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\r\n","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e50","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f249","name":"The Staff","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.420Z","blog":"magazine","_name_sort":"the staff","updated":"2017-03-15T20:35:50.490Z","_totalPosts":77,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f249","title":"The Staff","slug":"the-staff","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/the-staff/58b4b2404c2774661570f249/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/the-staff/58b4b2404c2774661570f249/#comments","totalPosts":77},"categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f272","blog":"magazine","title":"April 1959","_title_sort":"april 1959","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.490Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.497Z","_totalPosts":1,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f272","slug":"april-1959","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-1959/58b4b2404c2774661570f272/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-1959/58b4b2404c2774661570f272/#comments","totalPosts":1},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","blog":"magazine","title":"April 2014","_title_sort":"april 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.491Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.498Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","slug":"april-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/#comments","totalPosts":16}],"teaser":"
 
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EXHIBITIONS
\r\nThe Museum Association of Taos is making it easier than ever to get the most out of its participating institutions—the E.L. Blumenschein Home, La Hacienda de los Martinez, Taos Art Museum at Fechin House, the Harwood Museum of Art, and the Millicent Rogers Museum—with its Museum Association of Taos Super Ticket. For just $25, museumgoers can visit each of the five Taos museums one time, and the ticket will be honored for an entire year. If you run out of hours to visit all the museums, the ticket is also transferrable to another art-loving friend or family member. It’s a great, low-cost way to soak in the vast art history and culture of Taos and northern New Mexico. New in April to the Fechin House is Intimate and International: The Art of Nicolai Fechin Shown at His House and Studio (April 11–September 21), which gives visitors the opportunity to witness all of Nicolai Ivanovich Fechin’s (1881–1955) creative endeavors, including paintings, drawings, and sculpture, in the home he built for his family in Taos in the late 1920s and early 1930s. To sweeten the pot for locals, all the museums are free for Taos County residents on Sundays, and the Millicent Rogers Museum is free to Taoseños every day of operation. To learn more about the museums and the Super Ticket, visit the association’s website (taosmuseums.org).
\r\n
\r\nIn Santa Fe, the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors opens Poetics of Light (April 26, 2014–March 2015), an exhibition of images from the museum’s collection—the world’s largest— of pinhole photographs. The show, which coincides with Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day (April 27), presents more than 200 photographs and 40 cameras in the museum’s Herzstein Gallery. The Museum of New Mexico Press has also published a companion book for the exhibition. Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (April 13, 2014–March 2016), examining the geology, mining, and history of the gemstone. The exhibition also explores themes of authenticity and value, while noting major Native American, Spanish, and Moorish influences on turquoise jewelry design. McLarry Fine Art, in Santa Fe, hosts Treasures from the Artist’s Vault, a retrospective of watercolors and other work by late Nambé artist Richard C. Sandoval— a former art director and editor for New Mexico Magazine.
\r\n
\r\nEn la Cocina with San Pascual (through June), at the National Hispanic Cultural Center, in Albuquerque, honors the patron saint of cooks and kitchens with more than 75 works by New Mexico artists. At Albuquerque’s Richard Levy Gallery, photographer Manjari Sharma’s elaborate and colorful representations of Hindu deities are on display (through April 11) in an exhibit titled Darshan. Sharma and a team of 35 craftspeople created props, sets, prosthetics, makeup, and costumes to develop highly stylized C-print images of Ganesh, Lord Shiva, and others. The Expo New Mexico Fine Arts Building hosts the InSight Women’s Photography Exhibit and Sale (April 5–27), featuring more than 100 jury-selected images by New Mexico women photographers.
\r\n
\r\nIn Truth or Consequences, the Second Saturday Art Hop (April 12, 6–9 p.m.) is a great way to experience the galleries and other businesses in this quirky, enchanting town. Walk-weary visitors can always hire a horse-drawn buggy for a dollar. In Las Cruces, the Las Cruces Museum of Art celebrates the city’s talented young student artists with its All-City High School Senior Art Exhibition (April 11–19). Also in Las Cruces, the Branigan Cultural Center presents an exhibition of rodeo photographs by Mel Stone (April 4–26), in conjunction with the Las Cruces Country Music Festival (see p. 14). In Deming, the Deming Arts Center presents a two-woman show featuring work by glass sculptor Patricia Schneider and portraitist Cynthia Gutierrez.
\r\n— Rob DeWalt
\r\n\r\n

“I advise you to enjoy every minute you have left of beautiful Santa Fe and make up your mind that while you will come bodily to New York you will remain in the spiritual remoteness and aloofness which may be possible in Santa Fe.”

\r\n\r\n

In a letter from one artist to another, Robert Henri expressed this powerful sentiment to John Sloan, describing the kind of impact Santa Fe can have on people. Written in 1920, it could just as easily have been written yesterday. This phenomenon may help explain how Santa Fe’s appeal has come to extend far beyond the state line, and why references to it appear in all variety of unexpected locations.

\r\n\r\n

When the New Mexico Museum of Art unveils its new exhibition, Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony, on April 25, New Mexicans will have the chance to witness a singular example of Santa Fe’s long reach. In a surprising twist, the show is part of a traveling exhibit that premiered at a Florida museum.

\r\n\r\n

The term “Santa Fe art colony” was coined by journalists in the early twentieth century to describe the influx of Anglo artists to the capital city. In reality, the artists who worked in Santa Fe constituted a diverse group with different backgrounds and styles. They did not come to join a colony, but rather were united by the desire to work in a locale that offered something different. Santa Fe’s unique blend of cultures, architecture, and landscape and the Museum of New Mexico all played a role. Some artists, such as Gustave Baumann and Fremont Ellis, settled for their entire lives, while others, like B.J.O. Nordfeldt, moved on. Interestingly, even part-timers and visitors are included in the exhibit because of their stature in the wider art world and because of the work they produced during their visits. These include John Sloan, Marsden Hartley, and Edward Hopper.

\r\n\r\n

Southwestern Allure was developed for the Boca Museum of Art, in Boca Raton. Curator Valerie Ann Leeds suggested it to the museum’s former director, George Bolge, after he told her of his interest in presenting an exhibit of Southwestern art. He assured her there was strong interest in the subject among the museum’s patrons. While there are many artists who could be included in such an exhibit, Leeds wanted to create a show that focused exclusively on the formative period of Santa Fe’s art community.

\r\n\r\n

“My intent,” she says, “was to open and expand the audience and dialogue for Santa Fe artists. I love Santa Fe and I think, from the Eastern perspective, Santa Fe artists have been lost in the shuffle, especially regarding the larger category of Southwestern art. We generally only hear about the Taos artists, and even barely that in the East!”

\r\n\r\n

Leeds searched for works from a variety of sources. The result is a stunning group of paintings from 35 artists, compiled from private collections, galleries, and museums around the country. Word quickly spread in the museum world about the show before it even opened, and Leeds began to receive inquiries from other museums. Because of this, what began as an isolated show in Boca Raton last fall soon expanded into an exhibit that would travel over the course of 10 months. The exhibit now comes home, in a way, to Santa Fe, where the paintings will be on display at the New Mexico Museum of Art from the end of this month until late July. “We are delighted to have them visit with us for a while,” said museum director Mary Kershaw, “and to exhibit them in the building which supported so many of their makers.”

\r\n\r\n

Southwestern Allure presents a full spectrum of art from the most notable of Santa Fe’s Anglo artists, who worked in the region from 1904 through 1938. Since the artists range from American art stars to lesserknown but beloved regional artists, this is a rare opportunity to see this combination of work together in one exhibit.

\r\n\r\n

One of the biggest names in the show is Edward Hopper, known for his iconic urban scenes. On a single visit to Santa Fe in 1925, Hopper worked only in watercolor and produced 13 paintings. If we think of his famous images in which architectural geometry is set off by stark lighting and shadows, we will immediately sense the same artist at work in Ranch House, Santa Fe. In his depiction of a whitewashed adobe ranch house, there is again the sense of quiet isolation— not a person in sight—and the lines formed by the building’s corners and front colonnade receding into the distance create an angular perspective and interest similar to that aroused by his urban scenes.

\r\n\r\n
\"Hopper\"
\r\nRanch House, Santa Fe, by Edward Hopper, 1925. Watercolor over pencil on paper, Williams College Museum of Art. Bequest of Lawrence H. Bloedel, Class of 1923.
\r\n\r\n

Hopper was a former student of Robert Henri, who looms large in the development of the Santa Fe art colony, due to his friendship with Edgar Lee Hewett, first director of the Museum of New Mexico. Henri worked in Santa Fe during three visits between 1916 and 1922, creating a large number of portraits and additional scenes. Henri exhibited in the art museum’s inaugural exhibition in 1917 and encouraged his friends to join him and show the results of their work in that exhibit. Both George Bellows and Leon Kroll made the trip in 1917 and displayed their work in Santa Fe’s museum. Works included Bellows’ Santuario de Chimayó, which is featured in Southwestern Allure. Bellows, who became known as one of the Ashcan School realists, shows Chimayó’s revered Santuario as the backdrop for wagons and grazing horses.

\r\n\r\n

No exhibit of the Santa Fe art colony would be complete without including Los Cinco Pintores, the group of five young artists—Will Shuster, Willard Nash, Fremont Ellis, Jozef Bakos, and Walter Mruk—who came together in Santa Fe from 1921 to 1926. For Southwestern Allure, Leeds has selected an interesting compilation of their work, with examples showing what some of the members were doing just prior to the group’s formation. For example, Jozef Bakos’s strong 1920 painting Rancho de Vallecitos shows the artist working in a Modernist mode, with bold colors applied to rustic buildings and fences with jaunty, off-kilter lines set between the smooth forms of a white horse and a dark burro in the foreground and mountains rising behind.

\r\n\r\n

The exhibit also brings back a significant work by Will Shuster, well known to Santa Feans as the creator of Zozobra. His painting The Rain Prayer was purchased by the Newark Museum in 1925 for its core collection. It’s a stunning ceremonial dance scene in the midst of falling rain, and almost 90 years have passed since Shuster sent the painting east. Now that’s a sure sign of Santa Fe’s far reach, and a most welcome homecoming. ✜

\r\n\r\n

Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony New Mexico Museum of Art. April 25–July 27. Admission: $6 for residents; $9 for nonresidents.107 West Palace Ave., Santa Fe; (505) 476-5072; nmartmuseum.org

\r\n\r\n

Stacia Lewandowski is the author of Light, Landscape and the Creative Quest: Early Artists of Santa Fe, available at the New Mexico Magazine Store (shop.nmmagazine.com).

\r\n\r\n

 

\r\n\r\n

About the main image on this page: Picnic on the Ridge, by John French Sloan, 1920. Oil on canvas, private collection, Los Angeles.

\r\n\r\n

 

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EXHIBITIONS
The Museum Association of Taos is making it easier than ever to get the most out of its participating institutions—the E.L. Blumenschein Home, La Hacienda de los Martinez, Taos Art Museum
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EXHIBITIONS
The Museum Association of Taos is making it easier than ever to get the most out of its participating institutions—the E.L. Blumenschein Home, La Hacienda de los Martinez, Taos Art Museum
","description":"EXHIBITIONS The Museum Association of Taos is making it easier than ever to get the most out of its participating institutions—the E.L. Blumenschein Home , La Hacienda de los Martinez , Taos Art Museum at Fechin House , the Harwood Museum of Art , and the Millicent Rogers Museum —with its Museum Association of Taos Super Ticket. For just $25, museumgoers can visit each of the five Taos museums one time, and the ticket will be honored for an entire year. If you run out of hours to visit all the museums, the ticket is also transferrable to another art-loving friend or family member. It’s a great, low-cost way to soak in the vast art history and culture of Taos and northern New Mexico. New in April to the Fechin House is Intimate and International: The Art of Nicolai Fechin Shown at His House and Studio (April 11–September 21), which gives visitors the opportunity to witness all of Nicolai Ivanovich Fechin’s (1881–1955) creative endeavors, including paintings, drawings, and sculpture, in the home he built for his family in Taos in the late 1920s and early 1930s. To sweeten the pot for locals, all the museums are free for Taos County residents on Sundays, and the Millicent Rogers Museum is free to Taoseños every day of operation. To learn more about the museums and the Super Ticket, visit the association’s website ( taosmuseums.org ). In Santa Fe, the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors opens Poetics of Light (April 26, 2014–March 2015), an exhibition of images from the museum’s collection—the world’s largest— of pinhole photographs. The show, which coincides with Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day (April 27), presents more than 200 photographs and 40 cameras in the museum’s Herzstein Gallery. The Museum of New Mexico Press has also published a companion book for the exhibition. Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (April 13, 2014–March 2016), examining the geology, mining, and history of the gemstone. The exhibition also explores themes of authenticity and value, while noting major Native American, Spanish, and Moorish influences on turquoise jewelry design. McLarry Fine Art , in Santa Fe, hosts Treasures from the Artist’s Vault , a retrospective of watercolors and other work by late Nambé artist Richard C. Sandoval— a former art director and editor for New Mexico Magazine . En la Cocina with San Pascual (through June), at the National Hispanic Cultural Cente r, in Albuquerque, honors the patron saint of cooks and kitchens with more than 75 works by New Mexico artists. At Albuquerque’s Richard Levy Gallery , photographer Manjari Sharma’s elaborate and colorful representations of Hindu deities are on display (through April 11) in an exhibit titled Darshan . Sharma and a team of 35 craftspeople created props, sets, prosthetics, makeup, and costumes to develop highly stylized C-print images of Ganesh, Lord Shiva, and others. The Expo New Mexico Fine Arts Building hosts the InSight Women’s Photography Exhibit and Sale (April 5–27), featuring more than 100 jury-selected images by New Mexico women photographers. In Truth or Consequences, the Second Saturday Art Hop (April 12, 6–9 p.m.) is a great way to experience the galleries and other businesses in this quirky, enchanting town. Walk-weary visitors can always hire a horse-drawn buggy for a dollar. In Las Cruces, the Las Cruces Museum of Art celebrates the city’s talented young student artists with its All-City High School Senior Art Exhibition (April 11–19). Also in Las Cruces, the Branigan Cultural Center presents an exhibition of rodeo photographs by Mel Stone (April 4–26), in conjunction with the Las Cruces Country Music Festival (see p. 14). In Deming, the Deming Arts Center presents a two-woman show featuring work by glass sculptor Patricia Schneider and portraitist Cynthia Gutierrez. — Rob DeWalt “I advise you to enjoy every minute you have left of beautiful Santa Fe and make up your mind that while you will come bodily to New York you will remain in the spiritual remoteness and aloofness which may be possible in Santa Fe.” In a letter from one artist to another, Robert Henri expressed this powerful sentiment to John Sloan, describing the kind of impact Santa Fe can have on people. Written in 1920, it could just as easily have been written yesterday. This phenomenon may help explain how Santa Fe’s appeal has come to extend far beyond the state line, and why references to it appear in all variety of unexpected locations. When the New Mexico Museum of Art unveils its new exhibition, Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony , on April 25, New Mexicans will have the chance to witness a singular example of Santa Fe’s long reach. In a surprising twist, the show is part of a traveling exhibit that premiered at a Florida museum. The term “Santa Fe art colony” was coined by journalists in the early twentieth century to describe the influx of Anglo artists to the capital city. In reality, the artists who worked in Santa Fe constituted a diverse group with different backgrounds and styles. They did not come to join a colony, but rather were united by the desire to work in a locale that offered something different. Santa Fe’s unique blend of cultures, architecture, and landscape and the Museum of New Mexico all played a role. Some artists, such as Gustave Baumann and Fremont Ellis, settled for their entire lives, while others, like B.J.O. Nordfeldt, moved on. Interestingly, even part-timers and visitors are included in the exhibit because of their stature in the wider art world and because of the work they produced during their visits. These include John Sloan, Marsden Hartley, and Edward Hopper. Southwestern Allure was developed for the Boca Museum of Art, in Boca Raton. Curator Valerie Ann Leeds suggested it to the museum’s former director, George Bolge, after he told her of his interest in presenting an exhibit of Southwestern art. He assured her there was strong interest in the subject among the museum’s patrons. While there are many artists who could be included in such an exhibit, Leeds wanted to create a show that focused exclusively on the formative period of Santa Fe’s art community. “My intent,” she says, “was to open and expand the audience and dialogue for Santa Fe artists. I love Santa Fe and I think, from the Eastern perspective, Santa Fe artists have been lost in the shuffle, especially regarding the larger category of Southwestern art. We generally only hear about the Taos artists, and even barely that in the East!” Leeds searched for works from a variety of sources. The result is a stunning group of paintings from 35 artists, compiled from private collections, galleries, and museums around the country. Word quickly spread in the museum world about the show before it even opened, and Leeds began to receive inquiries from other museums. Because of this, what began as an isolated show in Boca Raton last fall soon expanded into an exhibit that would travel over the course of 10 months. The exhibit now comes home, in a way, to Santa Fe, where the paintings will be on display at the New Mexico Museum of Art from the end of this month until late July. “We are delighted to have them visit with us for a while,” said museum director Mary Kershaw, “and to exhibit them in the building which supported so many of their makers.” Southwestern Allure presents a full spectrum of art from the most notable of Santa Fe’s Anglo artists, who worked in the region from 1904 through 1938. Since the artists range from American art stars to lesserknown but beloved regional artists, this is a rare opportunity to see this combination of work together in one exhibit. One of the biggest names in the show is Edward Hopper, known for his iconic urban scenes. On a single visit to Santa Fe in 1925, Hopper worked only in watercolor and produced 13 paintings. If we think of his famous images in which architectural geometry is set off by stark lighting and shadows, we will immediately sense the same artist at work in Ranch House, Santa Fe. In his depiction of a whitewashed adobe ranch house, there is again the sense of quiet isolation— not a person in sight—and the lines formed by the building’s corners and front colonnade receding into the distance create an angular perspective and interest similar to that aroused by his urban scenes. Ranch House , Santa Fe, by Edward Hopper, 1925. Watercolor over pencil on paper, Williams College Museum of Art. Bequest of Lawrence H. Bloedel, Class of 1923. Hopper was a former student of Robert Henri, who looms large in the development of the Santa Fe art colony, due to his friendship with Edgar Lee Hewett, first director of the Museum of New Mexico. Henri worked in Santa Fe during three visits between 1916 and 1922, creating a large number of portraits and additional scenes. Henri exhibited in the art museum’s inaugural exhibition in 1917 and encouraged his friends to join him and show the results of their work in that exhibit. Both George Bellows and Leon Kroll made the trip in 1917 and displayed their work in Santa Fe’s museum. Works included Bellows’ Santuario de Chimayó, which is featured in Southwestern Allure . Bellows, who became known as one of the Ashcan School realists, shows Chimayó’s revered Santuario as the backdrop for wagons and grazing horses. No exhibit of the Santa Fe art colony would be complete without including Los Cinco Pintores, the group of five young artists—Will Shuster, Willard Nash, Fremont Ellis, Jozef Bakos, and Walter Mruk—who came together in Santa Fe from 1921 to 1926. For Southwestern Allure , Leeds has selected an interesting compilation of their work, with examples showing what some of the members were doing just prior to the group’s formation. For example, Jozef Bakos’s strong 1920 painting Rancho de Vallecitos shows the artist working in a Modernist mode, with bold colors applied to rustic buildings and fences with jaunty, off-kilter lines set between the smooth forms of a white horse and a dark burro in the foreground and mountains rising behind. The exhibit also brings back a significant work by Will Shuster, well known to Santa Feans as the creator of Zozobra. His painting The Rain Prayer was purchased by the Newark Museum in 1925 for its core collection. It’s a stunning ceremonial dance scene in the midst of falling rain, and almost 90 years have passed since Shuster sent the painting east. Now that’s a sure sign of Santa Fe’s far reach, and a most welcome homecoming. ✜ Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony New Mexico Museum of Art. April 25–July 27. Admission: $6 for residents; $9 for nonresidents.107 West Palace Ave., Santa Fe; (505) 476-5072; nmartmuseum.org Stacia Lewandowski is the author of Light, Landscape and the Creative Quest: Early Artists of Santa Fe , available at the New Mexico Magazine Store ( shop.nmmagazine.com ).   About the main image on this page: Picnic on the Ridge , by John French Sloan, 1920. Oil on canvas, private collection, Los Angeles.  ","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f96b","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/artscapes-april-2014-85487/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/artscapes-april-2014-85487/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/artscapes-april-2014-85487/","metaTitle":"Homecoming","metaDescription":"
EXHIBITIONS
The Museum Association of Taos is making it easier than ever to get the most out of its participating institutions—the E.L. Blumenschein Home, La Hacienda de los Martinez, Taos Art Museum
","cleanDescription":"EXHIBITIONS The Museum Association of Taos is making it easier than ever to get the most out of its participating institutions—the E.L. Blumenschein Home , La Hacienda de los Martinez , Taos Art Museum at Fechin House , the Harwood Museum of Art , and the Millicent Rogers Museum —with its Museum Association of Taos Super Ticket. For just $25, museumgoers can visit each of the five Taos museums one time, and the ticket will be honored for an entire year. If you run out of hours to visit all the museums, the ticket is also transferrable to another art-loving friend or family member. It’s a great, low-cost way to soak in the vast art history and culture of Taos and northern New Mexico. New in April to the Fechin House is Intimate and International: The Art of Nicolai Fechin Shown at His House and Studio (April 11–September 21), which gives visitors the opportunity to witness all of Nicolai Ivanovich Fechin’s (1881–1955) creative endeavors, including paintings, drawings, and sculpture, in the home he built for his family in Taos in the late 1920s and early 1930s. To sweeten the pot for locals, all the museums are free for Taos County residents on Sundays, and the Millicent Rogers Museum is free to Taoseños every day of operation. To learn more about the museums and the Super Ticket, visit the association’s website ( taosmuseums.org ). In Santa Fe, the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors opens Poetics of Light (April 26, 2014–March 2015), an exhibition of images from the museum’s collection—the world’s largest— of pinhole photographs. The show, which coincides with Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day (April 27), presents more than 200 photographs and 40 cameras in the museum’s Herzstein Gallery. The Museum of New Mexico Press has also published a companion book for the exhibition. Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (April 13, 2014–March 2016), examining the geology, mining, and history of the gemstone. The exhibition also explores themes of authenticity and value, while noting major Native American, Spanish, and Moorish influences on turquoise jewelry design. McLarry Fine Art , in Santa Fe, hosts Treasures from the Artist’s Vault , a retrospective of watercolors and other work by late Nambé artist Richard C. Sandoval— a former art director and editor for New Mexico Magazine . En la Cocina with San Pascual (through June), at the National Hispanic Cultural Cente r, in Albuquerque, honors the patron saint of cooks and kitchens with more than 75 works by New Mexico artists. At Albuquerque’s Richard Levy Gallery , photographer Manjari Sharma’s elaborate and colorful representations of Hindu deities are on display (through April 11) in an exhibit titled Darshan . Sharma and a team of 35 craftspeople created props, sets, prosthetics, makeup, and costumes to develop highly stylized C-print images of Ganesh, Lord Shiva, and others. The Expo New Mexico Fine Arts Building hosts the InSight Women’s Photography Exhibit and Sale (April 5–27), featuring more than 100 jury-selected images by New Mexico women photographers. In Truth or Consequences, the Second Saturday Art Hop (April 12, 6–9 p.m.) is a great way to experience the galleries and other businesses in this quirky, enchanting town. Walk-weary visitors can always hire a horse-drawn buggy for a dollar. In Las Cruces, the Las Cruces Museum of Art celebrates the city’s talented young student artists with its All-City High School Senior Art Exhibition (April 11–19). Also in Las Cruces, the Branigan Cultural Center presents an exhibition of rodeo photographs by Mel Stone (April 4–26), in conjunction with the Las Cruces Country Music Festival (see p. 14). In Deming, the Deming Arts Center presents a two-woman show featuring work by glass sculptor Patricia Schneider and portraitist Cynthia Gutierrez. — Rob DeWalt “I advise you to enjoy every minute you have left of beautiful Santa Fe and make up your mind that while you will come bodily to New York you will remain in the spiritual remoteness and aloofness which may be possible in Santa Fe.” In a letter from one artist to another, Robert Henri expressed this powerful sentiment to John Sloan, describing the kind of impact Santa Fe can have on people. Written in 1920, it could just as easily have been written yesterday. This phenomenon may help explain how Santa Fe’s appeal has come to extend far beyond the state line, and why references to it appear in all variety of unexpected locations. When the New Mexico Museum of Art unveils its new exhibition, Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony , on April 25, New Mexicans will have the chance to witness a singular example of Santa Fe’s long reach. In a surprising twist, the show is part of a traveling exhibit that premiered at a Florida museum. The term “Santa Fe art colony” was coined by journalists in the early twentieth century to describe the influx of Anglo artists to the capital city. In reality, the artists who worked in Santa Fe constituted a diverse group with different backgrounds and styles. They did not come to join a colony, but rather were united by the desire to work in a locale that offered something different. Santa Fe’s unique blend of cultures, architecture, and landscape and the Museum of New Mexico all played a role. Some artists, such as Gustave Baumann and Fremont Ellis, settled for their entire lives, while others, like B.J.O. Nordfeldt, moved on. Interestingly, even part-timers and visitors are included in the exhibit because of their stature in the wider art world and because of the work they produced during their visits. These include John Sloan, Marsden Hartley, and Edward Hopper. Southwestern Allure was developed for the Boca Museum of Art, in Boca Raton. Curator Valerie Ann Leeds suggested it to the museum’s former director, George Bolge, after he told her of his interest in presenting an exhibit of Southwestern art. He assured her there was strong interest in the subject among the museum’s patrons. While there are many artists who could be included in such an exhibit, Leeds wanted to create a show that focused exclusively on the formative period of Santa Fe’s art community. “My intent,” she says, “was to open and expand the audience and dialogue for Santa Fe artists. I love Santa Fe and I think, from the Eastern perspective, Santa Fe artists have been lost in the shuffle, especially regarding the larger category of Southwestern art. We generally only hear about the Taos artists, and even barely that in the East!” Leeds searched for works from a variety of sources. The result is a stunning group of paintings from 35 artists, compiled from private collections, galleries, and museums around the country. Word quickly spread in the museum world about the show before it even opened, and Leeds began to receive inquiries from other museums. Because of this, what began as an isolated show in Boca Raton last fall soon expanded into an exhibit that would travel over the course of 10 months. The exhibit now comes home, in a way, to Santa Fe, where the paintings will be on display at the New Mexico Museum of Art from the end of this month until late July. “We are delighted to have them visit with us for a while,” said museum director Mary Kershaw, “and to exhibit them in the building which supported so many of their makers.” Southwestern Allure presents a full spectrum of art from the most notable of Santa Fe’s Anglo artists, who worked in the region from 1904 through 1938. Since the artists range from American art stars to lesserknown but beloved regional artists, this is a rare opportunity to see this combination of work together in one exhibit. One of the biggest names in the show is Edward Hopper, known for his iconic urban scenes. On a single visit to Santa Fe in 1925, Hopper worked only in watercolor and produced 13 paintings. If we think of his famous images in which architectural geometry is set off by stark lighting and shadows, we will immediately sense the same artist at work in Ranch House, Santa Fe. In his depiction of a whitewashed adobe ranch house, there is again the sense of quiet isolation— not a person in sight—and the lines formed by the building’s corners and front colonnade receding into the distance create an angular perspective and interest similar to that aroused by his urban scenes. Ranch House , Santa Fe, by Edward Hopper, 1925. Watercolor over pencil on paper, Williams College Museum of Art. Bequest of Lawrence H. Bloedel, Class of 1923. Hopper was a former student of Robert Henri, who looms large in the development of the Santa Fe art colony, due to his friendship with Edgar Lee Hewett, first director of the Museum of New Mexico. Henri worked in Santa Fe during three visits between 1916 and 1922, creating a large number of portraits and additional scenes. Henri exhibited in the art museum’s inaugural exhibition in 1917 and encouraged his friends to join him and show the results of their work in that exhibit. Both George Bellows and Leon Kroll made the trip in 1917 and displayed their work in Santa Fe’s museum. Works included Bellows’ Santuario de Chimayó, which is featured in Southwestern Allure . Bellows, who became known as one of the Ashcan School realists, shows Chimayó’s revered Santuario as the backdrop for wagons and grazing horses. No exhibit of the Santa Fe art colony would be complete without including Los Cinco Pintores, the group of five young artists—Will Shuster, Willard Nash, Fremont Ellis, Jozef Bakos, and Walter Mruk—who came together in Santa Fe from 1921 to 1926. For Southwestern Allure , Leeds has selected an interesting compilation of their work, with examples showing what some of the members were doing just prior to the group’s formation. For example, Jozef Bakos’s strong 1920 painting Rancho de Vallecitos shows the artist working in a Modernist mode, with bold colors applied to rustic buildings and fences with jaunty, off-kilter lines set between the smooth forms of a white horse and a dark burro in the foreground and mountains rising behind. The exhibit also brings back a significant work by Will Shuster, well known to Santa Feans as the creator of Zozobra. His painting The Rain Prayer was purchased by the Newark Museum in 1925 for its core collection. It’s a stunning ceremonial dance scene in the midst of falling rain, and almost 90 years have passed since Shuster sent the painting east. Now that’s a sure sign of Santa Fe’s far reach, and a most welcome homecoming. ✜ Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony New Mexico Museum of Art. April 25–July 27. Admission: $6 for residents; $9 for nonresidents.107 West Palace Ave., Santa Fe; (505) 476-5072; nmartmuseum.org Stacia Lewandowski is the author of Light, Landscape and the Creative Quest: Early Artists of Santa Fe , available at the New Mexico Magazine Store ( shop.nmmagazine.com ).   About the main image on this page: Picnic on the Ridge , by John French Sloan, 1920. Oil on canvas, private collection, Los Angeles.  ","publish_start_moment":"2014-04-04T16:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.464Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f96a","title":"One of Our 50 Is Missing","slug":"one-of-our-50-is-missing-85486","publish_start":"2014-04-04T15:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f274","58b4b2404c2774661570f30b","58b4b2404c2774661570f267"],"tags_ids":["59090c2de1efff4c9916f9d2","59090de2e1efff4c9916fafb","59090c10e1efff4c9916f95a"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_tagline":"Rueful anecdotes about New Mexico's mistaken geographical identity, since 1970.","created":"2014-04-04T15:35:51.000Z","legacy_id":"85486","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"one of our 50 is missing","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.850Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK
\r\nSue Johnson, of Roswell, was visiting Washington, D.C., when her aunt recommended that she visit a close friend of the family, who happened to be a North Dakota senator. Johnson dropped by the senator’s office and told his office staffer that she’d like to speak to the senator about a personal matter, letting her know that she was visiting from New Mexico. “I was quickly informed that the senator could not speak to me, as I was not a United States citizen and I would have to go to the Mexican embassy if I wanted to speak to anyone,” says Johnson.

