the peak, you’ll trade the dense forest for stunning views of southern New Mexico and Arizona. Length: 24 miles / Elevation: 9,132 to 10,770 feet / Moderate Also consider: Blackwater Hole (Coronado National Forest near Animas), Capitán Peak (Capitán Mountains near Capitán)","id":"58b4b27f4c2774661570f867","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/hiking-77294/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/hiking-77294/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/hiking-77294/","metaTitle":"Miles of Smiles","metaDescription":"

For a Challenge: Wheeler Peak
The state’s highest mountain, in Carson National Forest, reaches 13,161 feet. Start early from the trailhead at Taos Ski Valley, and as you wind your way through alpine

","cleanDescription":"For a Challenge: Wheeler Peak The state’s highest mountain, in Carson National Forest, reaches 13,161 feet. Start early from the trailhead at Taos Ski Valley, and as you wind your way through alpine tundra vegetation you might encounter marmots, pikas, elk, mule deer, and golden eagles. Although the spring thaw means you likely won’t need snowshoes, it’s wise to be prepared with MicroSpikes or YakTrax. Length: 15 miles round trip / Elevation: 9,400 to 13,161 feet / Strenuous You might also like: Santa Fe Baldy, La Luz Trail (Sandía Mountains near Albuquerque) For a Waterfall: Sitting Bull Falls A paved path leads to the foot of this 130-foot waterfall 43 miles west of Carlsbad. Arrive in the morning, when the sun illuminates the swimming pools below the falls, then continue up the trail to the area above the falls, on your way to Sitting Bull Spring. You’ll find many wildflowers and aquatic plants here during the summer. Just beyond the spring, perch on the canyon rim for a spectacular panorama of the Lincoln National Forest. Length: 3.8 miles round trip / Elevation: 5,250 to 5,500 feet / Easy Also consider: Trigo Canyon (Manzano Mountains near Belén), Jémez Falls (near Jémez Springs) For a Bizarre Landscape: Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness Hoodos, spires, arches, pinnacles, and mushroom rocks are just a few of the otherworldly formations you’ll encounter as you trek across the colorful eroded badlands of the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness, near Farmington. Long ago, the area was a coastal swamp, filled with trees and primitive mammals, reptiles, and dinosaurs. Today the wetland has been preserved as a desert wilderness. Pleasant temperatures make this time of year suitable for exploring this exposed landscape. You won’t find designated trails, but you can follow the well-worn flat areas surrounding the washes. Length: 4 miles round trip / Elevation: 5,770 to 5,859 feet / Easy Also consider:  Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument (near Cochiti Lake), Chavez Canyon (near Chama) For Caves: Cave Creek Start at the Panchuela campground in the Pecos Wilderness. From the trailhead, you’ll hike alongside the Panchuela and Cave creeks. The gentle incline is lined with wildflowers and thick vegetation in summer. The water eventually disappears into a series of caves—and so will you, if you’re not careful. The caves are cold, wet, and slippery; come prepared with a headlamp, warm clothes, and practical shoes. Length: 6 miles round trip / Elevation: 8,320 to 9,100 feet / Easy Also consider: North Slaughter Canyon (Carlsbad Caverns Wilderness near Carlsbad) For Solitude: Mogollon Baldy If you’re in for more than a day hike, this two- to three-day excursion culminates at a remote mountaintop fire lookout in the heart of the remote Gila Wilderness (during the summer, a Forest Service ranger is stationed here). To summit, you’ll follow Trail 182, starting at Sandy Point, along the crest of the Mogollon Range, the highest mountains in southern New Mexico. Just before reaching the peak, you’ll trade the dense forest for stunning views of southern New Mexico and Arizona. Length: 24 miles / Elevation: 9,132 to 10,770 feet / Moderate Also consider: Blackwater Hole (Coronado National Forest near Animas), Capitán Peak (Capitán Mountains near Capitán)","publish_start_moment":"2012-09-13T14:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-18T12:59:05.701Z"}]});
Author: Whitney Dreier