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DRESS REHEARSAL
\r\nWhile shopping for a wedding dress in a suburb of Dallas, Kim Smith was asked where she’d be getting married. “Taos, New Mexico,” she replied. “So you’re getting married in Mexico?” the shop employee asked. “Actually, I am getting married in Taos, New Mexico,” Smith clarified. “Oh, that’s nice,” she said. “Will it be a beach wedding?” Smith told her it would be in the mountains.

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OH, BABY
\r\nAndrea Westwood, of Albuquerque, recently visited the Gerber website. When she clicked on the baby-food link, she was directed to a page with the following message: “Thank you for visiting the start healthy, stay healthy Resource Center. It appears that you do not live in the U.S. The content of this site is intended for U.S. residents only.”

\r\n\r\n

BROWNOUT
\r\nFor 23 years, Barbe Awalt, of Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, has sent friends in Maryland a Christmas gift via UPS. This past January, she didn’t receive an acknowledgment, so she called to make sure it arrived. It hadn’t. Awalt tracked it and found out that it had been sitting in the Frederick, Maryland, UPS office for three weeks, waiting for a customs inspection. She writes, “If you know Frederick, it has no international airport and it is not a border town. So you might wait for a customs inspection for the rest of your life!” Luckily, the box did not contain perishable items.

\r\n\r\n

NM NORTH
\r\nToni Thompson recently placed a phone order with a national department store. The young man asked if he could verify her address, which was on file. When he got to the city and state, he said, “Rio Rancho, Northern Minnesota, right?” Thompson writes, “I had to laugh, and said, ‘No, New Mexico,’ to which he replied, ‘I never was good with those state abbreviations.’” Question: Exactly when did Northern Minnesota achieve statehood?

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WIN, LOSE, OR DRAW?
\r\nLeigh Majors recently moved to Florida from New Mexico, and made an appointment to have her blood drawn. When Majors showed up, the clerk told her that they would not do the work, even though she had an appointment. Majors was perplexed. “We went round and round. I pressed her for an explanation, which prompted her to leave her station to get an answer.” She returned to tell Majors that they could not accept paperwork for lab work that was from out of the country. “It was then that I explained to her that New Mexico was a state.” She looked at Majors blankly. Majors said, “It’s like California, or Arizona...” She was perfectly silent for a moment, then held up her hand and said, “I’ll be right back.” She checked with the supervisor, who needed to look it up. After that, “they proceeded to process my paperwork, draw my blood, and complete my lab work without a hitch.”

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Send Us Your Story—Please!
\r\nDear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from there. Submissions will be edited for style and space. Please include your name, hometown, and state. E-mail to fifty@nmmagazine. com, or mail to Fifty, New Mexico Magazine, 495 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501.

","teaser_raw":"

YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK
Sue Johnson, of Roswell, was visiting Washington, D.C., when her aunt recommended that she visit a close friend of the family, who happened to be a North Dakota senator.

","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e61","categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","blog":"magazine","title":"April 2014","_title_sort":"april 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.491Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.498Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","slug":"april-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/#comments","totalPosts":16},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f30b","blog":"magazine","title":"One Of Our 50 Is Missing","_title_sort":"one of our 50 is missing","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.592Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.600Z","_totalPosts":68,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f30b","slug":"one-of-our-50-is-missing","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/one-of-our-50-is-missing/58b4b2404c2774661570f30b/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/one-of-our-50-is-missing/58b4b2404c2774661570f30b/#comments","totalPosts":68}],"teaser":"

YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK
Sue Johnson, of Roswell, was visiting Washington, D.C., when her aunt recommended that she visit a close friend of the family, who happened to be a North Dakota senator.

","description":"YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK Sue Johnson, of Roswell, was visiting Washington, D.C., when her aunt recommended that she visit a close friend of the family, who happened to be a North Dakota senator. Johnson dropped by the senator’s office and told his office staffer that she’d like to speak to the senator about a personal matter, letting her know that she was visiting from New Mexico. “I was quickly informed that the senator could not speak to me, as I was not a United States citizen and I would have to go to the Mexican embassy if I wanted to speak to anyone,” says Johnson. DRESS REHEARSAL While shopping for a wedding dress in a suburb of Dallas, Kim Smith was asked where she’d be getting married. “Taos, New Mexico,” she replied. “So you’re getting married in Mexico?” the shop employee asked. “Actually, I am getting married in Taos, New Mexico,” Smith clarified. “Oh, that’s nice,” she said. “Will it be a beach wedding?” Smith told her it would be in the mountains. OH, BABY Andrea Westwood, of Albuquerque, recently visited the Gerber website. When she clicked on the baby-food link, she was directed to a page with the following message: “Thank you for visiting the start healthy, stay healthy Resource Center. It appears that you do not live in the U.S. The content of this site is intended for U.S. residents only.” BROWNOUT For 23 years, Barbe Awalt, of Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, has sent friends in Maryland a Christmas gift via UPS. This past January, she didn’t receive an acknowledgment, so she called to make sure it arrived. It hadn’t. Awalt tracked it and found out that it had been sitting in the Frederick, Maryland, UPS office for three weeks, waiting for a customs inspection. She writes, “If you know Frederick, it has no international airport and it is not a border town. So you might wait for a customs inspection for the rest of your life!” Luckily, the box did not contain perishable items. NM NORTH Toni Thompson recently placed a phone order with a national department store. The young man asked if he could verify her address, which was on file. When he got to the city and state, he said, “Rio Rancho, Northern Minnesota, right?” Thompson writes, “I had to laugh, and said, ‘No, New Mexico,’ to which he replied, ‘I never was good with those state abbreviations.’” Question: Exactly when did Northern Minnesota achieve statehood? WIN, LOSE, OR DRAW? Leigh Majors recently moved to Florida from New Mexico, and made an appointment to have her blood drawn. When Majors showed up, the clerk told her that they would not do the work, even though she had an appointment. Majors was perplexed. “We went round and round. I pressed her for an explanation, which prompted her to leave her station to get an answer.” She returned to tell Majors that they could not accept paperwork for lab work that was from out of the country. “It was then that I explained to her that New Mexico was a state.” She looked at Majors blankly. Majors said, “It’s like California, or Arizona...” She was perfectly silent for a moment, then held up her hand and said, “I’ll be right back.” She checked with the supervisor, who needed to look it up. After that, “they proceeded to process my paperwork, draw my blood, and complete my lab work without a hitch.” Send Us Your Story—Please! Dear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from there. Submissions will be edited for style and space. Please include your name, hometown, and state. E-mail to fifty@nmmagazine. com , or mail to Fifty, New Mexico Magazine, 495 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501.","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f96a","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-85486/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-85486/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-85486/","metaTitle":"One of Our 50 Is Missing","metaDescription":"

YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK
Sue Johnson, of Roswell, was visiting Washington, D.C., when her aunt recommended that she visit a close friend of the family, who happened to be a North Dakota senator.

","cleanDescription":"YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK Sue Johnson, of Roswell, was visiting Washington, D.C., when her aunt recommended that she visit a close friend of the family, who happened to be a North Dakota senator. Johnson dropped by the senator’s office and told his office staffer that she’d like to speak to the senator about a personal matter, letting her know that she was visiting from New Mexico. “I was quickly informed that the senator could not speak to me, as I was not a United States citizen and I would have to go to the Mexican embassy if I wanted to speak to anyone,” says Johnson. DRESS REHEARSAL While shopping for a wedding dress in a suburb of Dallas, Kim Smith was asked where she’d be getting married. “Taos, New Mexico,” she replied. “So you’re getting married in Mexico?” the shop employee asked. “Actually, I am getting married in Taos, New Mexico,” Smith clarified. “Oh, that’s nice,” she said. “Will it be a beach wedding?” Smith told her it would be in the mountains. OH, BABY Andrea Westwood, of Albuquerque, recently visited the Gerber website. When she clicked on the baby-food link, she was directed to a page with the following message: “Thank you for visiting the start healthy, stay healthy Resource Center. It appears that you do not live in the U.S. The content of this site is intended for U.S. residents only.” BROWNOUT For 23 years, Barbe Awalt, of Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, has sent friends in Maryland a Christmas gift via UPS. This past January, she didn’t receive an acknowledgment, so she called to make sure it arrived. It hadn’t. Awalt tracked it and found out that it had been sitting in the Frederick, Maryland, UPS office for three weeks, waiting for a customs inspection. She writes, “If you know Frederick, it has no international airport and it is not a border town. So you might wait for a customs inspection for the rest of your life!” Luckily, the box did not contain perishable items. NM NORTH Toni Thompson recently placed a phone order with a national department store. The young man asked if he could verify her address, which was on file. When he got to the city and state, he said, “Rio Rancho, Northern Minnesota, right?” Thompson writes, “I had to laugh, and said, ‘No, New Mexico,’ to which he replied, ‘I never was good with those state abbreviations.’” Question: Exactly when did Northern Minnesota achieve statehood? WIN, LOSE, OR DRAW? Leigh Majors recently moved to Florida from New Mexico, and made an appointment to have her blood drawn. When Majors showed up, the clerk told her that they would not do the work, even though she had an appointment. Majors was perplexed. “We went round and round. I pressed her for an explanation, which prompted her to leave her station to get an answer.” She returned to tell Majors that they could not accept paperwork for lab work that was from out of the country. “It was then that I explained to her that New Mexico was a state.” She looked at Majors blankly. Majors said, “It’s like California, or Arizona...” She was perfectly silent for a moment, then held up her hand and said, “I’ll be right back.” She checked with the supervisor, who needed to look it up. After that, “they proceeded to process my paperwork, draw my blood, and complete my lab work without a hitch.” Send Us Your Story—Please! Dear “50” fans: Help sustain this popular feature by sharing anecdotes that you haven’t gotten around to sending in. Just dash it off if you like, and we’ll take it from there. Submissions will be edited for style and space. Please include your name, hometown, and state. E-mail to fifty@nmmagazine. com , or mail to Fifty, New Mexico Magazine, 495 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501.","publish_start_moment":"2014-04-04T15:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.464Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f969","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1e7","title":"Digging In","slug":"a-ha-feature-85433","image_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4d7","publish_start":"2014-03-28T11:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f30e","58b4b2404c2774661570f274"],"tags_ids":["59090dece1efff4c9916fb00","59090c2de1efff4c9916f9d2"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"JIM O'DONNELL","custom_tagline":"Learning to love New Mexico the hard way.","created":"2014-03-28T11:11:09.000Z","legacy_id":"85433","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"digging in","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.824Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

By the time I woke, my body temperature had dropped to the point that I was shivering violently. I rolled over into the fetal position and my sleeping bag squished. Someone was calling my name. I could hear rain. Then my little pup tent collapsed around me.

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Outside, people were yelling and scattering among the piñon and juniper. The sky was pink except for the bolts of lightning breaking the night, careening overhead and crashing into the ponderosas on a hill across the valley. There were piles of hail a foot deep and a watery muck that floated up past my ankles. Then those lofty cottoncandy clouds opened up with a tremendous dump of large, wet snowflakes. By the time I’d found my boots, I was caught in a full-on blizzard and couldn’t stop shaking. The only clothes around were a sopping pair of shorts and a muddy flannel. Throwing them on, I raced for the trucks parked somewhere out in the night.

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It was springtime in New Mexico.

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\"DiggingBighorn sheep thrive in and around the Rio Grande Gorge.
\r\n
\r\n\"Lobo
\r\nLobo Peak crowns the western portion of the Colombine Hondo Wilderness Study Area, north of Taos, the largest roadless area in the southern Rockies ecosystem. At 21 years old, I was a dropout from the University of New Mexico archaeology program. “What am I doing here?” I sat in class and wondered. I’d gotten it in my head that I could learn far more working out on a real live archaeological project. After a month of shameless begging, one of the crew chiefs took pity. I was hired onto a team surveying the path of a giant proposed oil-and-gas pipeline running from Albuquerque to the Four Corners, with branches to Gallup, Chama, and on up into southwestern Colorado.The problem from the start was simple: The Texas oil executives who traced that pipeline path across the map of our state had never walked the land. They had no idea what they were getting into. They had no idea what they were getting us into. The pipeline was pointed through some of the wildest, roughest, and most archaeologically rich land in all of North America.
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Two weeks later, the snow had melted, the mud had nearly cemented, and a searing wind was blowing out of the southwest. Our truck overheated, so our little crew of 10 walked northeast through thick stands of piñon and juniper trees along the proposed pipeline route, looking for help. The path was a dusty red. We could see north to the San Juan Mountains in Colorado, west to the Chuskas in Arizona, and east to the peaks of the Sangre de Cristo range near Taos.

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The crew trudging down the path that day was a microcosm of New Mexico. There was a Diné from Shiprock, a guy from Isleta Pueblo, a relocated rocker from Chicago, a gun lover from Indiana, a mouthy New Yorker who would go on to become a respected New Mexico archaeologist, a Hispanic from a defunct farming village, a former cowboy, and a very serious PhD candidate.

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Eventually we came to a squat hogan and a single-wide scrunched up tight against a ruddy sandstone cliff and surrounded by fat little junipers. The man who answered the trailer door wasn’t thrilled, but he welcomed us with frybread straight from the cast-iron skillet, a bowl of meaty stew, and a horrific cup of coffee.

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When his wife arrived, she wagged her finger. “There are ghosts all over out there! People have been living and dying out here for fifty thousand years! You’re stirring up them ghosts,” she said. “I don’t think this is a good idea. This is not a good idea.”

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A few weeks later, while we were excavating an ancestral Puebloan site, one of the pipeline workers from Oklahoma drove up and sincerely wanted to know “why those Indians built their homes way out here, so far away from the cities?!”

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He couldn’t comprehend that back a thousand years ago, some of the remote parts of New Mexico were far more heavily populated than they are now. He couldn’t comprehend that where we have cities now was not where people from 1,000 or 2,000 or 5,000 years ago built their towns or villages. He wasn’t the only one. The Texas oil executives certainly didn’t understand it. Seemingly, neither did the project managers at UNM. How could they not know all of this was out here?

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The whole project ground to a snail’s pace. Our crew was finding archaeological sites no one had ever recorded before. In fact, we couldn’t walk more than a quarter-mile without running into another new site and then another and then another. By law, each site in the path of the pipeline had to be properly mapped, photographed, recorded, and ultimately excavated before the pipeline could be built. Poor management wasn’t my concern, however.

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I was perhaps more content than I’d ever been. Growing up in southern Colorado with a New Mexico–enchanted family meant that we often headed south to explore. But for some reason I wasn’t ever taken with New Mexico like the rest of my family. “What are we doing here?” frequently crossed my lips.

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I wasn’t asking that anymore. By May I had stopped returning to Albuquerque on my days off. I was less and less interested in the girlfriend waiting for me in the city and increasingly desirous to spend my free days along the back roads, hiking into long-lost ruins, and talking to the other New Mexicans I met along the way.

\r\n\r\n

There was a very large Pueblo ruin buried in the caliche and sand near an empty spot on the map called Ram Mesa, out on the Navajo Nation. There didn’t appear to be anyone living nearby, but every morning an enterprising kid would show up with a cooler full of hot, fresh burritos. He made a fortune from us and then disappeared back into the cliffs and canyons.

\r\n\r\n

That site spread out around the base of the mesa and took months to map and excavate. It was full of pottery styles from all over the Southwest. The people who had lived there traded with others in Mexico, Arizona, California, Utah, Colorado, and possibly beyond. It was slated to be torn up when the pipeline crews came through.

\r\n\r\n

Day by day, I slowly learned to look out over the landscape and see where the towns and villages would have been and how the ancient New Mexicans would have used the land to alter watercourses, grow food, harvest trees, and travel. That land came completely to life as I spent more time out there, and the layers of history became clearly visible to me. So did my place in that history. I couldn’t feel anything but humbled.

\r\n\r\n

In July the monsoon season arrived.

\r\n\r\n

We could see it coming. For weeks the thunderheads built up every afternoon to the southwest. Then you could smell it, the sweetness of tropical moisture beginning to dominate the tang of desert dust. One day the sky went dark so fast, we raced to cover the site and get to camp. Too late. Coyote Canyon, a painfully sere little wash normally so dry even cactus went there to die, filled to the brim with a dangerous red, muddy flood. We spent the night sleeping in the trucks without our gear.

\r\n\r\n

It rained for weeks.

\r\n\r\n

On an October morning I woke, warm and dry in a new three-season tent. I lay there and listened to the gentle hiss of snow falling outside. Someone had a fire going, and then a pot of coffee. My equipment was better. I’d come to terms with living outside on the land in New Mexico. You just had to be prepared for anything.

\r\n\r\n

Later that morning, our crew drove the highway to a small excavation site we’d found just northwest of Cuba. A great gray owl darted from the sage and made for the highway. A truck cruising from the opposite direction clipped the owl, and it spun against the asphalt and into the brush. I wrapped it in my coat and carried it to our truck.

\r\n\r\n

It died. Right there in my hands it died. I wasn’t sad. I was amazed. Holding that bird and looking across the snowy sagebrush flats of the Jicarilla lands, the whole year filled my head all at once, and it was all about amazement, every bit of it. There was the vastness of the land, the perfectly sweet summer mornings, the soft winds that broke the heat and the harsh winds that bent you to your knees, the rains you could see coming for miles off, the powerful sun, the friends, the sweaty work, the discoveries, the seemingly endless drives, the hikes to places no cars could go …

\r\n\r\n

“What am I doing here?” was no longer a question without an answer. New Mexico wasn’t a choice for me. It was something that happened to me. “Home” was the answer. ✜

","teaser_raw":"

By the time I woke, my body temperature had dropped to the point that I was shivering violently. I rolled over into the fetal position and my sleeping bag squished. Someone was calling my name. I

","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e5d","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1e7","blog":"magazine","name":"Jim O'Donnell","_name_sort":"jim o'donnell","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.320Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.328Z","_totalPosts":3,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1e7","title":"Jim O'Donnell","slug":"jim-odonnell","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/jim-odonnell/58b4b2404c2774661570f1e7/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/jim-odonnell/58b4b2404c2774661570f1e7/#comments","totalPosts":3},"categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f30e","blog":"magazine","title":"Only in NM","_title_sort":"only in nm","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.600Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.606Z","_totalPosts":25,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f30e","slug":"only-in-nm","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/only-in-nm/58b4b2404c2774661570f30e/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/only-in-nm/58b4b2404c2774661570f30e/#comments","totalPosts":25},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","blog":"magazine","title":"April 2014","_title_sort":"april 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.491Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.498Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","slug":"april-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/#comments","totalPosts":16}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4d7","legacy_id":"85446","title":"Main","created":"2014-03-31T15:16:46.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:08.560Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"main","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/main_c16c4665-9dbb-4972-aa83-27dd51405eff","version":1488237128,"signature":"10ce3a07e8d9565cc8fe3aecc3482a72987ed84e","width":490,"height":332,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:08.000Z","bytes":27860,"type":"upload","etag":"087b1c2340c83c54911736f7af75e373","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237128/clients/newmexico/main_c16c4665-9dbb-4972-aa83-27dd51405eff.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237128/clients/newmexico/main_c16c4665-9dbb-4972-aa83-27dd51405eff.jpg","original_filename":"main"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4d7","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/main_c16c4665-9dbb-4972-aa83-27dd51405eff"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Main"},"teaser":"

By the time I woke, my body temperature had dropped to the point that I was shivering violently. I rolled over into the fetal position and my sleeping bag squished. Someone was calling my name. I

","description":"By the time I woke, my body temperature had dropped to the point that I was shivering violently. I rolled over into the fetal position and my sleeping bag squished. Someone was calling my name. I could hear rain. Then my little pup tent collapsed around me. Outside, people were yelling and scattering among the piñon and juniper. The sky was pink except for the bolts of lightning breaking the night, careening overhead and crashing into the ponderosas on a hill across the valley. There were piles of hail a foot deep and a watery muck that floated up past my ankles. Then those lofty cottoncandy clouds opened up with a tremendous dump of large, wet snowflakes. By the time I’d found my boots, I was caught in a full-on blizzard and couldn’t stop shaking. The only clothes around were a sopping pair of shorts and a muddy flannel. Throwing them on, I raced for the trucks parked somewhere out in the night. It was springtime in New Mexico.   Bighorn sheep thrive in and around the Rio Grande Gorge. Lobo Peak crowns the western portion of the Colombine Hondo Wilderness Study Area, north of Taos, the largest roadless area in the southern Rockies ecosystem. At 21 years old, I was a dropout from the University of New Mexico archaeology program. “What am I doing here?” I sat in class and wondered. I’d gotten it in my head that I could learn far more working out on a real live archaeological project. After a month of shameless begging, one of the crew chiefs took pity. I was hired onto a team surveying the path of a giant proposed oil-and-gas pipeline running from Albuquerque to the Four Corners, with branches to Gallup, Chama, and on up into southwestern Colorado.The problem from the start was simple: The Texas oil executives who traced that pipeline path across the map of our state had never walked the land. They had no idea what they were getting into. They had no idea what they were getting us into. The pipeline was pointed through some of the wildest, roughest, and most archaeologically rich land in all of North America.   Two weeks later, the snow had melted, the mud had nearly cemented, and a searing wind was blowing out of the southwest. Our truck overheated, so our little crew of 10 walked northeast through thick stands of piñon and juniper trees along the proposed pipeline route, looking for help. The path was a dusty red. We could see north to the San Juan Mountains in Colorado, west to the Chuskas in Arizona, and east to the peaks of the Sangre de Cristo range near Taos. The crew trudging down the path that day was a microcosm of New Mexico. There was a Diné from Shiprock, a guy from Isleta Pueblo, a relocated rocker from Chicago, a gun lover from Indiana, a mouthy New Yorker who would go on to become a respected New Mexico archaeologist, a Hispanic from a defunct farming village, a former cowboy, and a very serious PhD candidate. Eventually we came to a squat hogan and a single-wide scrunched up tight against a ruddy sandstone cliff and surrounded by fat little junipers. The man who answered the trailer door wasn’t thrilled, but he welcomed us with frybread straight from the cast-iron skillet, a bowl of meaty stew, and a horrific cup of coffee. When his wife arrived, she wagged her finger. “There are ghosts all over out there! People have been living and dying out here for fifty thousand years! You’re stirring up them ghosts,” she said. “I don’t think this is a good idea. This is not a good idea.” A few weeks later, while we were excavating an ancestral Puebloan site, one of the pipeline workers from Oklahoma drove up and sincerely wanted to know “why those Indians built their homes way out here, so far away from the cities?!” He couldn’t comprehend that back a thousand years ago, some of the remote parts of New Mexico were far more heavily populated than they are now. He couldn’t comprehend that where we have cities now was not where people from 1,000 or 2,000 or 5,000 years ago built their towns or villages. He wasn’t the only one. The Texas oil executives certainly didn’t understand it. Seemingly, neither did the project managers at UNM. How could they not know all of this was out here? The whole project ground to a snail’s pace. Our crew was finding archaeological sites no one had ever recorded before. In fact, we couldn’t walk more than a quarter-mile without running into another new site and then another and then another. By law, each site in the path of the pipeline had to be properly mapped, photographed, recorded, and ultimately excavated before the pipeline could be built. Poor management wasn’t my concern, however. I was perhaps more content than I’d ever been. Growing up in southern Colorado with a New Mexico–enchanted family meant that we often headed south to explore. But for some reason I wasn’t ever taken with New Mexico like the rest of my family. “What are we doing here?” frequently crossed my lips. I wasn’t asking that anymore. By May I had stopped returning to Albuquerque on my days off. I was less and less interested in the girlfriend waiting for me in the city and increasingly desirous to spend my free days along the back roads, hiking into long-lost ruins, and talking to the other New Mexicans I met along the way. There was a very large Pueblo ruin buried in the caliche and sand near an empty spot on the map called Ram Mesa, out on the Navajo Nation. There didn’t appear to be anyone living nearby, but every morning an enterprising kid would show up with a cooler full of hot, fresh burritos. He made a fortune from us and then disappeared back into the cliffs and canyons. That site spread out around the base of the mesa and took months to map and excavate. It was full of pottery styles from all over the Southwest. The people who had lived there traded with others in Mexico, Arizona, California, Utah, Colorado, and possibly beyond. It was slated to be torn up when the pipeline crews came through. Day by day, I slowly learned to look out over the landscape and see where the towns and villages would have been and how the ancient New Mexicans would have used the land to alter watercourses, grow food, harvest trees, and travel. That land came completely to life as I spent more time out there, and the layers of history became clearly visible to me. So did my place in that history. I couldn’t feel anything but humbled. In July the monsoon season arrived. We could see it coming. For weeks the thunderheads built up every afternoon to the southwest. Then you could smell it, the sweetness of tropical moisture beginning to dominate the tang of desert dust. One day the sky went dark so fast, we raced to cover the site and get to camp. Too late. Coyote Canyon, a painfully sere little wash normally so dry even cactus went there to die, filled to the brim with a dangerous red, muddy flood. We spent the night sleeping in the trucks without our gear. It rained for weeks. On an October morning I woke, warm and dry in a new three-season tent. I lay there and listened to the gentle hiss of snow falling outside. Someone had a fire going, and then a pot of coffee. My equipment was better. I’d come to terms with living outside on the land in New Mexico. You just had to be prepared for anything. Later that morning, our crew drove the highway to a small excavation site we’d found just northwest of Cuba. A great gray owl darted from the sage and made for the highway. A truck cruising from the opposite direction clipped the owl, and it spun against the asphalt and into the brush. I wrapped it in my coat and carried it to our truck. It died. Right there in my hands it died. I wasn’t sad. I was amazed. Holding that bird and looking across the snowy sagebrush flats of the Jicarilla lands, the whole year filled my head all at once, and it was all about amazement, every bit of it. There was the vastness of the land, the perfectly sweet summer mornings, the soft winds that broke the heat and the harsh winds that bent you to your knees, the rains you could see coming for miles off, the powerful sun, the friends, the sweaty work, the discoveries, the seemingly endless drives, the hikes to places no cars could go … “What am I doing here?” was no longer a question without an answer. New Mexico wasn’t a choice for me. It was something that happened to me. “Home” was the answer. ✜","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f969","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/a-ha-feature-85433/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/a-ha-feature-85433/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/a-ha-feature-85433/","metaTitle":"Digging In","metaDescription":"

By the time I woke, my body temperature had dropped to the point that I was shivering violently. I rolled over into the fetal position and my sleeping bag squished. Someone was calling my name. I

","cleanDescription":"By the time I woke, my body temperature had dropped to the point that I was shivering violently. I rolled over into the fetal position and my sleeping bag squished. Someone was calling my name. I could hear rain. Then my little pup tent collapsed around me. Outside, people were yelling and scattering among the piñon and juniper. The sky was pink except for the bolts of lightning breaking the night, careening overhead and crashing into the ponderosas on a hill across the valley. There were piles of hail a foot deep and a watery muck that floated up past my ankles. Then those lofty cottoncandy clouds opened up with a tremendous dump of large, wet snowflakes. By the time I’d found my boots, I was caught in a full-on blizzard and couldn’t stop shaking. The only clothes around were a sopping pair of shorts and a muddy flannel. Throwing them on, I raced for the trucks parked somewhere out in the night. It was springtime in New Mexico.   Bighorn sheep thrive in and around the Rio Grande Gorge. Lobo Peak crowns the western portion of the Colombine Hondo Wilderness Study Area, north of Taos, the largest roadless area in the southern Rockies ecosystem. At 21 years old, I was a dropout from the University of New Mexico archaeology program. “What am I doing here?” I sat in class and wondered. I’d gotten it in my head that I could learn far more working out on a real live archaeological project. After a month of shameless begging, one of the crew chiefs took pity. I was hired onto a team surveying the path of a giant proposed oil-and-gas pipeline running from Albuquerque to the Four Corners, with branches to Gallup, Chama, and on up into southwestern Colorado.The problem from the start was simple: The Texas oil executives who traced that pipeline path across the map of our state had never walked the land. They had no idea what they were getting into. They had no idea what they were getting us into. The pipeline was pointed through some of the wildest, roughest, and most archaeologically rich land in all of North America.   Two weeks later, the snow had melted, the mud had nearly cemented, and a searing wind was blowing out of the southwest. Our truck overheated, so our little crew of 10 walked northeast through thick stands of piñon and juniper trees along the proposed pipeline route, looking for help. The path was a dusty red. We could see north to the San Juan Mountains in Colorado, west to the Chuskas in Arizona, and east to the peaks of the Sangre de Cristo range near Taos. The crew trudging down the path that day was a microcosm of New Mexico. There was a Diné from Shiprock, a guy from Isleta Pueblo, a relocated rocker from Chicago, a gun lover from Indiana, a mouthy New Yorker who would go on to become a respected New Mexico archaeologist, a Hispanic from a defunct farming village, a former cowboy, and a very serious PhD candidate. Eventually we came to a squat hogan and a single-wide scrunched up tight against a ruddy sandstone cliff and surrounded by fat little junipers. The man who answered the trailer door wasn’t thrilled, but he welcomed us with frybread straight from the cast-iron skillet, a bowl of meaty stew, and a horrific cup of coffee. When his wife arrived, she wagged her finger. “There are ghosts all over out there! People have been living and dying out here for fifty thousand years! You’re stirring up them ghosts,” she said. “I don’t think this is a good idea. This is not a good idea.” A few weeks later, while we were excavating an ancestral Puebloan site, one of the pipeline workers from Oklahoma drove up and sincerely wanted to know “why those Indians built their homes way out here, so far away from the cities?!” He couldn’t comprehend that back a thousand years ago, some of the remote parts of New Mexico were far more heavily populated than they are now. He couldn’t comprehend that where we have cities now was not where people from 1,000 or 2,000 or 5,000 years ago built their towns or villages. He wasn’t the only one. The Texas oil executives certainly didn’t understand it. Seemingly, neither did the project managers at UNM. How could they not know all of this was out here? The whole project ground to a snail’s pace. Our crew was finding archaeological sites no one had ever recorded before. In fact, we couldn’t walk more than a quarter-mile without running into another new site and then another and then another. By law, each site in the path of the pipeline had to be properly mapped, photographed, recorded, and ultimately excavated before the pipeline could be built. Poor management wasn’t my concern, however. I was perhaps more content than I’d ever been. Growing up in southern Colorado with a New Mexico–enchanted family meant that we often headed south to explore. But for some reason I wasn’t ever taken with New Mexico like the rest of my family. “What are we doing here?” frequently crossed my lips. I wasn’t asking that anymore. By May I had stopped returning to Albuquerque on my days off. I was less and less interested in the girlfriend waiting for me in the city and increasingly desirous to spend my free days along the back roads, hiking into long-lost ruins, and talking to the other New Mexicans I met along the way. There was a very large Pueblo ruin buried in the caliche and sand near an empty spot on the map called Ram Mesa, out on the Navajo Nation. There didn’t appear to be anyone living nearby, but every morning an enterprising kid would show up with a cooler full of hot, fresh burritos. He made a fortune from us and then disappeared back into the cliffs and canyons. That site spread out around the base of the mesa and took months to map and excavate. It was full of pottery styles from all over the Southwest. The people who had lived there traded with others in Mexico, Arizona, California, Utah, Colorado, and possibly beyond. It was slated to be torn up when the pipeline crews came through. Day by day, I slowly learned to look out over the landscape and see where the towns and villages would have been and how the ancient New Mexicans would have used the land to alter watercourses, grow food, harvest trees, and travel. That land came completely to life as I spent more time out there, and the layers of history became clearly visible to me. So did my place in that history. I couldn’t feel anything but humbled. In July the monsoon season arrived. We could see it coming. For weeks the thunderheads built up every afternoon to the southwest. Then you could smell it, the sweetness of tropical moisture beginning to dominate the tang of desert dust. One day the sky went dark so fast, we raced to cover the site and get to camp. Too late. Coyote Canyon, a painfully sere little wash normally so dry even cactus went there to die, filled to the brim with a dangerous red, muddy flood. We spent the night sleeping in the trucks without our gear. It rained for weeks. On an October morning I woke, warm and dry in a new three-season tent. I lay there and listened to the gentle hiss of snow falling outside. Someone had a fire going, and then a pot of coffee. My equipment was better. I’d come to terms with living outside on the land in New Mexico. You just had to be prepared for anything. Later that morning, our crew drove the highway to a small excavation site we’d found just northwest of Cuba. A great gray owl darted from the sage and made for the highway. A truck cruising from the opposite direction clipped the owl, and it spun against the asphalt and into the brush. I wrapped it in my coat and carried it to our truck. It died. Right there in my hands it died. I wasn’t sad. I was amazed. Holding that bird and looking across the snowy sagebrush flats of the Jicarilla lands, the whole year filled my head all at once, and it was all about amazement, every bit of it. There was the vastness of the land, the perfectly sweet summer mornings, the soft winds that broke the heat and the harsh winds that bent you to your knees, the rains you could see coming for miles off, the powerful sun, the friends, the sweaty work, the discoveries, the seemingly endless drives, the hikes to places no cars could go … “What am I doing here?” was no longer a question without an answer. New Mexico wasn’t a choice for me. It was something that happened to me. “Home” was the answer. ✜","publish_start_moment":"2014-03-28T11:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.464Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f968","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","title":"Exotic Abiquiú","slug":"abiquiu-85432","publish_start":"2014-03-28T11:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb","58b4b2404c2774661570f274"],"tags_ids":["59090e46e1efff4c9916fb37","59090da3e1efff4c9916fad6","59090c2de1efff4c9916f9d2"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"Jen Judge","custom_tagline":"A dealer in tribal arts from around the globe fashions a uniquely New Mexican aesthetic in Abiquiú.","created":"2014-03-28T11:10:49.000Z","legacy_id":"85432","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"exotic abiquiú","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.712Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

\r\n\r\n
NEED TO KNOW
\r\nBosshard Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. From U.S. 84 in Abiquiú, turn onto County Road 187, found across the street from Bode’s General Store. The gallery (#10) is located at the top of a short hill on your right. (505) 685-0061; johnbosshard.com
\r\n\r\n

Built by the Miguel Gonzales family 100 years ago, John Bosshard’s Abiquiú house sits on layer upon layer of uniquely New Mexican history. Measured on the village time line, the house might be a youngster, but its double-thick adobe walls and hand-dug stone-lined basement delve deeply into the long tradition of indigenous building methods around here. Next door, its older cousin on the property, the 19th-century Gonzales y Bode (pronounced BO-dee) Mercantile, boasts a true Wild West past.

\r\n\r\n

“I love the history out here. I’m fascinated by it,” says Bosshard (pronounced BOSS-hard). A savvy gallery owner who scours the world for unique tribal art and sells it from the old mercantile, he knows a thing or two about the real deal. His sales inventory and personal collections include architectural and ethnographic artifacts like a large Han Dynasty terra-cotta horse from China; a Song Dynasty wooden figure of Kuan Yin, the Chinese female bodhisattva of compassion; and group of spirit panels and shields from the Mentawai people of western Sumatra.

\r\n\r\n

With his taste for the exotic, maybe it’s no wonder he settled into the Gonzales home, which makes a good case for New Mexico’s own brand of exotic—you won’t find a place like this anywhere else. In a modest village adobe and workaday warehouse from the 19th century, Bosshard found the perfect stage for his eclectic yet harmonious collections of sacred art, folk art, and found objects. Their deft commingling seems to unite and elevate the whole place— art, architecture, and historic setting—to the level of an original aesthetic at once fiercely local and wildly cosmopolitan. Call it Global-Tribal Southwest style.

\r\n\r\n

The story of Bosshard’s place begins with that old store. In its heyday, Abiquiú was the jumping-off point for the Old Spanish Trail to California, and later became a stagecoach stop where the road climbed the hill into what was then a Native American Pueblo. Photos from the 1880s show the plaza packed with heavily loaded wagons, fringed surreys, and cow ponies hitched to a rail.

\r\n\r\n

Seeing a business opportunity on this busy plaza, Miguel Gonzales built a cavernous two-story, falsefronted adobe mercantile to serve the trade in the 1880s. He added the house 30-some years later. Into this bustling scene, a German immigrant named Martin John Bode arrived in around 1920. He worked in the store, eventually became a partner in the Gonzales y Bode Mercantile, then bought out Gonzales. Later he moved the store, now called Bode’s, to its current, still thriving location down on the highway.

\r\n\r\n

That backstory gave Bosshard one good reason to buy the place. For another, the spotlessly renovated house sits in a rich artistic community with movie location views and trance-inducing grounds. Finally, the attached historic mercantile makes a great sales gallery for Bosshard’s art business, while giving others ready access to his unique collecting aesthetic.

\r\n\r\n

Bosshard hardly took a straight-line path getting here. A Wisconsin native, the now 65-year-old came out of college as an artist who “hated being cooped up in the studio. Art’s cool, but travel’s cooler,” he says. So he took off on yearlong trips well ahead of the adventure-travel boom, ranging from Peru to Kathmandu, from Ecuador to Indonesia, from Africa to Thailand. As a trekker in the 1960s, he explored the Himalayas and Andes, admiring the indigenous art and crafts, buying what intrigued him, and shipping it home. Pretty soon, people were buying the art he collected.

\r\n\r\n

“One year, I thought, I could make a living doing this.”

\r\n\r\n

After a long stint in California, Bosshard moved to Taos in 1984, eventually opening galleries there and in Santa Fe. Business boomed, and to this day he takes frequent buying trips abroad.

\r\n\r\n

Although Bosshard enjoyed Taos, several years ago he started looking around for a second home. Abiquiú caught his eye. One day his real estate broker called. “He told me about this place next to [Georgia] O’Keeffe’s, a historic property with potential for a warehouse for my art,” Bosshard recalls. “He said, ‘Come see it. You’ll get a kick out of it’—famous last words.”

\r\n\r\n

At first he planned to stay in Taos, use the Abiquiú property as a getaway, and store art in the mercantile to “feed my galleries.” But as he fixed it up and spent time here, the attraction deepened. This was home.

\r\n\r\n

Today, Bosshard shares the property with his partner, Kanchana Phumipol, a Thai textile dealer and weaver who goes by the name Daeng. Gallery manager Matthew de Lellis lives in the building between the home and the gallery.

\r\n\r\n

The two-story, roughly 2,500-square-foot house rests on its original footprint. First-floor rooms orbit a central staircase that climbs to a second-story bedroom and office. If you enter through the back door, which seems natural, you pass a mudroom and laundry whose slanting roof suggests a converted porch. Next comes the kitchen, beautifully rendered in contemporary stainless appliances, composite stone countertops, and tile. The stove sits in a plaster alcove.

\r\n\r\n

Open to the kitchen across a low counter, the dining area features a long wooden table beside sunny windows facing south to the mercantile. A door leads to the sitting room, with a TV, while a brief hallway passes under the stairs to the north-side living room and lone downstairs bedroom.

\r\n\r\n

Sandy-colored, skip-troweled plaster imparts a bumpy feel to the interior walls. Wood floors yield pleasantly to the step. New energyefficient windows showcase the views over the Río Chama Valley; Abiquiú’s distinctive promontory El Cerrito, its unusual white hills immortalized by O’Keeffe; the distant Dar al Islam mosque; and the far mesas rising in waves to the northern horizon.

\r\n\r\n

As you might expect, Bosshard’s art collection covers nearly every horizontal surface and most vertical ones, too—antiques, paintings, sculptures of animals, tables fashioned from venerable doors, drums, tapestries, and a hundred other como se llamas he fetched from the far corners of the world.

\r\n\r\n

Outside, the west, north, and east portales throw deep shade for summer lounging. Bosshard has landscaped the grounds with flagstone, a variety of plantings, grass, a pleasantly burbling water feature, and a fireplace anchoring one corner of the patio. These indoor/outdoor spaces are his favorite part of the house.

\r\n\r\n

“We spend a lot of time outdoors,” he says. “This is like a dining area and a living area. One of the things I love the most is coming out with my morning cup of coffee and watching the sun blazing red on the rock.” He gestures toward El Cerrito. “And my commute is across the parking lot.”

\r\n\r\n

That building needed serious attention when Bosshard bought the place. Before he could move his art inventory into the old store, he cleaned it out and “shored it up to make it sound.” He also visually united the home and gallery with matching plaster, a shady portal leading from a gravel parking area to the back of the house, and a perennial garden on the home’s south side.

\r\n\r\n

The lovely home and setting, engaging backstory, and ample room for business might have been what first attracted Bosshard, but that’s not why he settled in Abiquiú.

\r\n\r\n

“The biggest surprise here was what a nice community of people there was,” Bosshard says. “I didn’t realize what a great bunch of artists and writers live back up in the arroyos and canyons and along the bosque. I thought I was going to be kind of lonely out here, but we’re always having dinners together, that kind of thing. A couple years after I bought it, I’d met so many nice people, I decided to move out here.”

\r\n\r\n

Some of his neighbors like to stop by and talk about the old days. “They’ll say, ‘I remember when I was a little hijo and I’d sit up on the counter and eat candy,’ ” Bosshard says.

\r\n\r\n

History, after all, is about people. By bringing the house and mercantile into the 21st century, Bosshard has earned his own place in the books. ✜

","teaser_raw":"

NEED TO KNOW
Bosshard Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. From U.S. 84 in Abiquiú, turn onto County Road 187, found across the street from Bode’s General Store. The gallery (#10) is located
","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e51","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","name":"Charles C. Poling","image_id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.238Z","blog":"magazine","_name_sort":"charles c. poling","updated":"2017-04-07T19:23:02.520Z","image":{"_id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","original_public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a","title":"Charles Poling","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a","version":1491592948,"signature":"a1e9de47ffcf2af2552c8ef4d964d757d7127df1","width":3057,"height":3057,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-04-07T19:22:28.000Z","bytes":819746,"type":"upload","etag":"51266d9e3fdd066a649893da5ac973f6","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1491592948/clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1491592948/clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a.jpg","original_filename":"file"},"alt_text_raw":"Charles Poling","credits":"Charles Poling","content_owner":"magazine","title_sort":"charles poling","updated":"2017-04-07T19:22:38.125Z","deleted":false,"created":"2017-04-07T19:22:38.126Z","id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Charles Poling"},"_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","title":"Charles C. Poling","slug":"charles-c-poling","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/charles-c-poling/58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/charles-c-poling/58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8/#comments","totalPosts":16},"categories":[{"_id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","title":"Travel","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"travel","updated":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.155Z","created":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.156Z","_totalPosts":188,"id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","slug":"travel","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/#comments","totalPosts":188},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb","blog":"magazine","title":"NM Living","_title_sort":"nm living","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.583Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.589Z","_totalPosts":15,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb","slug":"nm-living","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/nm-living/58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/nm-living/58b4b2404c2774661570f2fb/#comments","totalPosts":15},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","blog":"magazine","title":"April 2014","_title_sort":"april 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.491Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.498Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","slug":"april-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/#comments","totalPosts":16}],"teaser":"

NEED TO KNOW
Bosshard Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. From U.S. 84 in Abiquiú, turn onto County Road 187, found across the street from Bode’s General Store. The gallery (#10) is located
","description":"NEED TO KNOW Bosshard Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. From U.S. 84 in Abiquiú, turn onto County Road 187, found across the street from Bode’s General Store. The gallery (#10) is located at the top of a short hill on your right. (505) 685-0061; johnbosshard.com Built by the Miguel Gonzales family 100 years ago, John Bosshard’s Abiquiú house sits on layer upon layer of uniquely New Mexican history. Measured on the village time line, the house might be a youngster, but its double-thick adobe walls and hand-dug stone-lined basement delve deeply into the long tradition of indigenous building methods around here. Next door, its older cousin on the property, the 19th-century Gonzales y Bode (pronounced BO-dee) Mercantile, boasts a true Wild West past. “I love the history out here. I’m fascinated by it,” says Bosshard (pronounced BOSS-hard). A savvy gallery owner who scours the world for unique tribal art and sells it from the old mercantile, he knows a thing or two about the real deal. His sales inventory and personal collections include architectural and ethnographic artifacts like a large Han Dynasty terra-cotta horse from China; a Song Dynasty wooden figure of Kuan Yin, the Chinese female bodhisattva of compassion; and group of spirit panels and shields from the Mentawai people of western Sumatra. With his taste for the exotic, maybe it’s no wonder he settled into the Gonzales home, which makes a good case for New Mexico’s own brand of exotic—you won’t find a place like this anywhere else. In a modest village adobe and workaday warehouse from the 19th century, Bosshard found the perfect stage for his eclectic yet harmonious collections of sacred art, folk art, and found objects. Their deft commingling seems to unite and elevate the whole place— art, architecture, and historic setting—to the level of an original aesthetic at once fiercely local and wildly cosmopolitan. Call it Global-Tribal Southwest style. The story of Bosshard’s place begins with that old store. In its heyday, Abiquiú was the jumping-off point for the Old Spanish Trail to California, and later became a stagecoach stop where the road climbed the hill into what was then a Native American Pueblo. Photos from the 1880s show the plaza packed with heavily loaded wagons, fringed surreys, and cow ponies hitched to a rail. Seeing a business opportunity on this busy plaza, Miguel Gonzales built a cavernous two-story, falsefronted adobe mercantile to serve the trade in the 1880s. He added the house 30-some years later. Into this bustling scene, a German immigrant named Martin John Bode arrived in around 1920. He worked in the store, eventually became a partner in the Gonzales y Bode Mercantile, then bought out Gonzales. Later he moved the store, now called Bode’s, to its current, still thriving location down on the highway. That backstory gave Bosshard one good reason to buy the place. For another, the spotlessly renovated house sits in a rich artistic community with movie location views and trance-inducing grounds. Finally, the attached historic mercantile makes a great sales gallery for Bosshard’s art business, while giving others ready access to his unique collecting aesthetic. Bosshard hardly took a straight-line path getting here. A Wisconsin native, the now 65-year-old came out of college as an artist who “hated being cooped up in the studio. Art’s cool, but travel’s cooler,” he says. So he took off on yearlong trips well ahead of the adventure-travel boom, ranging from Peru to Kathmandu, from Ecuador to Indonesia, from Africa to Thailand. As a trekker in the 1960s, he explored the Himalayas and Andes, admiring the indigenous art and crafts, buying what intrigued him, and shipping it home. Pretty soon, people were buying the art he collected. “One year, I thought, I could make a living doing this.” After a long stint in California, Bosshard moved to Taos in 1984, eventually opening galleries there and in Santa Fe. Business boomed, and to this day he takes frequent buying trips abroad. Although Bosshard enjoyed Taos, several years ago he started looking around for a second home. Abiquiú caught his eye. One day his real estate broker called. “He told me about this place next to [Georgia] O’Keeffe’s, a historic property with potential for a warehouse for my art,” Bosshard recalls. “He said, ‘Come see it. You’ll get a kick out of it’—famous last words.” At first he planned to stay in Taos, use the Abiquiú property as a getaway, and store art in the mercantile to “feed my galleries.” But as he fixed it up and spent time here, the attraction deepened. This was home. Today, Bosshard shares the property with his partner, Kanchana Phumipol, a Thai textile dealer and weaver who goes by the name Daeng. Gallery manager Matthew de Lellis lives in the building between the home and the gallery. The two-story, roughly 2,500-square-foot house rests on its original footprint. First-floor rooms orbit a central staircase that climbs to a second-story bedroom and office. If you enter through the back door, which seems natural, you pass a mudroom and laundry whose slanting roof suggests a converted porch. Next comes the kitchen, beautifully rendered in contemporary stainless appliances, composite stone countertops, and tile. The stove sits in a plaster alcove. Open to the kitchen across a low counter, the dining area features a long wooden table beside sunny windows facing south to the mercantile. A door leads to the sitting room, with a TV, while a brief hallway passes under the stairs to the north-side living room and lone downstairs bedroom. Sandy-colored, skip-troweled plaster imparts a bumpy feel to the interior walls. Wood floors yield pleasantly to the step. New energyefficient windows showcase the views over the Río Chama Valley; Abiquiú’s distinctive promontory El Cerrito, its unusual white hills immortalized by O’Keeffe; the distant Dar al Islam mosque; and the far mesas rising in waves to the northern horizon. As you might expect, Bosshard’s art collection covers nearly every horizontal surface and most vertical ones, too—antiques, paintings, sculptures of animals, tables fashioned from venerable doors, drums, tapestries, and a hundred other como se llamas he fetched from the far corners of the world. Outside, the west, north, and east portales throw deep shade for summer lounging. Bosshard has landscaped the grounds with flagstone, a variety of plantings, grass, a pleasantly burbling water feature, and a fireplace anchoring one corner of the patio. These indoor/outdoor spaces are his favorite part of the house. “We spend a lot of time outdoors,” he says. “This is like a dining area and a living area. One of the things I love the most is coming out with my morning cup of coffee and watching the sun blazing red on the rock.” He gestures toward El Cerrito. “And my commute is across the parking lot.” That building needed serious attention when Bosshard bought the place. Before he could move his art inventory into the old store, he cleaned it out and “shored it up to make it sound.” He also visually united the home and gallery with matching plaster, a shady portal leading from a gravel parking area to the back of the house, and a perennial garden on the home’s south side. The lovely home and setting, engaging backstory, and ample room for business might have been what first attracted Bosshard, but that’s not why he settled in Abiquiú. “The biggest surprise here was what a nice community of people there was,” Bosshard says. “I didn’t realize what a great bunch of artists and writers live back up in the arroyos and canyons and along the bosque. I thought I was going to be kind of lonely out here, but we’re always having dinners together, that kind of thing. A couple years after I bought it, I’d met so many nice people, I decided to move out here.” Some of his neighbors like to stop by and talk about the old days. “They’ll say, ‘I remember when I was a little hijo and I’d sit up on the counter and eat candy,’ ” Bosshard says. History, after all, is about people. By bringing the house and mercantile into the 21st century, Bosshard has earned his own place in the books. ✜","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f968","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/abiquiu-85432/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/abiquiu-85432/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/abiquiu-85432/","metaTitle":"Exotic Abiquiú","metaDescription":"

NEED TO KNOW
Bosshard Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. From U.S. 84 in Abiquiú, turn onto County Road 187, found across the street from Bode’s General Store. The gallery (#10) is located
","cleanDescription":"NEED TO KNOW Bosshard Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. From U.S. 84 in Abiquiú, turn onto County Road 187, found across the street from Bode’s General Store. The gallery (#10) is located at the top of a short hill on your right. (505) 685-0061; johnbosshard.com Built by the Miguel Gonzales family 100 years ago, John Bosshard’s Abiquiú house sits on layer upon layer of uniquely New Mexican history. Measured on the village time line, the house might be a youngster, but its double-thick adobe walls and hand-dug stone-lined basement delve deeply into the long tradition of indigenous building methods around here. Next door, its older cousin on the property, the 19th-century Gonzales y Bode (pronounced BO-dee) Mercantile, boasts a true Wild West past. “I love the history out here. I’m fascinated by it,” says Bosshard (pronounced BOSS-hard). A savvy gallery owner who scours the world for unique tribal art and sells it from the old mercantile, he knows a thing or two about the real deal. His sales inventory and personal collections include architectural and ethnographic artifacts like a large Han Dynasty terra-cotta horse from China; a Song Dynasty wooden figure of Kuan Yin, the Chinese female bodhisattva of compassion; and group of spirit panels and shields from the Mentawai people of western Sumatra. With his taste for the exotic, maybe it’s no wonder he settled into the Gonzales home, which makes a good case for New Mexico’s own brand of exotic—you won’t find a place like this anywhere else. In a modest village adobe and workaday warehouse from the 19th century, Bosshard found the perfect stage for his eclectic yet harmonious collections of sacred art, folk art, and found objects. Their deft commingling seems to unite and elevate the whole place— art, architecture, and historic setting—to the level of an original aesthetic at once fiercely local and wildly cosmopolitan. Call it Global-Tribal Southwest style. The story of Bosshard’s place begins with that old store. In its heyday, Abiquiú was the jumping-off point for the Old Spanish Trail to California, and later became a stagecoach stop where the road climbed the hill into what was then a Native American Pueblo. Photos from the 1880s show the plaza packed with heavily loaded wagons, fringed surreys, and cow ponies hitched to a rail. Seeing a business opportunity on this busy plaza, Miguel Gonzales built a cavernous two-story, falsefronted adobe mercantile to serve the trade in the 1880s. He added the house 30-some years later. Into this bustling scene, a German immigrant named Martin John Bode arrived in around 1920. He worked in the store, eventually became a partner in the Gonzales y Bode Mercantile, then bought out Gonzales. Later he moved the store, now called Bode’s, to its current, still thriving location down on the highway. That backstory gave Bosshard one good reason to buy the place. For another, the spotlessly renovated house sits in a rich artistic community with movie location views and trance-inducing grounds. Finally, the attached historic mercantile makes a great sales gallery for Bosshard’s art business, while giving others ready access to his unique collecting aesthetic. Bosshard hardly took a straight-line path getting here. A Wisconsin native, the now 65-year-old came out of college as an artist who “hated being cooped up in the studio. Art’s cool, but travel’s cooler,” he says. So he took off on yearlong trips well ahead of the adventure-travel boom, ranging from Peru to Kathmandu, from Ecuador to Indonesia, from Africa to Thailand. As a trekker in the 1960s, he explored the Himalayas and Andes, admiring the indigenous art and crafts, buying what intrigued him, and shipping it home. Pretty soon, people were buying the art he collected. “One year, I thought, I could make a living doing this.” After a long stint in California, Bosshard moved to Taos in 1984, eventually opening galleries there and in Santa Fe. Business boomed, and to this day he takes frequent buying trips abroad. Although Bosshard enjoyed Taos, several years ago he started looking around for a second home. Abiquiú caught his eye. One day his real estate broker called. “He told me about this place next to [Georgia] O’Keeffe’s, a historic property with potential for a warehouse for my art,” Bosshard recalls. “He said, ‘Come see it. You’ll get a kick out of it’—famous last words.” At first he planned to stay in Taos, use the Abiquiú property as a getaway, and store art in the mercantile to “feed my galleries.” But as he fixed it up and spent time here, the attraction deepened. This was home. Today, Bosshard shares the property with his partner, Kanchana Phumipol, a Thai textile dealer and weaver who goes by the name Daeng. Gallery manager Matthew de Lellis lives in the building between the home and the gallery. The two-story, roughly 2,500-square-foot house rests on its original footprint. First-floor rooms orbit a central staircase that climbs to a second-story bedroom and office. If you enter through the back door, which seems natural, you pass a mudroom and laundry whose slanting roof suggests a converted porch. Next comes the kitchen, beautifully rendered in contemporary stainless appliances, composite stone countertops, and tile. The stove sits in a plaster alcove. Open to the kitchen across a low counter, the dining area features a long wooden table beside sunny windows facing south to the mercantile. A door leads to the sitting room, with a TV, while a brief hallway passes under the stairs to the north-side living room and lone downstairs bedroom. Sandy-colored, skip-troweled plaster imparts a bumpy feel to the interior walls. Wood floors yield pleasantly to the step. New energyefficient windows showcase the views over the Río Chama Valley; Abiquiú’s distinctive promontory El Cerrito, its unusual white hills immortalized by O’Keeffe; the distant Dar al Islam mosque; and the far mesas rising in waves to the northern horizon. As you might expect, Bosshard’s art collection covers nearly every horizontal surface and most vertical ones, too—antiques, paintings, sculptures of animals, tables fashioned from venerable doors, drums, tapestries, and a hundred other como se llamas he fetched from the far corners of the world. Outside, the west, north, and east portales throw deep shade for summer lounging. Bosshard has landscaped the grounds with flagstone, a variety of plantings, grass, a pleasantly burbling water feature, and a fireplace anchoring one corner of the patio. These indoor/outdoor spaces are his favorite part of the house. “We spend a lot of time outdoors,” he says. “This is like a dining area and a living area. One of the things I love the most is coming out with my morning cup of coffee and watching the sun blazing red on the rock.” He gestures toward El Cerrito. “And my commute is across the parking lot.” That building needed serious attention when Bosshard bought the place. Before he could move his art inventory into the old store, he cleaned it out and “shored it up to make it sound.” He also visually united the home and gallery with matching plaster, a shady portal leading from a gravel parking area to the back of the house, and a perennial garden on the home’s south side. The lovely home and setting, engaging backstory, and ample room for business might have been what first attracted Bosshard, but that’s not why he settled in Abiquiú. “The biggest surprise here was what a nice community of people there was,” Bosshard says. “I didn’t realize what a great bunch of artists and writers live back up in the arroyos and canyons and along the bosque. I thought I was going to be kind of lonely out here, but we’re always having dinners together, that kind of thing. A couple years after I bought it, I’d met so many nice people, I decided to move out here.” Some of his neighbors like to stop by and talk about the old days. “They’ll say, ‘I remember when I was a little hijo and I’d sit up on the counter and eat candy,’ ” Bosshard says. History, after all, is about people. By bringing the house and mercantile into the 21st century, Bosshard has earned his own place in the books. ✜","publish_start_moment":"2014-03-28T11:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.472Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f967","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1f6","title":"Santa Fe Gets Its Bloom On","slug":"botanic-garden-85431","image_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4d2","publish_start":"2014-03-28T11:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","58f5533b46da1c146c0fc752","58b4b2404c2774661570f274"],"tags_ids":["59090e46e1efff4c9916fb37","59090ce8e1efff4c9916fa49","59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20","59090c2de1efff4c9916f9d2"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"Jen Judge","custom_tagline":"The new Botanical Garden on Museum Hill anticipates spring.","created":"2014-03-28T11:10:27.000Z","legacy_id":"85431","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"santa fe gets its bloom on","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.734Z","active":true,"description_raw":"\r\n
\"Trail
\r\n
\r\nNEED TO KNOW

\r\nSanta Fe Botanical Garden
\r\nWhere: 715 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill Hours: Open daily, April–October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Guided tours at 10 a.m. and
\r\n2 p.m. Cost: $5; discounts for seniors, active military, and students. Children 12 and under free. Annual Membership: $35 for free admission to all three locations as well as free or reduced-cost admission to more than 300 botanic gardens nationwide. For more information on all of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden locations: (505) 471-9103; santafebotanicalgarden.org
\r\n
\r\nBlooming New Mexico
\r\nWhere can you see the desert turn green—and pink, red, white, and yellow? Here are a few options.
\r\n
\r\nThe Rio Grande Botanic Garden Part of the Albuquerque Biological Park, which includes a don’t-miss zoo and aquarium, this big daddy of New Mexico gardens includes 52 acres of xeriscapes, a Japanese garden, butterfly pavilion, heritage farm, and more. 2601 Central Ave. NW; (505) 768- 2000; bioparksociety.org/botanicgarden
\r\n
\r\nThe Albuquerque Rose Garden More than 1,200 bushes of hybrids, floribundas, rugosas, miniatures, climbers, and more welcome visitors to the Tony Hillerman Library. Members of the Albuquerque Rose Society offer regular sessions on pruning and growing your own. 8205 Apache Ave. NE; albuquerquerose.com/garden
\r\n
\r\nThe University of New Mexico Campus Arboretum Learning continues outside the classroom with UNM’s impressive landscape of trees, bushes, grasses, and flowers. Drop into the Welcome Center in the Cornell Parking Structure for info on self-guided tours. Welcome Center parking: 2401 Redondo Dr. NE; (505) 277-1938; pats.unm.edu
\r\n
\r\nLiving Desert Zoo & Gardens State Park Animals and plants native to the Chihuahuan Desert enrich a visit to nearby Carlsbad Caverns. 1504 Miehls Dr., Carlsbad; (575) 887-5516; emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD/livingdes ertstatepark
\r\n
\r\nCity of Rocks State Park Located between Silver City and Deming, the park’s botanical garden shows off cacti, ocotillo, agave, desert bird of paradise, and even oak shrubs. Keep an eye out for desert tortoises, too. 327 Highway 61, Faywood; (575) 536-2800; gilawilderness.com/travel/cityofrocks.htm
\r\n
\r\nChile Pepper Institute Teaching Garden New Mexico State University scientists know more about New Mexico’s favorite food than almost anyone on earth. Tours, both self-guided and guided, June–Oct.; 113 W. University Ave., Las Cruces; (575) 646-3661; chilepepperinstitute.org
\r\n
\r\nFarmington Demonstration Garden Master Gardeners and NMSU’s Agricultural Sciences Center oversee this xeriscape with selfguided walking tours and an annual Mother’s Day event. 300 Road 4063, Farmington. (505) 960-7757; farmingtonsc.nmsu.edu/xeriscape
\r\n
\r\nRio Rancho WaterWise Garden Another mash-up of Master Gardeners and NMSU, demonstrating xeriscape principles. 950 Pine Tree Rd., Rio Rancho; (505) 867-2582; rioranchowaterwisegarden.wordpress.com
\r\n\r\n\r\n

Winter chose to tarry the day I met Clayton Bass at the Santa Fe Botanical Garden. Swathed in sweaters, we wandered a meandering path flanked by gloriously stacked rocks, with not a single flower
\r\nin sight.

\r\n\r\n

No matter. We gardeners possess imaginations best described as—ahem— florid. Even when the sky whispers “snow,” we dream of spring.

\r\n\r\n

“You’re seeing things begin to bloom in April,” said Bass, the organization’s chief executive officer, sweeping his arm past furry blankets of yellowed grasses. Together, our minds beheld the branches of fruit trees sprinkled with blossoms. Around their roots, a circular field of flowering bulbs enacted a horticultural rhapsody in blue. Butterflies and hummingbirds appeared.

\r\n\r\n

We moved to the heart of the garden, a 14-acre dream that’s taking root atop Museum Hill just across Camino Lejo from the Wheelwright Museum, Museum of International Folk Art, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, and Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. The two acres of phase one opened last July, making this the garden’s first “real” spring.

\r\n\r\n

“We should have a pretty spectacular bloom,” Bass said.

\r\n\r\n

To create this oasis, the garden hired internationally renowned landscaper W. Gary Smith, whose work includes the Children’s Garden at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, in Austin, and restoration of the 60-acre garden at Henry Francis du Pont’s historic Winterthur estate, in Delaware. Along with professional crews and an army of volunteers, he combined the realities of desert life with the rose-garden fantasies of longtime supporters. Concerns over water conservation guided them, including the creation of La Rambla, a twisting creek bed that encourages each drop of rain to slow down and seep in.

\r\n\r\n

The flora ranges from agaves, chollas, and yuccas to poppies, herbs, evergreens, oaks, and more. Most are indigenous, though some hail from parallel climate zones around the globe. For someone who’s lost her share of gardening struggles, the bounty put me into something akin to a sugar stupor. Bass assured me that was part of the plan.

\r\n\r\n

“We bring together in a concentrated place a way to view the variety of plants you might see across New Mexico that are hard to grow so closely together,” he said. “And it’s all in this extraordinary location with a beautiful view of the mountains and access to four world-class museums. “You could park once and spend the day. That’s pretty fantastic.”

\r\n\r\n

Botanic gardens, by definition, are places of learning. Once the province of scientists studying the medicinal benefits of plants, they evolved into public emporiums that invite agronomists and amateurs alike. To serve its educational purpose, the Santa Fe Botanical Garden built in stopping points under soon-to-bevine- covered ramadas to shelter classes and tour groups. And it went one step further by incorporating the City Different’s artistic sensibilities.

\r\n\r\n

Bass and I marveled at clay sculptor Christy Hengst’s whimsical birds, screen-printed with texts and images in mimeograph blue (on exhibit through May 31). On April 26, the garden will open a temporary show of Kevin Box’s origami-like metal sculptures.

\r\n\r\n

Candyce Garrett’s three-piece granite Emergence, commands phase one’s permanent installation space. In coming years, phases two and three will feature sculptures by Tom Joyce and Ramón José López.

\r\n\r\n

Other highlights include the restoration of a WPA-era gabion, a rock structure that supports the property’s arroyo, and a flaming-red bridge that once served road duty near Las Vegas, New Mexico.

\r\n\r\n

“We packed a lot into two acres,” Bass said. “We sought to create a soothing public space. You see people hanging out on the benches reading or having a conversation. We want people to connect with nature, and we feel this is a good place to do it.”

\r\n\r\n

It’s about time. The SFBG organization has gone 26 years without a botanic garden of its own, although it has long claimed two spectacular natural habitats. The Lenora Curtin Wetland Preserve, in La Cienega, demonstrates what happens “when you add water to the desert,” Bass said. The Ortiz Mountains Educational Preserve shows off a high-altitude environment near Cerrillos.

\r\n\r\n

Obtaining a garden, though, took years of hunting for a location and refining many gardeners’ competing visions into a plan certain to attract as many visitors as butterflies. Well before its first birthday and just a third of its eventual size, it’s hitting the mark.

\r\n\r\n

As Bass and I chatted, a young couple strolled past. Something in the way they moved tipped me off. “I think they’re sizing this up for a wedding,” I murmured.

\r\n\r\n

“Oh, absolutely,” Bass whispered back. “I figured them for that immediately. We’ve already had two weddings. I’d like to see musical performances, Shakespeare in the garden—the possibilities are limitless.”

\r\n\r\n

We were at the exit gate, but I didn’t want to leave. I wanted to keep wandering until the green tips of grape hyacinth poked through the cold soil. I wanted to see the peach trees bathed in blooms. I wanted to hear the buzz of bees. Apparently, I’m not alone.

\r\n\r\n

“In one year, we’ve gone from 600 members to 1,500,” Bass said.

\r\n\r\n

His count was shy by one. On the way out, I picked up a membership form, determined to make this the new garden of my dreams. ✜

\r\n\r\n

Kate Nelson, an award-winning journalist and author of the biography Helen Hardin: A Straight Line Curved, lends volunteer labor to the native-plants garden and labyrinth at the Placitas Community Library.

","teaser_raw":"
\"Trail

NEED TO KNOW

Santa Fe Botanical Garden
Where: 715 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill Hours: Open daily, April–October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Guided tours at 10 a.m. and
2 p.m. Cost: $5; discounts for seniors,
","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e3c","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1f6","name":"Kate Nelson","image_id":"591384b9da8f9b60115b35c5","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.335Z","blog":"magazine","_name_sort":"kate nelson","updated":"2017-05-10T21:23:12.398Z","image":{"_id":"591384b9da8f9b60115b35c5","original_public_id":"clients/newmexico/KateNelson_BW_bd3ffb62-7e95-48ab-9632-e0d990a22fb7","title":"Kate Nelson","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/KateNelson_BW_bd3ffb62-7e95-48ab-9632-e0d990a22fb7","version":1494451375,"signature":"8515a455aa8d1c45cb2ea23564361315ae326164","width":734,"height":728,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-05-10T21:22:55.000Z","bytes":82933,"type":"upload","etag":"3e5ea89d7f98b867a4b167c98a3d55bd","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1494451375/clients/newmexico/KateNelson_BW_bd3ffb62-7e95-48ab-9632-e0d990a22fb7.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1494451375/clients/newmexico/KateNelson_BW_bd3ffb62-7e95-48ab-9632-e0d990a22fb7.jpg","exif":{"Copyright":"Copyright Minesh Bacrania (2016)"},"original_filename":"file"},"alt_text_raw":"Kate Nelson","content_owner":"magazine","title_sort":"kate nelson","updated":"2017-05-10T21:23:05.506Z","deleted":false,"created":"2017-05-10T21:23:05.507Z","id":"591384b9da8f9b60115b35c5","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/KateNelson_BW_bd3ffb62-7e95-48ab-9632-e0d990a22fb7"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Kate Nelson"},"_totalPosts":48,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1f6","title":"Kate Nelson","slug":"kate-nelson","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/kate-nelson/58b4b2404c2774661570f1f6/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/kate-nelson/58b4b2404c2774661570f1f6/#comments","totalPosts":48},"categories":[{"_id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","title":"Travel","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"travel","updated":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.155Z","created":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.156Z","_totalPosts":188,"id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","slug":"travel","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/#comments","totalPosts":188},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","blog":"magazine","title":"Going Places","_title_sort":"going places","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.493Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.506Z","_totalPosts":78,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","slug":"going-places","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/going-places/58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/going-places/58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4/#comments","totalPosts":78},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","blog":"magazine","title":"April 2014","_title_sort":"april 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.491Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.498Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","slug":"april-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/#comments","totalPosts":16}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4d2","legacy_id":"85441","title":"Main -botanical -garden","created":"2014-03-31T13:50:15.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:08.454Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"main -botanical -garden","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/main_botanical_garden_46a24611-c266-4bb0-b7c7-8f456318fb58","version":1488237128,"signature":"d39eca45d8f8326b959d14ab49d5baf27468645e","width":490,"height":285,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:08.000Z","bytes":65652,"type":"upload","etag":"bbe486453f57a271ebda1534ac603295","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237128/clients/newmexico/main_botanical_garden_46a24611-c266-4bb0-b7c7-8f456318fb58.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237128/clients/newmexico/main_botanical_garden_46a24611-c266-4bb0-b7c7-8f456318fb58.jpg","original_filename":"main-botanical-garden"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4d2","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/main_botanical_garden_46a24611-c266-4bb0-b7c7-8f456318fb58"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Main -botanical -garden"},"tags":[{"_id":"59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20","title":"Events","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"events","updated":"2017-05-02T22:48:09.170Z","created":"2017-05-02T22:48:09.171Z","_totalPosts":62,"id":"59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20","slug":"events","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/tag/events/59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/tag/events/59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20/#comments","totalPosts":62}],"teaser":"
\"Trail

NEED TO KNOW

Santa Fe Botanical Garden
Where: 715 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill Hours: Open daily, April–October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Guided tours at 10 a.m. and
2 p.m. Cost: $5; discounts for seniors,
","description":"NEED TO KNOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden Where: 715 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill Hours: Open daily, April–October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Guided tours at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Cost: $5; discounts for seniors, active military, and students. Children 12 and under free. Annual Membership: $35 for free admission to all three locations as well as free or reduced-cost admission to more than 300 botanic gardens nationwide. For more information on all of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden locations: (505) 471-9103; santafebotanicalgarden.org Blooming New Mexico Where can you see the desert turn green—and pink, red, white, and yellow? Here are a few options. The Rio Grande Botanic Garden Part of the Albuquerque Biological Park , which includes a don’t-miss zoo and aquarium, this big daddy of New Mexico gardens includes 52 acres of xeriscapes, a Japanese garden, butterfly pavilion, heritage farm, and more. 2601 Central Ave. NW; (505) 768- 2000; bioparksociety.org/botanicgarden The Albuquerque Rose Garden More than 1,200 bushes of hybrids, floribundas, rugosas, miniatures, climbers, and more welcome visitors to the Tony Hillerman Library. Members of the Albuquerque Rose Society offer regular sessions on pruning and growing your own. 8205 Apache Ave. NE; albuquerquerose.com/garden The University of New Mexico Campus Arboretum Learning continues outside the classroom with UNM’s impressive landscape of trees, bushes, grasses, and flowers. Drop into the Welcome Center in the Cornell Parking Structure for info on self-guided tours. Welcome Center parking: 2401 Redondo Dr. NE; (505) 277-1938; pats.unm.edu Living Desert Zoo & Gardens State Park Animals and plants native to the Chihuahuan Desert enrich a visit to nearby Carlsbad Caverns. 1504 Miehls Dr., Carlsbad; (575) 887-5516; emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD/livingdes ertstatepark City of Rocks State Park Located between Silver City and Deming, the park’s botanical garden shows off cacti, ocotillo, agave, desert bird of paradise, and even oak shrubs. Keep an eye out for desert tortoises, too. 327 Highway 61, Faywood; (575) 536-2800; gilawilderness.com/travel/cityofrocks.htm Chile Pepper Institute Teaching Garden New Mexico State University scientists know more about New Mexico’s favorite food than almost anyone on earth. Tours, both self-guided and guided, June–Oct.; 113 W. University Ave., Las Cruces; (575) 646-3661; chilepepperinstitute.org Farmington Demonstration Garden Master Gardeners and NMSU’s Agricultural Sciences Center oversee this xeriscape with selfguided walking tours and an annual Mother’s Day event. 300 Road 4063, Farmington. (505) 960-7757; farmingtonsc.nmsu.edu/xeriscape Rio Rancho WaterWise Garden Another mash-up of Master Gardeners and NMSU, demonstrating xeriscape principles. 950 Pine Tree Rd., Rio Rancho; (505) 867-2582; rioranchowaterwisegarden.wordpress.com Winter chose to tarry the day I met Clayton Bass at the Santa Fe Botanical Garden. Swathed in sweaters, we wandered a meandering path flanked by gloriously stacked rocks, with not a single flower in sight. No matter. We gardeners possess imaginations best described as—ahem— florid. Even when the sky whispers “snow,” we dream of spring. “You’re seeing things begin to bloom in April,” said Bass, the organization’s chief executive officer, sweeping his arm past furry blankets of yellowed grasses. Together, our minds beheld the branches of fruit trees sprinkled with blossoms. Around their roots, a circular field of flowering bulbs enacted a horticultural rhapsody in blue. Butterflies and hummingbirds appeared. We moved to the heart of the garden, a 14-acre dream that’s taking root atop Museum Hill just across Camino Lejo from the Wheelwright Museum, Museum of International Folk Art, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, and Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. The two acres of phase one opened last July, making this the garden’s first “real” spring. “We should have a pretty spectacular bloom,” Bass said. To create this oasis, the garden hired internationally renowned landscaper W. Gary Smith, whose work includes the Children’s Garden at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, in Austin, and restoration of the 60-acre garden at Henry Francis du Pont’s historic Winterthur estate, in Delaware. Along with professional crews and an army of volunteers, he combined the realities of desert life with the rose-garden fantasies of longtime supporters. Concerns over water conservation guided them, including the creation of La Rambla, a twisting creek bed that encourages each drop of rain to slow down and seep in. The flora ranges from agaves, chollas, and yuccas to poppies, herbs, evergreens, oaks, and more. Most are indigenous, though some hail from parallel climate zones around the globe. For someone who’s lost her share of gardening struggles, the bounty put me into something akin to a sugar stupor. Bass assured me that was part of the plan. “We bring together in a concentrated place a way to view the variety of plants you might see across New Mexico that are hard to grow so closely together,” he said. “And it’s all in this extraordinary location with a beautiful view of the mountains and access to four world-class museums. “You could park once and spend the day. That’s pretty fantastic.” Botanic gardens, by definition, are places of learning. Once the province of scientists studying the medicinal benefits of plants, they evolved into public emporiums that invite agronomists and amateurs alike. To serve its educational purpose, the Santa Fe Botanical Garden built in stopping points under soon-to-bevine- covered ramadas to shelter classes and tour groups. And it went one step further by incorporating the City Different’s artistic sensibilities. Bass and I marveled at clay sculptor Christy Hengst’s whimsical birds, screen-printed with texts and images in mimeograph blue (on exhibit through May 31). On April 26, the garden will open a temporary show of Kevin Box’s origami-like metal sculptures. Candyce Garrett’s three-piece granite  Emergence , commands phase one’s permanent installation space. In coming years, phases two and three will feature sculptures by Tom Joyce and Ramón José López. Other highlights include the restoration of a WPA-era gabion, a rock structure that supports the property’s arroyo, and a flaming-red bridge that once served road duty near Las Vegas, New Mexico. “We packed a lot into two acres,” Bass said. “We sought to create a soothing public space. You see people hanging out on the benches reading or having a conversation. We want people to connect with nature, and we feel this is a good place to do it.” It’s about time. The SFBG organization has gone 26 years without a botanic garden of its own, although it has long claimed two spectacular natural habitats. The Lenora Curtin Wetland Preserve, in La Cienega, demonstrates what happens “when you add water to the desert,” Bass said. The Ortiz Mountains Educational Preserve shows off a high-altitude environment near Cerrillos. Obtaining a garden, though, took years of hunting for a location and refining many gardeners’ competing visions into a plan certain to attract as many visitors as butterflies. Well before its first birthday and just a third of its eventual size, it’s hitting the mark. As Bass and I chatted, a young couple strolled past. Something in the way they moved tipped me off. “I think they’re sizing this up for a wedding,” I murmured. “Oh, absolutely,” Bass whispered back. “I figured them for that immediately. We’ve already had two weddings. I’d like to see musical performances, Shakespeare in the garden—the possibilities are limitless.” We were at the exit gate, but I didn’t want to leave. I wanted to keep wandering until the green tips of grape hyacinth poked through the cold soil. I wanted to see the peach trees bathed in blooms. I wanted to hear the buzz of bees. Apparently, I’m not alone. “In one year, we’ve gone from 600 members to 1,500,” Bass said. His count was shy by one. On the way out, I picked up a membership form, determined to make this the new garden of my dreams. ✜ Kate Nelson, an award-winning journalist and author of the biography Helen Hardin: A Straight Line Curved , lends volunteer labor to the native-plants garden and labyrinth at the Placitas Community Library.","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f967","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/botanic-garden-85431/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/botanic-garden-85431/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/botanic-garden-85431/","metaTitle":"Santa Fe Gets Its Bloom On","metaDescription":"
\"Trail

NEED TO KNOW

Santa Fe Botanical Garden
Where: 715 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill Hours: Open daily, April–October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Guided tours at 10 a.m. and
2 p.m. Cost: $5; discounts for seniors,
","cleanDescription":"NEED TO KNOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden Where: 715 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill Hours: Open daily, April–October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Guided tours at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Cost: $5; discounts for seniors, active military, and students. Children 12 and under free. Annual Membership: $35 for free admission to all three locations as well as free or reduced-cost admission to more than 300 botanic gardens nationwide. For more information on all of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden locations: (505) 471-9103; santafebotanicalgarden.org Blooming New Mexico Where can you see the desert turn green—and pink, red, white, and yellow? Here are a few options. The Rio Grande Botanic Garden Part of the Albuquerque Biological Park , which includes a don’t-miss zoo and aquarium, this big daddy of New Mexico gardens includes 52 acres of xeriscapes, a Japanese garden, butterfly pavilion, heritage farm, and more. 2601 Central Ave. NW; (505) 768- 2000; bioparksociety.org/botanicgarden The Albuquerque Rose Garden More than 1,200 bushes of hybrids, floribundas, rugosas, miniatures, climbers, and more welcome visitors to the Tony Hillerman Library. Members of the Albuquerque Rose Society offer regular sessions on pruning and growing your own. 8205 Apache Ave. NE; albuquerquerose.com/garden The University of New Mexico Campus Arboretum Learning continues outside the classroom with UNM’s impressive landscape of trees, bushes, grasses, and flowers. Drop into the Welcome Center in the Cornell Parking Structure for info on self-guided tours. Welcome Center parking: 2401 Redondo Dr. NE; (505) 277-1938; pats.unm.edu Living Desert Zoo & Gardens State Park Animals and plants native to the Chihuahuan Desert enrich a visit to nearby Carlsbad Caverns. 1504 Miehls Dr., Carlsbad; (575) 887-5516; emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD/livingdes ertstatepark City of Rocks State Park Located between Silver City and Deming, the park’s botanical garden shows off cacti, ocotillo, agave, desert bird of paradise, and even oak shrubs. Keep an eye out for desert tortoises, too. 327 Highway 61, Faywood; (575) 536-2800; gilawilderness.com/travel/cityofrocks.htm Chile Pepper Institute Teaching Garden New Mexico State University scientists know more about New Mexico’s favorite food than almost anyone on earth. Tours, both self-guided and guided, June–Oct.; 113 W. University Ave., Las Cruces; (575) 646-3661; chilepepperinstitute.org Farmington Demonstration Garden Master Gardeners and NMSU’s Agricultural Sciences Center oversee this xeriscape with selfguided walking tours and an annual Mother’s Day event. 300 Road 4063, Farmington. (505) 960-7757; farmingtonsc.nmsu.edu/xeriscape Rio Rancho WaterWise Garden Another mash-up of Master Gardeners and NMSU, demonstrating xeriscape principles. 950 Pine Tree Rd., Rio Rancho; (505) 867-2582; rioranchowaterwisegarden.wordpress.com Winter chose to tarry the day I met Clayton Bass at the Santa Fe Botanical Garden. Swathed in sweaters, we wandered a meandering path flanked by gloriously stacked rocks, with not a single flower in sight. No matter. We gardeners possess imaginations best described as—ahem— florid. Even when the sky whispers “snow,” we dream of spring. “You’re seeing things begin to bloom in April,” said Bass, the organization’s chief executive officer, sweeping his arm past furry blankets of yellowed grasses. Together, our minds beheld the branches of fruit trees sprinkled with blossoms. Around their roots, a circular field of flowering bulbs enacted a horticultural rhapsody in blue. Butterflies and hummingbirds appeared. We moved to the heart of the garden, a 14-acre dream that’s taking root atop Museum Hill just across Camino Lejo from the Wheelwright Museum, Museum of International Folk Art, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, and Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. The two acres of phase one opened last July, making this the garden’s first “real” spring. “We should have a pretty spectacular bloom,” Bass said. To create this oasis, the garden hired internationally renowned landscaper W. Gary Smith, whose work includes the Children’s Garden at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, in Austin, and restoration of the 60-acre garden at Henry Francis du Pont’s historic Winterthur estate, in Delaware. Along with professional crews and an army of volunteers, he combined the realities of desert life with the rose-garden fantasies of longtime supporters. Concerns over water conservation guided them, including the creation of La Rambla, a twisting creek bed that encourages each drop of rain to slow down and seep in. The flora ranges from agaves, chollas, and yuccas to poppies, herbs, evergreens, oaks, and more. Most are indigenous, though some hail from parallel climate zones around the globe. For someone who’s lost her share of gardening struggles, the bounty put me into something akin to a sugar stupor. Bass assured me that was part of the plan. “We bring together in a concentrated place a way to view the variety of plants you might see across New Mexico that are hard to grow so closely together,” he said. “And it’s all in this extraordinary location with a beautiful view of the mountains and access to four world-class museums. “You could park once and spend the day. That’s pretty fantastic.” Botanic gardens, by definition, are places of learning. Once the province of scientists studying the medicinal benefits of plants, they evolved into public emporiums that invite agronomists and amateurs alike. To serve its educational purpose, the Santa Fe Botanical Garden built in stopping points under soon-to-bevine- covered ramadas to shelter classes and tour groups. And it went one step further by incorporating the City Different’s artistic sensibilities. Bass and I marveled at clay sculptor Christy Hengst’s whimsical birds, screen-printed with texts and images in mimeograph blue (on exhibit through May 31). On April 26, the garden will open a temporary show of Kevin Box’s origami-like metal sculptures. Candyce Garrett’s three-piece granite  Emergence , commands phase one’s permanent installation space. In coming years, phases two and three will feature sculptures by Tom Joyce and Ramón José López. Other highlights include the restoration of a WPA-era gabion, a rock structure that supports the property’s arroyo, and a flaming-red bridge that once served road duty near Las Vegas, New Mexico. “We packed a lot into two acres,” Bass said. “We sought to create a soothing public space. You see people hanging out on the benches reading or having a conversation. We want people to connect with nature, and we feel this is a good place to do it.” It’s about time. The SFBG organization has gone 26 years without a botanic garden of its own, although it has long claimed two spectacular natural habitats. The Lenora Curtin Wetland Preserve, in La Cienega, demonstrates what happens “when you add water to the desert,” Bass said. The Ortiz Mountains Educational Preserve shows off a high-altitude environment near Cerrillos. Obtaining a garden, though, took years of hunting for a location and refining many gardeners’ competing visions into a plan certain to attract as many visitors as butterflies. Well before its first birthday and just a third of its eventual size, it’s hitting the mark. As Bass and I chatted, a young couple strolled past. Something in the way they moved tipped me off. “I think they’re sizing this up for a wedding,” I murmured. “Oh, absolutely,” Bass whispered back. “I figured them for that immediately. We’ve already had two weddings. I’d like to see musical performances, Shakespeare in the garden—the possibilities are limitless.” We were at the exit gate, but I didn’t want to leave. I wanted to keep wandering until the green tips of grape hyacinth poked through the cold soil. I wanted to see the peach trees bathed in blooms. I wanted to hear the buzz of bees. Apparently, I’m not alone. “In one year, we’ve gone from 600 members to 1,500,” Bass said. His count was shy by one. On the way out, I picked up a membership form, determined to make this the new garden of my dreams. ✜ Kate Nelson, an award-winning journalist and author of the biography Helen Hardin: A Straight Line Curved , lends volunteer labor to the native-plants garden and labyrinth at the Placitas Community Library.","publish_start_moment":"2014-03-28T11:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.473Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f966","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","title":"On the O’Keeffe Trail","slug":"horseback-riding-85354","image_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4dc","publish_start":"2014-03-24T14:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","58f5533b46da1c146c0fc752","58b4b2404c2774661570f274"],"tags_ids":["59090e46e1efff4c9916fb37","59090ce8e1efff4c9916fa49","59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20","59090c2de1efff4c9916f9d2"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"Charles C. Poling","custom_tagline":"Riding horseback just might be the best way to see Ghost Ranch.","created":"2014-03-24T14:36:05.000Z","legacy_id":"85354","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"on the o’keeffe trail","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.660Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

My horse—a big-boned, bombproof Norwegian fjord named Pooh—picked his way neatly down the sandy trail into the arroyo, gathered himself, and powered up the other side. Ahead, our trail string’s guide, Robb Carter, reined in his horse and turned in the saddle as the others caught up at our fourth stop on the two-hour Georgia O’Keeffe Trail Ride and Tour.

\r\n\r\n

The painter’s low adobe home sat to our left. A high rampart of red, orange, yellow, and gray cliffs punctuated by isolated sandstone chimneys loomed on our right. “We’re in Georgia O’Keeffe’s backyard,” Robb said, a grin stretching his mustache wide. Ahead of me, Kathleen Redwing took a breath and said to her daughter, “This is it!” She grandly swept her hand toward the cliffs and dry red hills spread around us.

\r\n\r\n

I was riding with Robb, his assistant wrangler, Rachel Perry, and three women named Kate. The mother-daughter duo Kathleen, from Toronto, and Kate, who lives in Aspen, were big O’Keeffe fans who came to Ghost Ranch specifically to immerse themselves in the landscapes she painted. They’d never been to New Mexico before, and the visual delights of the ranch’s painted desert were making a big impression.

\r\n\r\n

Horses make the perfect means of transport here, not just for the working-ranch atmospherics but because they carry you at just the right speed to soak in the grandeur. They watch where they’re going, while you watch the scenery.

\r\n\r\n

We stopped a moment. I stretched my feet out of the stirrups and rubbed Pooh’s burly neck. He’d have liked to snack on the blue grama grass, lush and green as Ireland—well, almost—from recent rains.

\r\n\r\n

Turning to Kate and Kathleen, who radiated as much pleasure about the horses as the landscape, I asked if Ghost Ranch met their expectations.

\r\n\r\n

“Oh, it’s spectacular!” daughter Kate said. “Being out in the elements like this, it’s even more than I expected.”

\r\n\r\n

“The sky is so blue,” Kathleen chimed in. “You could never anticipate this beauty.” She paused a moment and turned her thoughts back to O’Keeffe: “She was a brave woman in every aspect of her life.”

\r\n\r\n

Ghost Ranch outdoor education coordinator Robb guides riders of all abilities— nobody seems to call them dudes anymore—single file along the meandering trails crisscrossing the ranch’s “home” pasture. He had met us at the airy barn, where we gathered for a brief orientation. Rachel leafed through a book, showing us paintings of locations we’d soon see. Then she and Robb gave basic instruction in handling our fjords or quarter horses, slipped their bridles on, fitted helmets to each of us, helped everyone mount, and led us out the gate. The horses swung their haunches down into a deep arroyo, which we followed briefly before climbing out and half-circling around the base of the ranch’s signature Chimney Rock.

\r\n\r\n

In comfortable—and secure—western saddles, we ambled up and down red hills and wove among the juniper, cholla, four-wing saltbush, and bunchgrass. First we paused to admire the barren mounds that O’Keeffe painted as Cedar Tree with Lavender Hills. The horses stood quietly as we gazed on the scene and recalled the painting Robb had showed us from Georgia O’Keeffe and New Mexico: A Sense of Place before the ride. (Disclosure: My sister, Lesley Poling-Kempes, is coauthor.) Sure enough, there was the hill and the very tree, preserved nearly 80 years later by the arid climate. In another spot, we relaxed in our saddles while Robb explained how O’Keeffe lay down here to paint.

\r\n\r\n

To hardcore O’Keeffe fans, this is the Sistine Chapel.

\r\n\r\n

The painter kept a house on Ghost Ranch for 40-some years. From 1955 on, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) owned the 22,000-acre ranch, running it as an adult study center, letting locals graze cows on the pastures, and guarding the artist’s privacy. O’Keeffe would wander the red, yellow, and purple hills under the magnificent cliffs, picking up stray animal bones and skulls, contemplating her favorite mountain, Pedernal, on the southern horizon, and setting up her easel to paint.

\r\n\r\n

Here she conjured the sublime Ladder to the Moon, the cheerfully haunting Deer’s Skull with Pedernal, and the nearly abstracted full-frame Red and Yellow Cliffs.

\r\n\r\n

I find these and her other ranch paintings the most satisfying of her work, not just because Ghost Ranch is my own favorite place, but because O’Keeffe captured its emotional impact while reimagining the dramatic landscape in spiritually charged, sensually rendered forms. It’s the place, and it’s the place idealized.

\r\n\r\n

And it’s an ideal place for a trail ride.

\r\n\r\n

Trail-Ride Roundup
\r\nTrail-riding outfits around New Mexico offer forays into a wide variety of terrain. Here’s a selection of experienced wranglers who can have you saddled up and on the trail in no time.

\r\n\r\n
\"Guide\"The Brazos Cliffs loom over the trail at Fishtail Ranch in Chama.
\r\n\r\n

ANGEL FIRE
\r\nRoadrunner Tours Owner Nancy Burch takes up to 25 riders at a time into the Carson National Forest of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains for outings from one hour to all day. She also offers breakfast and dinner rides and gold-panning adventures. There’s no weight limit for riders, children are welcome, and all ability levels are accommodated. Open daily year-round, but call for availability. Rates: $45 for one hour, $75 for two hours, $95 for three hours, and $180 for all day; call for pricing on specialty rides. Elk Horn Lodge, 3377 Mountain View Blvd.; (575) 377-6416; rtours.com

\r\n\r\n

CERRILLOS
\r\nBroken Saddle Riding Company Harrold Grantham’s smooth-gaited Tennessee walking horses and Missouri fox trotters take riders to three scenic overlooks in the Cerrillos Hills State Park, south of Santa Fe. Weight limit of 225 pounds, must be age eight or above, and all ability levels accommodated. Open every day including Christmas. Rates: From $60 for 1 1/4 hours to $110 for three hours. 26 County Road 59A; (505) 424-7774; brokensaddle.com

\r\n\r\n

CHAMA
\r\nFishtail Ranch Cool mountain air, tall pines, a rushing river, and gorgeous views of the stunning Brazos Cliffs await up to 30 riders at a time. Wranglers start you in the round pen on a registered quarter horse, then you head for the hills on 1,000 acres of private land, starting at 8,000 feet. Weight limit of 250 pounds, must be at least 10, all ability levels accommodated. Open Memorial Day to Labor Day, 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Rate: $50. Approximately nine miles south of Chama on U.S. 84; (575) 588-7884; leeweiss@fishtailranch.com; fishtailranch.com/TrailRides.html

\r\n\r\n

LAS CRUCES
\r\nCorralitos Ranch Sprawled over 290 square miles of wide-open country, this ranch offers groups of two to six riders the chance to explore prehistoric caves, historic mines, and even dinosaur tracks. Weight limit of 250 pounds, all ability levels accommodated, must be older than seven. Open daily year-round. Rate: $20 per hour. 16 miles west of Las Cruces. Call to make an appointment and get directions. (575) 640-8184; corralitostrailrides.com

\r\n\r\n

RUIDOSO
\r\nGrindstone Stables Guided one-hour rides for the whole family wind past Grindstone Lake and then climb to the top of Townsend Ridge. All ages and children older than five can ride solo. Open seven days a week, Memorial Day to Labor Day, weekends and holidays thereafter; call first, but walk-ins welcome. Rate: $30. 523 Resort Drive; (575) 257-2241; grindstonestables.com

","teaser_raw":"

My horse—a big-boned, bombproof Norwegian fjord named Pooh—picked his way neatly down the sandy trail into the arroyo, gathered himself, and powered up the other side. Ahead, our trail string’s guide,

","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725e05","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","name":"Charles C. Poling","image_id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.238Z","blog":"magazine","_name_sort":"charles c. poling","updated":"2017-04-07T19:23:02.520Z","image":{"_id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","original_public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a","title":"Charles Poling","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a","version":1491592948,"signature":"a1e9de47ffcf2af2552c8ef4d964d757d7127df1","width":3057,"height":3057,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-04-07T19:22:28.000Z","bytes":819746,"type":"upload","etag":"51266d9e3fdd066a649893da5ac973f6","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1491592948/clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1491592948/clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a.jpg","original_filename":"file"},"alt_text_raw":"Charles Poling","credits":"Charles Poling","content_owner":"magazine","title_sort":"charles poling","updated":"2017-04-07T19:22:38.125Z","deleted":false,"created":"2017-04-07T19:22:38.126Z","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/CPheadshot_25c9db63-defd-468a-81c4-cb4941e5dd2a"}},"id":"58e7e6fe478ef02e53f5f3bc","type":"image","inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Charles Poling"},"_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8","title":"Charles C. Poling","slug":"charles-c-poling","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/charles-c-poling/58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/charles-c-poling/58b4b2404c2774661570f1a8/#comments","totalPosts":16},"categories":[{"_id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","title":"Travel","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"travel","updated":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.155Z","created":"2017-03-14T18:21:37.156Z","_totalPosts":188,"id":"58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a","slug":"travel","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/travel/58c834b11f16f9392cf0992a/#comments","totalPosts":188},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","blog":"magazine","title":"Going Places","_title_sort":"going places","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.493Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.506Z","_totalPosts":78,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4","slug":"going-places","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/going-places/58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/going-places/58b4b2404c2774661570f2b4/#comments","totalPosts":78},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","blog":"magazine","title":"April 2014","_title_sort":"april 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.491Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.498Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","slug":"april-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/#comments","totalPosts":16}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4dc","legacy_id":"85355","title":"Main","created":"2014-03-24T14:38:46.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:08.418Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"main","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/main_01d06378-0607-45e9-a4bf-342c1a1f8cf8","version":1488237128,"signature":"64c187b85a1069311005d5591c0956b89dfadf9a","width":500,"height":462,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:08.000Z","bytes":77566,"type":"upload","etag":"bc6b4d33ff4bc6ab61b4d9d8b735e1ed","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237128/clients/newmexico/main_01d06378-0607-45e9-a4bf-342c1a1f8cf8.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237128/clients/newmexico/main_01d06378-0607-45e9-a4bf-342c1a1f8cf8.jpg","original_filename":"main"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4dc","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/main_01d06378-0607-45e9-a4bf-342c1a1f8cf8"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"Main"},"tags":[{"_id":"59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20","title":"Events","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"events","updated":"2017-05-02T22:48:09.170Z","created":"2017-05-02T22:48:09.171Z","_totalPosts":62,"id":"59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20","slug":"events","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/tag/events/59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/tag/events/59090ca9e1efff4c9916fa20/#comments","totalPosts":62}],"teaser":"

My horse—a big-boned, bombproof Norwegian fjord named Pooh—picked his way neatly down the sandy trail into the arroyo, gathered himself, and powered up the other side. Ahead, our trail string’s guide,

","description":"My horse—a big-boned, bombproof Norwegian fjord named Pooh—picked his way neatly down the sandy trail into the arroyo, gathered himself, and powered up the other side. Ahead, our trail string’s guide, Robb Carter, reined in his horse and turned in the saddle as the others caught up at our fourth stop on the two-hour Georgia O’Keeffe Trail Ride and Tour. The painter’s low adobe home sat to our left. A high rampart of red, orange, yellow, and gray cliffs punctuated by isolated sandstone chimneys loomed on our right. “We’re in Georgia O’Keeffe’s backyard,” Robb said, a grin stretching his mustache wide. Ahead of me, Kathleen Redwing took a breath and said to her daughter, “This is it!” She grandly swept her hand toward the cliffs and dry red hills spread around us. I was riding with Robb, his assistant wrangler, Rachel Perry, and three women named Kate. The mother-daughter duo Kathleen, from Toronto, and Kate, who lives in Aspen, were big O’Keeffe fans who came to Ghost Ranch specifically to immerse themselves in the landscapes she painted. They’d never been to New Mexico before, and the visual delights of the ranch’s painted desert were making a big impression. Horses make the perfect means of transport here, not just for the working-ranch atmospherics but because they carry you at just the right speed to soak in the grandeur. They watch where they’re going, while you watch the scenery. We stopped a moment. I stretched my feet out of the stirrups and rubbed Pooh’s burly neck. He’d have liked to snack on the blue grama grass, lush and green as Ireland—well, almost—from recent rains. Turning to Kate and Kathleen, who radiated as much pleasure about the horses as the landscape, I asked if Ghost Ranch met their expectations. “Oh, it’s spectacular!” daughter Kate said. “Being out in the elements like this, it’s even more than I expected.” “The sky is so blue,” Kathleen chimed in. “You could never anticipate this beauty.” She paused a moment and turned her thoughts back to O’Keeffe: “She was a brave woman in every aspect of her life.” Ghost Ranch outdoor education coordinator Robb guides riders of all abilities— nobody seems to call them dudes anymore—single file along the meandering trails crisscrossing the ranch’s “home” pasture. He had met us at the airy barn, where we gathered for a brief orientation. Rachel leafed through a book, showing us paintings of locations we’d soon see. Then she and Robb gave basic instruction in handling our fjords or quarter horses, slipped their bridles on, fitted helmets to each of us, helped everyone mount, and led us out the gate. The horses swung their haunches down into a deep arroyo, which we followed briefly before climbing out and half-circling around the base of the ranch’s signature Chimney Rock. In comfortable—and secure—western saddles, we ambled up and down red hills and wove among the juniper, cholla, four-wing saltbush, and bunchgrass. First we paused to admire the barren mounds that O’Keeffe painted as Cedar Tree with Lavender Hills. The horses stood quietly as we gazed on the scene and recalled the painting Robb had showed us from Georgia O’Keeffe and New Mexico: A Sense of Place before the ride. (Disclosure: My sister, Lesley Poling-Kempes, is coauthor.) Sure enough, there was the hill and the very tree, preserved nearly 80 years later by the arid climate. In another spot, we relaxed in our saddles while Robb explained how O’Keeffe lay down here to paint. To hardcore O’Keeffe fans, this is the Sistine Chapel. The painter kept a house on Ghost Ranch for 40-some years. From 1955 on, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) owned the 22,000-acre ranch, running it as an adult study center, letting locals graze cows on the pastures, and guarding the artist’s privacy. O’Keeffe would wander the red, yellow, and purple hills under the magnificent cliffs, picking up stray animal bones and skulls, contemplating her favorite mountain, Pedernal, on the southern horizon, and setting up her easel to paint. Here she conjured the sublime Ladder to the Moon, the cheerfully haunting Deer’s Skull with Pedernal, and the nearly abstracted full-frame Red and Yellow Cliffs. I find these and her other ranch paintings the most satisfying of her work, not just because Ghost Ranch is my own favorite place, but because O’Keeffe captured its emotional impact while reimagining the dramatic landscape in spiritually charged, sensually rendered forms. It’s the place, and it’s the place idealized. And it’s an ideal place for a trail ride. Trail-Ride Roundup Trail-riding outfits around New Mexico offer forays into a wide variety of terrain. Here’s a selection of experienced wranglers who can have you saddled up and on the trail in no time. The Brazos Cliffs loom over the trail at Fishtail Ranch in Chama. ANGEL FIRE Roadrunner Tours Owner Nancy Burch takes up to 25 riders at a time into the Carson National Forest of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains for outings from one hour to all day. She also offers breakfast and dinner rides and gold-panning adventures. There’s no weight limit for riders, children are welcome, and all ability levels are accommodated. Open daily year-round, but call for availability. Rates: $45 for one hour, $75 for two hours, $95 for three hours, and $180 for all day; call for pricing on specialty rides. Elk Horn Lodge, 3377 Mountain View Blvd.; (575) 377-6416; rtours.com CERRILLOS Broken Saddle Riding Company Harrold Grantham’s smooth-gaited Tennessee walking horses and Missouri fox trotters take riders to three scenic overlooks in the Cerrillos Hills State Park, south of Santa Fe. Weight limit of 225 pounds, must be age eight or above, and all ability levels accommodated. Open every day including Christmas. Rates: From $60 for 1 1/4 hours to $110 for three hours. 26 County Road 59A; (505) 424-7774; brokensaddle.com CHAMA Fishtail Ranch Cool mountain air, tall pines, a rushing river, and gorgeous views of the stunning Brazos Cliffs await up to 30 riders at a time. Wranglers start you in the round pen on a registered quarter horse, then you head for the hills on 1,000 acres of private land, starting at 8,000 feet. Weight limit of 250 pounds, must be at least 10, all ability levels accommodated. Open Memorial Day to Labor Day, 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Rate: $50. Approximately nine miles south of Chama on U.S. 84; (575) 588-7884; leeweiss@fishtailranch.com ; fishtailranch.com/TrailRides.html LAS CRUCES Corralitos Ranch Sprawled over 290 square miles of wide-open country, this ranch offers groups of two to six riders the chance to explore prehistoric caves, historic mines, and even dinosaur tracks. Weight limit of 250 pounds, all ability levels accommodated, must be older than seven. Open daily year-round. Rate: $20 per hour. 16 miles west of Las Cruces. Call to make an appointment and get directions. (575) 640-8184; corralitostrailrides.com RUIDOSO Grindstone Stables Guided one-hour rides for the whole family wind past Grindstone Lake and then climb to the top of Townsend Ridge. All ages and children older than five can ride solo. Open seven days a week, Memorial Day to Labor Day, weekends and holidays thereafter; call first, but walk-ins welcome. Rate: $30. 523 Resort Drive; (575) 257-2241; grindstonestables.com ✜","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f966","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/horseback-riding-85354/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/horseback-riding-85354/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/horseback-riding-85354/","metaTitle":"On the O’Keeffe Trail","metaDescription":"

My horse—a big-boned, bombproof Norwegian fjord named Pooh—picked his way neatly down the sandy trail into the arroyo, gathered himself, and powered up the other side. Ahead, our trail string’s guide,

","cleanDescription":"My horse—a big-boned, bombproof Norwegian fjord named Pooh—picked his way neatly down the sandy trail into the arroyo, gathered himself, and powered up the other side. Ahead, our trail string’s guide, Robb Carter, reined in his horse and turned in the saddle as the others caught up at our fourth stop on the two-hour Georgia O’Keeffe Trail Ride and Tour. The painter’s low adobe home sat to our left. A high rampart of red, orange, yellow, and gray cliffs punctuated by isolated sandstone chimneys loomed on our right. “We’re in Georgia O’Keeffe’s backyard,” Robb said, a grin stretching his mustache wide. Ahead of me, Kathleen Redwing took a breath and said to her daughter, “This is it!” She grandly swept her hand toward the cliffs and dry red hills spread around us. I was riding with Robb, his assistant wrangler, Rachel Perry, and three women named Kate. The mother-daughter duo Kathleen, from Toronto, and Kate, who lives in Aspen, were big O’Keeffe fans who came to Ghost Ranch specifically to immerse themselves in the landscapes she painted. They’d never been to New Mexico before, and the visual delights of the ranch’s painted desert were making a big impression. Horses make the perfect means of transport here, not just for the working-ranch atmospherics but because they carry you at just the right speed to soak in the grandeur. They watch where they’re going, while you watch the scenery. We stopped a moment. I stretched my feet out of the stirrups and rubbed Pooh’s burly neck. He’d have liked to snack on the blue grama grass, lush and green as Ireland—well, almost—from recent rains. Turning to Kate and Kathleen, who radiated as much pleasure about the horses as the landscape, I asked if Ghost Ranch met their expectations. “Oh, it’s spectacular!” daughter Kate said. “Being out in the elements like this, it’s even more than I expected.” “The sky is so blue,” Kathleen chimed in. “You could never anticipate this beauty.” She paused a moment and turned her thoughts back to O’Keeffe: “She was a brave woman in every aspect of her life.” Ghost Ranch outdoor education coordinator Robb guides riders of all abilities— nobody seems to call them dudes anymore—single file along the meandering trails crisscrossing the ranch’s “home” pasture. He had met us at the airy barn, where we gathered for a brief orientation. Rachel leafed through a book, showing us paintings of locations we’d soon see. Then she and Robb gave basic instruction in handling our fjords or quarter horses, slipped their bridles on, fitted helmets to each of us, helped everyone mount, and led us out the gate. The horses swung their haunches down into a deep arroyo, which we followed briefly before climbing out and half-circling around the base of the ranch’s signature Chimney Rock. In comfortable—and secure—western saddles, we ambled up and down red hills and wove among the juniper, cholla, four-wing saltbush, and bunchgrass. First we paused to admire the barren mounds that O’Keeffe painted as Cedar Tree with Lavender Hills. The horses stood quietly as we gazed on the scene and recalled the painting Robb had showed us from Georgia O’Keeffe and New Mexico: A Sense of Place before the ride. (Disclosure: My sister, Lesley Poling-Kempes, is coauthor.) Sure enough, there was the hill and the very tree, preserved nearly 80 years later by the arid climate. In another spot, we relaxed in our saddles while Robb explained how O’Keeffe lay down here to paint. To hardcore O’Keeffe fans, this is the Sistine Chapel. The painter kept a house on Ghost Ranch for 40-some years. From 1955 on, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) owned the 22,000-acre ranch, running it as an adult study center, letting locals graze cows on the pastures, and guarding the artist’s privacy. O’Keeffe would wander the red, yellow, and purple hills under the magnificent cliffs, picking up stray animal bones and skulls, contemplating her favorite mountain, Pedernal, on the southern horizon, and setting up her easel to paint. Here she conjured the sublime Ladder to the Moon, the cheerfully haunting Deer’s Skull with Pedernal, and the nearly abstracted full-frame Red and Yellow Cliffs. I find these and her other ranch paintings the most satisfying of her work, not just because Ghost Ranch is my own favorite place, but because O’Keeffe captured its emotional impact while reimagining the dramatic landscape in spiritually charged, sensually rendered forms. It’s the place, and it’s the place idealized. And it’s an ideal place for a trail ride. Trail-Ride Roundup Trail-riding outfits around New Mexico offer forays into a wide variety of terrain. Here’s a selection of experienced wranglers who can have you saddled up and on the trail in no time. The Brazos Cliffs loom over the trail at Fishtail Ranch in Chama. ANGEL FIRE Roadrunner Tours Owner Nancy Burch takes up to 25 riders at a time into the Carson National Forest of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains for outings from one hour to all day. She also offers breakfast and dinner rides and gold-panning adventures. There’s no weight limit for riders, children are welcome, and all ability levels are accommodated. Open daily year-round, but call for availability. Rates: $45 for one hour, $75 for two hours, $95 for three hours, and $180 for all day; call for pricing on specialty rides. Elk Horn Lodge, 3377 Mountain View Blvd.; (575) 377-6416; rtours.com CERRILLOS Broken Saddle Riding Company Harrold Grantham’s smooth-gaited Tennessee walking horses and Missouri fox trotters take riders to three scenic overlooks in the Cerrillos Hills State Park, south of Santa Fe. Weight limit of 225 pounds, must be age eight or above, and all ability levels accommodated. Open every day including Christmas. Rates: From $60 for 1 1/4 hours to $110 for three hours. 26 County Road 59A; (505) 424-7774; brokensaddle.com CHAMA Fishtail Ranch Cool mountain air, tall pines, a rushing river, and gorgeous views of the stunning Brazos Cliffs await up to 30 riders at a time. Wranglers start you in the round pen on a registered quarter horse, then you head for the hills on 1,000 acres of private land, starting at 8,000 feet. Weight limit of 250 pounds, must be at least 10, all ability levels accommodated. Open Memorial Day to Labor Day, 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Rate: $50. Approximately nine miles south of Chama on U.S. 84; (575) 588-7884; leeweiss@fishtailranch.com ; fishtailranch.com/TrailRides.html LAS CRUCES Corralitos Ranch Sprawled over 290 square miles of wide-open country, this ranch offers groups of two to six riders the chance to explore prehistoric caves, historic mines, and even dinosaur tracks. Weight limit of 250 pounds, all ability levels accommodated, must be older than seven. Open daily year-round. Rate: $20 per hour. 16 miles west of Las Cruces. Call to make an appointment and get directions. (575) 640-8184; corralitostrailrides.com RUIDOSO Grindstone Stables Guided one-hour rides for the whole family wind past Grindstone Lake and then climb to the top of Townsend Ridge. All ages and children older than five can ride solo. Open seven days a week, Memorial Day to Labor Day, weekends and holidays thereafter; call first, but walk-ins welcome. Rate: $30. 523 Resort Drive; (575) 257-2241; grindstonestables.com ✜","publish_start_moment":"2014-03-24T14:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.473Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f965","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1ad","title":"Food for the Soul","slug":"tasting-nm-85307","publish_start":"2014-03-21T14:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f32a","58c83a3d1f16f9392cf09ac4","58b4b2404c2774661570f274"],"tags_ids":["59090e3ce1efff4c9916fb32","59090c7ae1efff4c9916fa01","59090c2de1efff4c9916f9d2"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"Kate Russell, Douglas Merriam, and Amiel Gervers","custom_tagline":"Three classic red-and-green restaurants that always remain fresh.","created":"2014-03-21T14:48:00.000Z","legacy_id":"85307","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"food for the soul","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.921Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

\r\n\r\n

 

\r\n\r\n

In the restaurant world, “new” always grabs headlines. Vintage dining establishments, though, can build on their classic character, day after day, decade upon decade, and show the arrivistes that aged doesn’t mean outmoded. La Posta de Mesilla (near Las Cruces), El Pinto (in Albuquerque’s North Valley), and Rancho de Chimayó (north of Santa Fe) are so well known and beloved that the owners of any one of them could have kicked back and continued to watch guests trail through the doors for decades to come. But all of them have invested heavily in the beauty of their surroundings, in the importance of their homegrown staffs, and in their support of local suppliers. All serve New Mexican cuisine in its red and green glory, staying true to tradition while continuing to upgrade the quality of their ingredients. These venerable culinary landmarks, with a total of 175 deeply rooted years in the restaurant business, are honored with places on the New Mexico Tourism Department’s Culinary Treasures Trail (mynm.us/nmculinary).

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La Posta de Mesilla

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Exuberance abounds here, on the plate as well as in the surroundings. It starts when you enter the lobby, flourishing with tropical foliage, aquariums, some lively parrots, and a toucan named Tiki.

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In preparation for this year’s 75th anniversary year, owners Jerean Camuñez Hutchinson (the founder’s great-niece) and her husband, Tom, have expanded into a half-dozen new spaces within the storied original adobe structure. The building dates to the earliest days of Mesilla, when settlers began moving there after the conclusion of the war with Mexico in 1848. Now on the National Register of Historic Places, it served as an important stop of the Butterfield Stage Line and later the distinguished Corn Exchange Hotel. La Posta’s legend started in 1939, when 19-year-old Katy Griggs Camuñez Meek announced to her family that she was going to open a restaurant. That she knew nothing about the business, or any business, was no hindrance to can-do Katy. She bought a corner of the rambling adobe (now the Banquet Room) from her uncle for $1 and convinced her mother to cook the family recipes for a fourtable “chile joint” with no running water. It became a smashing success. Katy was an absolute charmer, an ebullient hostess and waitress who welcomed everyone. She delighted in making risqué quips that Jerean says could make a salty old sailor blush.

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The Hutchinsons’ newly remodeled rooms include Katy’s Blue Room. Once the founder’s bedroom, it may be my new favorite among the dining spaces. The original wood floor remains in place, as uneven as ever and a charming contrast to the lapis walls. Nearby, the Fiesta Room was once a part of the historic Fountain Theatre, which still operates next door. Everything about the room exclaims antiquity—the hefty hand-carved wooden doors, the two-footthick adobe walls, the 700-pound vigas that span the ceiling. The Corn Exchange Cantina holds what was Katy’s favorite table; her portrait now hangs there. The intricate stained-glass window behind the bar shows a stagecoach descending from the Organ Mountains into Mesilla. As if these and the other festive dining rooms don’t give guests enough seating options, there’s now the additional opportunity to eat outdoors in an enclosed patio under the shade of a pecan tree.

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Jerean smiles as she talks about the new Adobe Cantina y Tequileria, a central gathering spot. She opts for the “La Patrona” margarita, with 100 percent blue agave Patrón Añejo tequila, Cointreau, and freshly squeezed lime juice, but the options are pretty much unlimited. For those who prefer their libation straight, Herradura now makes a special-reserve La Posta tequila, served here from the barrel.

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Since the beginning, one of the restaurant’s most popular dishes has been Katy’s original tostadas compuestas. I love these cupped corn tortillas overflowing with frijoles, red chile con carne, and bright garnishes. Among the green chile dishes, always made with Mesilla Valley peppers, locals opt most often for the sour cream enchiladas. Jerean and Tom have added shrimp ceviche, fajitas, and serious charbroiled steaks to the menu more recently. La Posta now serves breakfast on weekends. Jerean emphasizes that they purchase many of their products locally. “The honey we serve with our sopaipillas comes from local bees, so you’re tasting the flowers of the Mesilla Valley.” Sweet indeed.

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2410 Calle de San Albino, Mesilla; (575) 524-3524; laposta-de-mesilla.com

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El Pinto

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A gracious adobe hacienda, dating to the 1960s, El Pinto was created on this Albuquerque North Valley site by Jack and Consuelo (Connie) Thomas. Connie is related to the Griggs branch of the La Posta de Mesilla family, through her grandmother Josephina Chavez-Griggs. Now in its 52nd year, El Pinto was really way outside of town when the Thomases launched a one-room café on the 12-acre property (it’s off the Tramway exit). Twin brothers Jim and John Thomas grew up here from the time they were toddlers, and took the reins from their parents in 1989. They created a garden room that brings the outside in, but when the weather’s right, five patios offer striking settings, and lots of wide views of the Sandías.

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Jim Thomas claims that his family was the first to differentiate the state’s red-andgreen- chile specialties as “New Mexican” rather than Mexican. “My mother’s grandmother was a Mexican citizen, and she insisted there was nothing Mexican about the local fare. She was right. To this day, we avoid dishes that come from elsewhere, like Tex-Mex fajitas.” El Pinto’s bestsellers are the traditional chicken enchiladas, made with antibiotic- and hormone-free poultry, and the #3 combination plate, with rolled enchilada (Jim has his red, beef, and hot), rolled taco, chile relleno, pork chile con carne, and Colorado pintos. Both the red and green chile are grown pesticide- and herbicide-free near Hatch.

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This past summer, the twins began growing heirloom tomatoes for salads and salsa, and a greenhouse is under construction so they can grow greens and some vegetables year-round. They send their food scraps to a vermiculture (worm) farm, which then returns the rich worm castings to the restaurant for the garden soil. Jim tells me that they are now sourcing non-GMO corn for their chips and tortillas. Finding unmodified corn has become increasingly an issue here in the United States, so El Pinto’s corn now comes from Mexico.

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Horno pig roasts, monthly spring through fall, have become a new tradition. Roasts are planned for Easter, Memorial Day, and the Fourth of July, in particular. The hogs come from Kyzer Farms, on the southern edge of Albuquerque.

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El Pinto’s bar currently offers New Mexico’s largest selection of tequila, some 168 different choices. Guests can opt for a handmade margarita, a flight of three tequilas with a traditional southof- the-border chaser of citrusy sangrita (a blend of citrus, chile, and tomato, the traditional accompaniment sipped alongside straight tequila in Mexico), or a shot or snifter of super-premium tequila. A big salud to the Thomas twins.

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10500 4th Street NW, Albuquerque; (505) 898-1771; elpinto.com

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Rancho de Chimayó

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Turning 50 in 2015, Rancho de Chimayó ranks as the youngster in this collection of culinary landmarks. However, what’s astonishing here is that founder Florence Jaramillo continues to helm the restaurant, as she has since day one. Actually, it’s not so astonishing if you’ve ever met the energetic Florence, known to virtually everyone as Mrs. J. Equally noteworthy is that Florence, with her then husband Arturo, created the restaurant in Arturo’s ancestral family home, to help preserve the local culture and way of life they saw was becoming endangered in the 1960s.

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When a fire nearly destroyed the rustic but genteel hacienda in 2008, Florence determined immediately that she and the staff would bring the restaurant back to life. The village’s economic and cultural life were too intertwined with the landmark to do anything else. Hundreds of area residents helped with various tasks, including the mud replastering of the exterior. It took nearly two years. The kitchen was revamped completely, but everything else was restored to its former historic appearance. When the Rancho reopened, the food was perhaps even better than it had been previously.

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It’s been a personal honor for me to have worked with Mrs. J. and her daughter Laura on the restaurant’s original cookbook, The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: The Traditional Cooking of New Mexico, published back in 1991, and again on a brandnew book, the 50th anniversary edition, which will be released in June. It includes Chimayó classics like the signature carne adovada, made with genuine Chimayó red pods, of course. The book also includes a number of new recipes, especially breakfast dishes, now that the restaurant serves the morning meal on weekends. Mrs. J. says, “New Mexico Magazine’s early coverage of the restaurant helped us get our start.” And she’d love for the magazine’s readers to come to the kickoff party celebrating the new Rancho de Chimayó cookbook, and the restaurant’s 50th anniversary events, on Saturday afternoon, June 21. Check the restaurant’s website for the specific time and details.

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300 Juan Medina Road, Chimayó; (505) 351-4444; ranchodechimayo.com

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Recipes

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\"Pancake\"
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These recipes are from the upcoming The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition, by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison (© 2014, Lyons Press, an imprint of Globe Pequot Press). The three can make the basis for an Easter breakfast or brunch with a platter of fruit and a festive beverage. Try the pancakes for supper, the tortas for lunch, or the bread pudding (online at mynm.us/414recipe) as a dessert with any meal.

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Blue Corn Pancakes

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Along with the especially nutty blue cornmeal itself, the generous amount of vanilla extract is the secret to Rancho de Chimayó’s tender raised cakes. The restaurant staff makes plate-size pancakes, but you may prefer to make smaller ones.

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Serves 4

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    \r\n\t
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons blue cornmeal, preferably, or other cornmeal
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  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
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  • 2 tablespoons sugar
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  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
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  • Pinch of salt
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  • 2 large eggs
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  • ¾ cup half-and-half
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  • ¾ cup milk
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  • 3 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
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  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
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\r\nCanola or vegetable oil for frying Butter and warm maple syrup

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Stir together in a large bowl the cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.

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Whisk in eggs, half-and-half, milk, oil, and vanilla. Let batter sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Alternatively, cover batter and refrigerate it overnight.

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Warm a griddle, preferably, or a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Pour a thin film of oil on griddle. Pour or spoon out batter onto hot griddle, where it should sizzle and hiss. A generous 3 tablespoons of batter will make a 4- to 5-inch pancake. Make as many cakes as you can fit on the surface without crowding.

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Flip pancakes just once, after 1 to 2 minutes, when their top surface is covered with tiny bubbles but before all bubbles pop. Pancakes are done when second side is golden brown, an additional 1 to 2 minutes. Repeat with remaining batter, adding a bit more oil to griddle as needed.

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Serve pancakes immediately, accompanied by butter and syrup. The pancakes absorb more of both toppings than cakes made with regular flour, so plan on being generous with their use.

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Tortas de Huevos Tradicionales (Egg Patties)

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\"Tortas\"
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\r\nAhead-of-time note:
Up to an hour ahead, the egg whites and yolks can be prepared to the point just before they are combined. Keep both bowls chilled until ready to use.

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High-altitude note: At 6,500 to 7,000 feet, the batter will rise more easily, so less leavening is needed. Use just a pinch of baking powder and fry between 360˚F and 365˚F. At altitudes between 2,500 and 6,500 feet, adjust the baking powder and temperature accordingly.

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Don’t let the lack of familiarity or the simplicity of this dish cause you to pass it by. Also, don’t confuse it with Mexican tortas, which are typically sandwiches. These light, crispy egg fritters are a Jaramillo family favorite. Steeped in tradition, the tortas are common in northern New Mexico households during Lent, when meat is avoided. The tortas also appear on Easter menus because of eggs’ association with new life.

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Serves 2 to 3 as a main dish, 4 to 5 as a side dish

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  • 3 large eggs
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  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
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  • Scant ¼ teaspoon baking powder
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  • Pinch of salt or more to taste
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  • Canola or vegetable oil for frying, to a depth of 1 inch
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  • 2 to 3 cups Red Chile Sauce (recipe at mynm.us/414recipe)
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\r\nSeparate eggs, dropping whites into a medium-size non-plastic mixing bowl and placing yolks in a small bowl. Mix yolks lightly with a fork or whisk. Stir in flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside. Beat egg whites with a mixer at high speed until stiff. Gently fold egg yolk mixture into egg whites.

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Lay several thicknesses of paper towels near the stove. In a heavy skillet, heat oil to 375˚ F. Scoop up a large spoonful of the batter and drop it gently into oil. Within seconds it should puff up by 50 percent or more into a torta or patty. Turn patty at least once to cook evenly and fry until deep golden brown. It will be fragile but crisp. Remove first torta with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. Cut into patty to see if it is cooked through but has a melting tenderness. The interior should not be dry. Adjust oil temperature if necessary.

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Drop in remaining batter, several large spoonfuls at a time. Don’t crowd tortas as they cook. Repeat until all batter is used. Transfer tortas to a platter or plates and surround with chile sauce. Serve immediately.

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Cheryl Alters Jamison is New Mexico Magazine’s contributing culinary editor. Read her blog at nmmagazine.com/tastingnm. See more of Douglas Merriam‘s work at douglasmerriam.com. Preorder The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition from the New Mexico Magazine Store (books ship in late April) at shopnm.co/ChimayoCookbook.

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In the restaurant world, “new” always grabs headlines. Vintage dining establishments, though, can build on their classic character, day after day, decade upon decade, and show the arrivistes that

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In the restaurant world, “new” always grabs headlines. Vintage dining establishments, though, can build on their classic character, day after day, decade upon decade, and show the arrivistes that

","description":"  In the restaurant world, “new” always grabs headlines. Vintage dining establishments, though, can build on their classic character, day after day, decade upon decade, and show the arrivistes that aged doesn’t mean outmoded. La Posta de Mesilla (near Las Cruces), El Pinto (in Albuquerque’s North Valley), and Rancho de Chimayó (north of Santa Fe) are so well known and beloved that the owners of any one of them could have kicked back and continued to watch guests trail through the doors for decades to come. But all of them have invested heavily in the beauty of their surroundings, in the importance of their homegrown staffs, and in their support of local suppliers. All serve New Mexican cuisine in its red and green glory, staying true to tradition while continuing to upgrade the quality of their ingredients. These venerable culinary landmarks, with a total of 175 deeply rooted years in the restaurant business, are honored with places on the New Mexico Tourism Department’s Culinary Treasures Trail ( mynm.us/nmculinary ). La Posta de Mesilla     Exuberance abounds here, on the plate as well as in the surroundings. It starts when you enter the lobby, flourishing with tropical foliage, aquariums, some lively parrots, and a toucan named Tiki.   In preparation for this year’s 75th anniversary year, owners Jerean Camuñez Hutchinson (the founder’s great-niece) and her husband, Tom, have expanded into a half-dozen new spaces within the storied original adobe structure. The building dates to the earliest days of Mesilla, when settlers began moving there after the conclusion of the war with Mexico in 1848. Now on the National Register of Historic Places, it served as an important stop of the Butterfield Stage Line and later the distinguished Corn Exchange Hotel. La Posta’s legend started in 1939, when 19-year-old Katy Griggs Camuñez Meek announced to her family that she was going to open a restaurant. That she knew nothing about the business, or any business, was no hindrance to can-do Katy. She bought a corner of the rambling adobe (now the Banquet Room) from her uncle for $1 and convinced her mother to cook the family recipes for a fourtable “chile joint” with no running water. It became a smashing success. Katy was an absolute charmer, an ebullient hostess and waitress who welcomed everyone. She delighted in making risqué quips that Jerean says could make a salty old sailor blush. The Hutchinsons’ newly remodeled rooms include Katy’s Blue Room. Once the founder’s bedroom, it may be my new favorite among the dining spaces. The original wood floor remains in place, as uneven as ever and a charming contrast to the lapis walls. Nearby, the Fiesta Room was once a part of the historic Fountain Theatre, which still operates next door. Everything about the room exclaims antiquity—the hefty hand-carved wooden doors, the two-footthick adobe walls, the 700-pound vigas that span the ceiling. The Corn Exchange Cantina holds what was Katy’s favorite table; her portrait now hangs there. The intricate stained-glass window behind the bar shows a stagecoach descending from the Organ Mountains into Mesilla. As if these and the other festive dining rooms don’t give guests enough seating options, there’s now the additional opportunity to eat outdoors in an enclosed patio under the shade of a pecan tree. Jerean smiles as she talks about the new Adobe Cantina y Tequileria, a central gathering spot. She opts for the “La Patrona” margarita, with 100 percent blue agave Patrón Añejo tequila, Cointreau, and freshly squeezed lime juice, but the options are pretty much unlimited. For those who prefer their libation straight, Herradura now makes a special-reserve La Posta tequila, served here from the barrel. Since the beginning, one of the restaurant’s most popular dishes has been Katy’s original tostadas compuestas. I love these cupped corn tortillas overflowing with frijoles, red chile con carne, and bright garnishes. Among the green chile dishes, always made with Mesilla Valley peppers, locals opt most often for the sour cream enchiladas. Jerean and Tom have added shrimp ceviche, fajitas, and serious charbroiled steaks to the menu more recently. La Posta now serves breakfast on weekends. Jerean emphasizes that they purchase many of their products locally. “The honey we serve with our sopaipillas comes from local bees, so you’re tasting the flowers of the Mesilla Valley.” Sweet indeed. 2410 Calle de San Albino, Mesilla; (575) 524-3524; laposta-de-mesilla.com El Pinto   A gracious adobe hacienda, dating to the 1960s, El Pinto was created on this Albuquerque North Valley site by Jack and Consuelo (Connie) Thomas. Connie is related to the Griggs branch of the La Posta de Mesilla family, through her grandmother Josephina Chavez-Griggs. Now in its 52nd year, El Pinto was really way outside of town when the Thomases launched a one-room café on the 12-acre property (it’s off the Tramway exit). Twin brothers Jim and John Thomas grew up here from the time they were toddlers, and took the reins from their parents in 1989. They created a garden room that brings the outside in, but when the weather’s right, five patios offer striking settings, and lots of wide views of the Sandías.   Jim Thomas claims that his family was the first to differentiate the state’s red-andgreen- chile specialties as “New Mexican” rather than Mexican. “My mother’s grandmother was a Mexican citizen, and she insisted there was nothing Mexican about the local fare. She was right. To this day, we avoid dishes that come from elsewhere, like Tex-Mex fajitas.” El Pinto’s bestsellers are the traditional chicken enchiladas, made with antibiotic- and hormone-free poultry, and the #3 combination plate, with rolled enchilada (Jim has his red, beef, and hot), rolled taco, chile relleno, pork chile con carne, and Colorado pintos. Both the red and green chile are grown pesticide- and herbicide-free near Hatch. This past summer, the twins began growing heirloom tomatoes for salads and salsa, and a greenhouse is under construction so they can grow greens and some vegetables year-round. They send their food scraps to a vermiculture (worm) farm, which then returns the rich worm castings to the restaurant for the garden soil. Jim tells me that they are now sourcing non-GMO corn for their chips and tortillas. Finding unmodified corn has become increasingly an issue here in the United States, so El Pinto’s corn now comes from Mexico. Horno pig roasts, monthly spring through fall, have become a new tradition. Roasts are planned for Easter, Memorial Day, and the Fourth of July, in particular. The hogs come from Kyzer Farms, on the southern edge of Albuquerque. El Pinto’s bar currently offers New Mexico’s largest selection of tequila, some 168 different choices. Guests can opt for a handmade margarita, a flight of three tequilas with a traditional southof- the-border chaser of citrusy sangrita (a blend of citrus, chile, and tomato, the traditional accompaniment sipped alongside straight tequila in Mexico), or a shot or snifter of super-premium tequila. A big salud to the Thomas twins. 10500 4th Street NW, Albuquerque; (505) 898-1771; elpinto.com Rancho de Chimayó   Turning 50 in 2015, Rancho de Chimayó ranks as the youngster in this collection of culinary landmarks. However, what’s astonishing here is that founder Florence Jaramillo continues to helm the restaurant, as she has since day one. Actually, it’s not so astonishing if you’ve ever met the energetic Florence, known to virtually everyone as Mrs. J. Equally noteworthy is that Florence, with her then husband Arturo, created the restaurant in Arturo’s ancestral family home, to help preserve the local culture and way of life they saw was becoming endangered in the 1960s.   When a fire nearly destroyed the rustic but genteel hacienda in 2008, Florence determined immediately that she and the staff would bring the restaurant back to life. The village’s economic and cultural life were too intertwined with the landmark to do anything else. Hundreds of area residents helped with various tasks, including the mud replastering of the exterior. It took nearly two years. The kitchen was revamped completely, but everything else was restored to its former historic appearance. When the Rancho reopened, the food was perhaps even better than it had been previously. It’s been a personal honor for me to have worked with Mrs. J. and her daughter Laura on the restaurant’s original cookbook, The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: The Traditional Cooking of New Mexico, published back in 1991, and again on a brandnew book, the 50th anniversary edition, which will be released in June. It includes Chimayó classics like the signature carne adovada, made with genuine Chimayó red pods, of course. The book also includes a number of new recipes, especially breakfast dishes, now that the restaurant serves the morning meal on weekends. Mrs. J. says, “ New Mexico Magazine ’s early coverage of the restaurant helped us get our start.” And she’d love for the magazine’s readers to come to the kickoff party celebrating the new Rancho de Chimayó cookbook, and the restaurant’s 50th anniversary events, on Saturday afternoon, June 21. Check the restaurant’s website for the specific time and details. 300 Juan Medina Road, Chimayó; (505) 351-4444; ranchodechimayo.com Recipes These recipes are from the upcoming The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition , by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison (© 2014, Lyons Press, an imprint of Globe Pequot Press). The three can make the basis for an Easter breakfast or brunch with a platter of fruit and a festive beverage. Try the pancakes for supper, the tortas for lunch, or the bread pudding (online at mynm.us/414recipe) as a dessert with any meal. Blue Corn Pancakes   Along with the especially nutty blue cornmeal itself, the generous amount of vanilla extract is the secret to Rancho de Chimayó’s tender raised cakes. The restaurant staff makes plate-size pancakes, but you may prefer to make smaller ones.   Serves 4 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons blue cornmeal, preferably, or other cornmeal 1 cup all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder Pinch of salt 2 large eggs ¾ cup half-and-half ¾ cup milk 3 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract Canola or vegetable oil for frying Butter and warm maple syrup Stir together in a large bowl the cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Whisk in eggs, half-and-half, milk, oil, and vanilla. Let batter sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Alternatively, cover batter and refrigerate it overnight. Warm a griddle, preferably, or a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Pour a thin film of oil on griddle. Pour or spoon out batter onto hot griddle, where it should sizzle and hiss. A generous 3 tablespoons of batter will make a 4- to 5-inch pancake. Make as many cakes as you can fit on the surface without crowding. Flip pancakes just once, after 1 to 2 minutes, when their top surface is covered with tiny bubbles but before all bubbles pop. Pancakes are done when second side is golden brown, an additional 1 to 2 minutes. Repeat with remaining batter, adding a bit more oil to griddle as needed. Serve pancakes immediately, accompanied by butter and syrup. The pancakes absorb more of both toppings than cakes made with regular flour, so plan on being generous with their use. Tortas de Huevos Tradicionales (Egg Patties) Ahead-of-time note: Up to an hour ahead, the egg whites and yolks can be prepared to the point just before they are combined. Keep both bowls chilled until ready to use. High-altitude note: At 6,500 to 7,000 feet, the batter will rise more easily, so less leavening is needed. Use just a pinch of baking powder and fry between 360˚F and 365˚F. At altitudes between 2,500 and 6,500 feet, adjust the baking powder and temperature accordingly. Don’t let the lack of familiarity or the simplicity of this dish cause you to pass it by. Also, don’t confuse it with Mexican tortas, which are typically sandwiches. These light, crispy egg fritters are a Jaramillo family favorite. Steeped in tradition, the tortas are common in northern New Mexico households during Lent, when meat is avoided. The tortas also appear on Easter menus because of eggs’ association with new life. Serves 2 to 3 as a main dish, 4 to 5 as a side dish 3 large eggs 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour Scant ¼ teaspoon baking powder Pinch of salt or more to taste Canola or vegetable oil for frying, to a depth of 1 inch 2 to 3 cups Red Chile Sauce (recipe at mynm.us/414recipe ) Separate eggs, dropping whites into a medium-size non-plastic mixing bowl and placing yolks in a small bowl. Mix yolks lightly with a fork or whisk. Stir in flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside. Beat egg whites with a mixer at high speed until stiff. Gently fold egg yolk mixture into egg whites. Lay several thicknesses of paper towels near the stove. In a heavy skillet, heat oil to 375˚ F. Scoop up a large spoonful of the batter and drop it gently into oil. Within seconds it should puff up by 50 percent or more into a torta or patty. Turn patty at least once to cook evenly and fry until deep golden brown. It will be fragile but crisp. Remove first torta with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. Cut into patty to see if it is cooked through but has a melting tenderness. The interior should not be dry. Adjust oil temperature if necessary. Drop in remaining batter, several large spoonfuls at a time. Don’t crowd tortas as they cook. Repeat until all batter is used. Transfer tortas to a platter or plates and surround with chile sauce. Serve immediately. Cheryl Alters Jamison is New Mexico Magazine’s contributing culinary editor. Read her blog at nmmagazine.com/tastingnm. See more of Douglas Merriam‘s work at douglasmerriam.com. Preorder The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition from the New Mexico Magazine Store (books ship in late April) at shopnm.co/ChimayoCookbook .","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f965","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/tasting-nm-85307/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/tasting-nm-85307/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/tasting-nm-85307/","metaTitle":"Food for the Soul","metaDescription":"

In the restaurant world, “new” always grabs headlines. Vintage dining establishments, though, can build on their classic character, day after day, decade upon decade, and show the arrivistes that

","cleanDescription":"  In the restaurant world, “new” always grabs headlines. Vintage dining establishments, though, can build on their classic character, day after day, decade upon decade, and show the arrivistes that aged doesn’t mean outmoded. La Posta de Mesilla (near Las Cruces), El Pinto (in Albuquerque’s North Valley), and Rancho de Chimayó (north of Santa Fe) are so well known and beloved that the owners of any one of them could have kicked back and continued to watch guests trail through the doors for decades to come. But all of them have invested heavily in the beauty of their surroundings, in the importance of their homegrown staffs, and in their support of local suppliers. All serve New Mexican cuisine in its red and green glory, staying true to tradition while continuing to upgrade the quality of their ingredients. These venerable culinary landmarks, with a total of 175 deeply rooted years in the restaurant business, are honored with places on the New Mexico Tourism Department’s Culinary Treasures Trail ( mynm.us/nmculinary ). La Posta de Mesilla     Exuberance abounds here, on the plate as well as in the surroundings. It starts when you enter the lobby, flourishing with tropical foliage, aquariums, some lively parrots, and a toucan named Tiki.   In preparation for this year’s 75th anniversary year, owners Jerean Camuñez Hutchinson (the founder’s great-niece) and her husband, Tom, have expanded into a half-dozen new spaces within the storied original adobe structure. The building dates to the earliest days of Mesilla, when settlers began moving there after the conclusion of the war with Mexico in 1848. Now on the National Register of Historic Places, it served as an important stop of the Butterfield Stage Line and later the distinguished Corn Exchange Hotel. La Posta’s legend started in 1939, when 19-year-old Katy Griggs Camuñez Meek announced to her family that she was going to open a restaurant. That she knew nothing about the business, or any business, was no hindrance to can-do Katy. She bought a corner of the rambling adobe (now the Banquet Room) from her uncle for $1 and convinced her mother to cook the family recipes for a fourtable “chile joint” with no running water. It became a smashing success. Katy was an absolute charmer, an ebullient hostess and waitress who welcomed everyone. She delighted in making risqué quips that Jerean says could make a salty old sailor blush. The Hutchinsons’ newly remodeled rooms include Katy’s Blue Room. Once the founder’s bedroom, it may be my new favorite among the dining spaces. The original wood floor remains in place, as uneven as ever and a charming contrast to the lapis walls. Nearby, the Fiesta Room was once a part of the historic Fountain Theatre, which still operates next door. Everything about the room exclaims antiquity—the hefty hand-carved wooden doors, the two-footthick adobe walls, the 700-pound vigas that span the ceiling. The Corn Exchange Cantina holds what was Katy’s favorite table; her portrait now hangs there. The intricate stained-glass window behind the bar shows a stagecoach descending from the Organ Mountains into Mesilla. As if these and the other festive dining rooms don’t give guests enough seating options, there’s now the additional opportunity to eat outdoors in an enclosed patio under the shade of a pecan tree. Jerean smiles as she talks about the new Adobe Cantina y Tequileria, a central gathering spot. She opts for the “La Patrona” margarita, with 100 percent blue agave Patrón Añejo tequila, Cointreau, and freshly squeezed lime juice, but the options are pretty much unlimited. For those who prefer their libation straight, Herradura now makes a special-reserve La Posta tequila, served here from the barrel. Since the beginning, one of the restaurant’s most popular dishes has been Katy’s original tostadas compuestas. I love these cupped corn tortillas overflowing with frijoles, red chile con carne, and bright garnishes. Among the green chile dishes, always made with Mesilla Valley peppers, locals opt most often for the sour cream enchiladas. Jerean and Tom have added shrimp ceviche, fajitas, and serious charbroiled steaks to the menu more recently. La Posta now serves breakfast on weekends. Jerean emphasizes that they purchase many of their products locally. “The honey we serve with our sopaipillas comes from local bees, so you’re tasting the flowers of the Mesilla Valley.” Sweet indeed. 2410 Calle de San Albino, Mesilla; (575) 524-3524; laposta-de-mesilla.com El Pinto   A gracious adobe hacienda, dating to the 1960s, El Pinto was created on this Albuquerque North Valley site by Jack and Consuelo (Connie) Thomas. Connie is related to the Griggs branch of the La Posta de Mesilla family, through her grandmother Josephina Chavez-Griggs. Now in its 52nd year, El Pinto was really way outside of town when the Thomases launched a one-room café on the 12-acre property (it’s off the Tramway exit). Twin brothers Jim and John Thomas grew up here from the time they were toddlers, and took the reins from their parents in 1989. They created a garden room that brings the outside in, but when the weather’s right, five patios offer striking settings, and lots of wide views of the Sandías.   Jim Thomas claims that his family was the first to differentiate the state’s red-andgreen- chile specialties as “New Mexican” rather than Mexican. “My mother’s grandmother was a Mexican citizen, and she insisted there was nothing Mexican about the local fare. She was right. To this day, we avoid dishes that come from elsewhere, like Tex-Mex fajitas.” El Pinto’s bestsellers are the traditional chicken enchiladas, made with antibiotic- and hormone-free poultry, and the #3 combination plate, with rolled enchilada (Jim has his red, beef, and hot), rolled taco, chile relleno, pork chile con carne, and Colorado pintos. Both the red and green chile are grown pesticide- and herbicide-free near Hatch. This past summer, the twins began growing heirloom tomatoes for salads and salsa, and a greenhouse is under construction so they can grow greens and some vegetables year-round. They send their food scraps to a vermiculture (worm) farm, which then returns the rich worm castings to the restaurant for the garden soil. Jim tells me that they are now sourcing non-GMO corn for their chips and tortillas. Finding unmodified corn has become increasingly an issue here in the United States, so El Pinto’s corn now comes from Mexico. Horno pig roasts, monthly spring through fall, have become a new tradition. Roasts are planned for Easter, Memorial Day, and the Fourth of July, in particular. The hogs come from Kyzer Farms, on the southern edge of Albuquerque. El Pinto’s bar currently offers New Mexico’s largest selection of tequila, some 168 different choices. Guests can opt for a handmade margarita, a flight of three tequilas with a traditional southof- the-border chaser of citrusy sangrita (a blend of citrus, chile, and tomato, the traditional accompaniment sipped alongside straight tequila in Mexico), or a shot or snifter of super-premium tequila. A big salud to the Thomas twins. 10500 4th Street NW, Albuquerque; (505) 898-1771; elpinto.com Rancho de Chimayó   Turning 50 in 2015, Rancho de Chimayó ranks as the youngster in this collection of culinary landmarks. However, what’s astonishing here is that founder Florence Jaramillo continues to helm the restaurant, as she has since day one. Actually, it’s not so astonishing if you’ve ever met the energetic Florence, known to virtually everyone as Mrs. J. Equally noteworthy is that Florence, with her then husband Arturo, created the restaurant in Arturo’s ancestral family home, to help preserve the local culture and way of life they saw was becoming endangered in the 1960s.   When a fire nearly destroyed the rustic but genteel hacienda in 2008, Florence determined immediately that she and the staff would bring the restaurant back to life. The village’s economic and cultural life were too intertwined with the landmark to do anything else. Hundreds of area residents helped with various tasks, including the mud replastering of the exterior. It took nearly two years. The kitchen was revamped completely, but everything else was restored to its former historic appearance. When the Rancho reopened, the food was perhaps even better than it had been previously. It’s been a personal honor for me to have worked with Mrs. J. and her daughter Laura on the restaurant’s original cookbook, The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: The Traditional Cooking of New Mexico, published back in 1991, and again on a brandnew book, the 50th anniversary edition, which will be released in June. It includes Chimayó classics like the signature carne adovada, made with genuine Chimayó red pods, of course. The book also includes a number of new recipes, especially breakfast dishes, now that the restaurant serves the morning meal on weekends. Mrs. J. says, “ New Mexico Magazine ’s early coverage of the restaurant helped us get our start.” And she’d love for the magazine’s readers to come to the kickoff party celebrating the new Rancho de Chimayó cookbook, and the restaurant’s 50th anniversary events, on Saturday afternoon, June 21. Check the restaurant’s website for the specific time and details. 300 Juan Medina Road, Chimayó; (505) 351-4444; ranchodechimayo.com Recipes These recipes are from the upcoming The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition , by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison (© 2014, Lyons Press, an imprint of Globe Pequot Press). The three can make the basis for an Easter breakfast or brunch with a platter of fruit and a festive beverage. Try the pancakes for supper, the tortas for lunch, or the bread pudding (online at mynm.us/414recipe) as a dessert with any meal. Blue Corn Pancakes   Along with the especially nutty blue cornmeal itself, the generous amount of vanilla extract is the secret to Rancho de Chimayó’s tender raised cakes. The restaurant staff makes plate-size pancakes, but you may prefer to make smaller ones.   Serves 4 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons blue cornmeal, preferably, or other cornmeal 1 cup all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder Pinch of salt 2 large eggs ¾ cup half-and-half ¾ cup milk 3 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract Canola or vegetable oil for frying Butter and warm maple syrup Stir together in a large bowl the cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Whisk in eggs, half-and-half, milk, oil, and vanilla. Let batter sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Alternatively, cover batter and refrigerate it overnight. Warm a griddle, preferably, or a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Pour a thin film of oil on griddle. Pour or spoon out batter onto hot griddle, where it should sizzle and hiss. A generous 3 tablespoons of batter will make a 4- to 5-inch pancake. Make as many cakes as you can fit on the surface without crowding. Flip pancakes just once, after 1 to 2 minutes, when their top surface is covered with tiny bubbles but before all bubbles pop. Pancakes are done when second side is golden brown, an additional 1 to 2 minutes. Repeat with remaining batter, adding a bit more oil to griddle as needed. Serve pancakes immediately, accompanied by butter and syrup. The pancakes absorb more of both toppings than cakes made with regular flour, so plan on being generous with their use. Tortas de Huevos Tradicionales (Egg Patties) Ahead-of-time note: Up to an hour ahead, the egg whites and yolks can be prepared to the point just before they are combined. Keep both bowls chilled until ready to use. High-altitude note: At 6,500 to 7,000 feet, the batter will rise more easily, so less leavening is needed. Use just a pinch of baking powder and fry between 360˚F and 365˚F. At altitudes between 2,500 and 6,500 feet, adjust the baking powder and temperature accordingly. Don’t let the lack of familiarity or the simplicity of this dish cause you to pass it by. Also, don’t confuse it with Mexican tortas, which are typically sandwiches. These light, crispy egg fritters are a Jaramillo family favorite. Steeped in tradition, the tortas are common in northern New Mexico households during Lent, when meat is avoided. The tortas also appear on Easter menus because of eggs’ association with new life. Serves 2 to 3 as a main dish, 4 to 5 as a side dish 3 large eggs 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour Scant ¼ teaspoon baking powder Pinch of salt or more to taste Canola or vegetable oil for frying, to a depth of 1 inch 2 to 3 cups Red Chile Sauce (recipe at mynm.us/414recipe ) Separate eggs, dropping whites into a medium-size non-plastic mixing bowl and placing yolks in a small bowl. Mix yolks lightly with a fork or whisk. Stir in flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside. Beat egg whites with a mixer at high speed until stiff. Gently fold egg yolk mixture into egg whites. Lay several thicknesses of paper towels near the stove. In a heavy skillet, heat oil to 375˚ F. Scoop up a large spoonful of the batter and drop it gently into oil. Within seconds it should puff up by 50 percent or more into a torta or patty. Turn patty at least once to cook evenly and fry until deep golden brown. It will be fragile but crisp. Remove first torta with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. Cut into patty to see if it is cooked through but has a melting tenderness. The interior should not be dry. Adjust oil temperature if necessary. Drop in remaining batter, several large spoonfuls at a time. Don’t crowd tortas as they cook. Repeat until all batter is used. Transfer tortas to a platter or plates and surround with chile sauce. Serve immediately. Cheryl Alters Jamison is New Mexico Magazine’s contributing culinary editor. Read her blog at nmmagazine.com/tastingnm. See more of Douglas Merriam‘s work at douglasmerriam.com. Preorder The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: 50th Anniversary Edition from the New Mexico Magazine Store (books ship in late April) at shopnm.co/ChimayoCookbook .","publish_start_moment":"2014-03-21T14:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.474Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f964","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f1ae","title":"Breakfast Burrito Recipe","slug":"breakfast-burrito-web-extra-85292","image_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4d8","publish_start":"2014-03-20T16:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f333","58b4b2404c2774661570f274"],"tags_ids":["59090e4ce1efff4c9916fb3b","59090c2de1efff4c9916f9d2"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"Courtesy Newmexico.org","custom_tagline":"This New Mexico favorite will open your eyes and get you moving in the morning.","created":"2014-03-20T16:12:40.000Z","legacy_id":"85292","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"breakfast burrito recipe","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.630Z","active":true,"description_raw":"

Smothered Breakfast Burritos

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Here’s the classic plated New Mexico morning eye opener. If you’d like for the burritos to be in the also-popular on-the-run handheld style, make a few modifications. Use about half of the amount of filling called for here, but add a spoonful or two of either chopped green chile or prepared green chile sauce, warmed, to each burrito’s filling mixture. Top the filling with a similar amount of cheese too. Then fold one end of a tortilla up and over about one inch of filling, and roll up the burrito into a snug cylinder. Wrap the folded-up end in wax paper or with a thick napkin to secure. Repeat. Eat.

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Serves 4 generously

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    \r\n\t
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • \r\n\t
  • 3 large russet potatoes, peeled or unpeeled, shredded on the large holes of a box grater or in a food processor
  • \r\n\t
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • \r\n\t
  • Fresh-ground black pepper to taste
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • \r\n\t
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten, optional
  • \r\n\t
  • 4 large flour tortillas, warmed
  • \r\n\t
  • 8 slices bacon, cooked until crisp
  • \r\n\t
  • 3 to 4 cups green chile sauce, warmed (below)
  • \r\n\t
  • 6 to 8 ounces mild cheddar cheese, grated
  • \r\n
\r\n\r\n

 

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1. Preheat the oven to 400° F.

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2. Warm the oil in a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Stir in the potatoes, salt, and as much pepper as you wish. Pat the mixture down evenly, cook several minutes. Scrape it up from the bottom of the skillet, add the onion and garlic, and pat back down again. Repeat the process until the potatoes are cooked through and golden brown, with many crisp edges, about 12 to 15 minutes. If you are including eggs, pour them over the potatoes and scrape the mixture up and down another couple of times to distribute and cook the eggs.

\r\n\r\n

3. Spoon one-fourth of the potatoes onto a tortilla. Top it with 2 slices of bacon. Roll up into a loose cylinder and place the burrito seam-side down on a heat-proof plate. Spoon one-fourth of the chile sauce over the burrito and sprinkle it generously with cheese. Repeat with the remaining ingredients.

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4. Bake the burritos until the cheese is melted and gooey, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately.

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Variations: Chicharrones, carnitas, chorizo, other sausage, beans, salsa, and bits of crunchy corn tortillas are just a few of the other ingredients that can be stuffed into a morning burrito. Use your imagination and follow your taste buds. Of course, a breakfast burrito can be covered in red chile too, if you wish.

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Green Chile Sauce

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Makes approximately 4 cups

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    \r\n\t
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • \r\n\t
  • ½ to 1 medium onion, chopped fine
  • \r\n\t
  • 2 to 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • \r\n\t
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • \r\n\t
  • 2 cups chopped roasted mild to medium-hot New Mexican green chile, fresh or thawed frozen
  • \r\n\t
  • 2 cups chicken or beef stock
  • \r\n\t
  • ½ teaspoon salt, or more to taste
  • \r\n
\r\n\r\n

 

\r\n\r\n

1. Warm the oil in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until the onion is soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in the flour and continue cooking for another 1 or 2 minutes. Mix in the chile. Immediately begin pouring in the stock, stirring as you go, then add the salt. Bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to a low simmer and cook for about 15 minutes, until thickened but still very pourable. Use warm or refrigerate for later use.

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From Tasting New Mexico © Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison, 2012 (Museum of New Mexico Press).

","teaser_raw":"

Smothered Breakfast Burritos

Here’s the classic plated New Mexico morning eye opener. If you’d like for the burritos to be in the also-popular on-the-run handheld style, make a few modifications. Use

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Smothered Breakfast Burritos

Here’s the classic plated New Mexico morning eye opener. If you’d like for the burritos to be in the also-popular on-the-run handheld style, make a few modifications. Use

","description":"Smothered Breakfast Burritos Here’s the classic plated New Mexico morning eye opener. If you’d like for the burritos to be in the also-popular on-the-run handheld style, make a few modifications. Use about half of the amount of filling called for here, but add a spoonful or two of either chopped green chile or prepared green chile sauce, warmed, to each burrito’s filling mixture. Top the filling with a similar amount of cheese too. Then fold one end of a tortilla up and over about one inch of filling, and roll up the burrito into a snug cylinder. Wrap the folded-up end in wax paper or with a thick napkin to secure. Repeat. Eat. Serves 4 generously ¼ cup vegetable oil 3 large russet potatoes, peeled or unpeeled, shredded on the large holes of a box grater or in a food processor ½ teaspoon salt Fresh-ground black pepper to taste 1 medium onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 2 large eggs, lightly beaten, optional 4 large flour tortillas, warmed 8 slices bacon, cooked until crisp 3 to 4 cups green chile sauce, warmed (below) 6 to 8 ounces mild cheddar cheese, grated   1. Preheat the oven to 400° F. 2. Warm the oil in a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Stir in the potatoes, salt, and as much pepper as you wish. Pat the mixture down evenly, cook several minutes. Scrape it up from the bottom of the skillet, add the onion and garlic, and pat back down again. Repeat the process until the potatoes are cooked through and golden brown, with many crisp edges, about 12 to 15 minutes. If you are including eggs, pour them over the potatoes and scrape the mixture up and down another couple of times to distribute and cook the eggs. 3. Spoon one-fourth of the potatoes onto a tortilla. Top it with 2 slices of bacon. Roll up into a loose cylinder and place the burrito seam-side down on a heat-proof plate. Spoon one-fourth of the chile sauce over the burrito and sprinkle it generously with cheese. Repeat with the remaining ingredients. 4. Bake the burritos until the cheese is melted and gooey, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately. Variations: Chicharrones, carnitas, chorizo, other sausage, beans, salsa, and bits of crunchy corn tortillas are just a few of the other ingredients that can be stuffed into a morning burrito. Use your imagination and follow your taste buds. Of course, a breakfast burrito can be covered in red chile too, if you wish. Green Chile Sauce Makes approximately 4 cups 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ½ to 1 medium onion, chopped fine 2 to 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 2 cups chopped roasted mild to medium-hot New Mexican green chile, fresh or thawed frozen 2 cups chicken or beef stock ½ teaspoon salt, or more to taste   1. Warm the oil in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until the onion is soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in the flour and continue cooking for another 1 or 2 minutes. Mix in the chile. Immediately begin pouring in the stock, stirring as you go, then add the salt. Bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to a low simmer and cook for about 15 minutes, until thickened but still very pourable. Use warm or refrigerate for later use. From Tasting New Mexico © Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison, 2012 (Museum of New Mexico Press).","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f964","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/breakfast-burrito-web-extra-85292/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/breakfast-burrito-web-extra-85292/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/breakfast-burrito-web-extra-85292/","metaTitle":"Breakfast Burrito Recipe","metaDescription":"

Smothered Breakfast Burritos

Here’s the classic plated New Mexico morning eye opener. If you’d like for the burritos to be in the also-popular on-the-run handheld style, make a few modifications. Use

","cleanDescription":"Smothered Breakfast Burritos Here’s the classic plated New Mexico morning eye opener. If you’d like for the burritos to be in the also-popular on-the-run handheld style, make a few modifications. Use about half of the amount of filling called for here, but add a spoonful or two of either chopped green chile or prepared green chile sauce, warmed, to each burrito’s filling mixture. Top the filling with a similar amount of cheese too. Then fold one end of a tortilla up and over about one inch of filling, and roll up the burrito into a snug cylinder. Wrap the folded-up end in wax paper or with a thick napkin to secure. Repeat. Eat. Serves 4 generously ¼ cup vegetable oil 3 large russet potatoes, peeled or unpeeled, shredded on the large holes of a box grater or in a food processor ½ teaspoon salt Fresh-ground black pepper to taste 1 medium onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 2 large eggs, lightly beaten, optional 4 large flour tortillas, warmed 8 slices bacon, cooked until crisp 3 to 4 cups green chile sauce, warmed (below) 6 to 8 ounces mild cheddar cheese, grated   1. Preheat the oven to 400° F. 2. Warm the oil in a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Stir in the potatoes, salt, and as much pepper as you wish. Pat the mixture down evenly, cook several minutes. Scrape it up from the bottom of the skillet, add the onion and garlic, and pat back down again. Repeat the process until the potatoes are cooked through and golden brown, with many crisp edges, about 12 to 15 minutes. If you are including eggs, pour them over the potatoes and scrape the mixture up and down another couple of times to distribute and cook the eggs. 3. Spoon one-fourth of the potatoes onto a tortilla. Top it with 2 slices of bacon. Roll up into a loose cylinder and place the burrito seam-side down on a heat-proof plate. Spoon one-fourth of the chile sauce over the burrito and sprinkle it generously with cheese. Repeat with the remaining ingredients. 4. Bake the burritos until the cheese is melted and gooey, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately. Variations: Chicharrones, carnitas, chorizo, other sausage, beans, salsa, and bits of crunchy corn tortillas are just a few of the other ingredients that can be stuffed into a morning burrito. Use your imagination and follow your taste buds. Of course, a breakfast burrito can be covered in red chile too, if you wish. Green Chile Sauce Makes approximately 4 cups 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ½ to 1 medium onion, chopped fine 2 to 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 2 cups chopped roasted mild to medium-hot New Mexican green chile, fresh or thawed frozen 2 cups chicken or beef stock ½ teaspoon salt, or more to taste   1. Warm the oil in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until the onion is soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in the flour and continue cooking for another 1 or 2 minutes. Mix in the chile. Immediately begin pouring in the stock, stirring as you go, then add the salt. Bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to a low simmer and cook for about 15 minutes, until thickened but still very pourable. Use warm or refrigerate for later use. From Tasting New Mexico © Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison, 2012 (Museum of New Mexico Press).","publish_start_moment":"2014-03-20T16:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.474Z"},{"_id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f963","author_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f249","title":"One of Our 50 Is Found!","slug":"one-of-our-50-is-found-85289","image_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4e1","publish_start":"2014-03-20T15:00:00.000Z","enable_comments":true,"categories_ids":["58b4b2404c2774661570f274","58b4b2404c2774661570f266"],"tags_ids":["59090c2de1efff4c9916f9d2","59090c0be1efff4c9916f953"],"cms_tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"enabled":true,"custom_photo_credit":"User Submitted","custom_tagline":"A-HA! Moments when our readers realized that New Mexico was the place for them.","created":"2014-03-20T15:48:07.000Z","legacy_id":"85289","blog":"magazine","_title_sort":"one of our 50 is found!","updated":"2017-10-31T21:31:31.615Z","active":true,"description_raw":"
\"Elizardo\"Abiquiú Deputy Sheriff Elizardo “Lee” Maestas.
\r\n\r\n

SHOT TO THE HEART
\r\nAlthough my mother’s family is from New Mexico, I was born and raised in California. I’ve visited New Mexico many times, as a child and as an adult with my own family.
\r\n
\r\nIn Abiquiú during the 1920s, my grandfather, Elizardo “Lee” Maestas, was the deputy sheriff for several years. During this time, the family lived in the future home of the artist Georgia O’Keeffe.
\r\n
\r\nIn recent years, we traveled to Abiquiú and took a tour of the O’Keeffe home. We talked to a local resident who told us that some of the oldtimers remembered my grandfather as the best deputy sheriff that Abiquiú ever had. We even got to see the bullet holes my grandpa shot into the ceiling of the cantina to stop a barroom brawl. They are still there to this day, in honor of my grandfather.
\r\n
\r\nMy connection to New Mexico became even stronger as I stared at that ceiling, and since then, I’ve connected with my grandmother’s Velarde relatives on Facebook.
\r\nHelen Maestas Najera Reyes
\r\nMorgan Hill, CA

\r\n\r\n

COMING FULL CIRCLE
\r\nI was born and reared in New Mexico, and I grew up thinking it was everyone’s destiny to have bright blue skies every day, dramatic sunrises and sunsets to frame the day, horned toads to catch and tickle, mesas to roam in, the bosque to ride in, mountains in every vista, fall colors, the smell of roasting chile, and ignorance of racial prejudice. My wise parents insisted that my siblings and I go to another part of the country for college “to see how the other half lives,” so we could more deeply appreciate the Land of Enchantment.
\r\n
\r\nMy insatiable curiosity about places unknown led me all around the world. After living in North Carolina and Washington, D.C., I found myself living in London. One night, I was alone watching a television drama about the making of the atom bomb. The actors were shown in Los Alamos, other parts of the Jémez, Bandelier, and down toward San Ildefonso, Santa Fe, Albuquerque and, of course, White Sands. Somewhere along the line, I started to cry deep, wrenching sobs, and I could not stop. I missed my first love. I love the land. I love what my eyes see in New Mexico, and I am trying to make my way back for good. Is this true homesickness?
\r\nConnie (Katson) Bransilver
\r\nNaples, FL

\r\n\r\n

HAPPY TRAILS
\r\nIn the late ’80s, I came to Taos because Taos Ski Valley had the reputation as the best ski school with the most difficult terrain.
\r\n
\r\nMy “A-ha! I love New Mexico” moment occurred on a crystal-clear Thursday morning while skiing untracked powder down Lorelei with a ski school class led by instructor Jim Henderson. Jim’s knowledge and joy of skiing was contagious, and I subsequently fell in love with the Land of Enchantment. After more than 25 years exploring New Mexico, my wife and I intend to have our (now) good friend and extraordinary builder Jim Henderson build a home for us on land we acquired in Taos, so we can create more perfect moments such as listening to the bagpipe player on Sandía Peak; pretending to fly with our son through the dunes of White Sands; eating breakfast outdoors at the Bosque del Apache Festival of the Cranes; the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum; the margaritas at Doc Martin’s …
\r\nCharles Gill
\r\nSan Diego, CA

\r\n\r\n

THE POWER OF PRAYER
\r\nMy wife and I were exploring the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument one day when we rounded a corner of a cave and came upon two men talking. One was a park ranger, and the other a distinguished-looking gentleman with hair pulled back into a ponytail, wearing a T-shirt, shorts, and sandals. The man with the ponytail, Richard, asked my wife and me if we would join them in a prayer. Of course we said yes. When Richard started to pray, the breeze blew into the cave, and after he prayed in the four directions and said “Amen,” the breeze stopped. We came to find out that the ranger was half Native American, and Richard was Apache, the great-great-grandson of Geronimo’s medicine man. It was a life-changing experience that we will never forget.
\r\nRichard Rogers
\r\nBedford, TX

\r\n\r\n

HEIGHTENED CONSCIOUSNESS
\r\nMy husband and I vacationed in New Mexico for the first time this past summer, 2013, to celebrate his milestone birthday. We spent a week visiting Albuquerque and Santa Fe, and we planned an afternoon tour of Acoma Pueblo, atop the mesa. Given my intense, lifelong fear of heights, I was not looking forward to it. I tried to put my fears behind me for my husband’s sake. Much to my surprise, I felt my anxiety and fear of heights leave me while I was on top of the mesa with our group and tour guide. Our guide explained that Acoma was a place of peace and tranquillity, and I felt peaceful and serene while there. I was so relieved that I could enjoy the tour with my husband. I even walked right to the edge of the mesa and looked straight down without the usual butterflies in my stomach. Although my fears returned after leaving Acoma, I consider that to be the most A-ha! moment I could have ever had. I will always remember Acoma as my peaceful place and be grateful that it is the one and only spot where my fears disappeared.
\r\nAudrey Loera
\r\nNew Hope, PA

","teaser_raw":"
\"Elizardo\"Abiquiú Deputy Sheriff Elizardo “Lee” Maestas.

SHOT TO THE HEART
Although my mother’s family is from New Mexico, I was born and raised in California. I’ve visited New Mexico many times, as a child and

","version_id":"59f8ebb3648901d6cd725dfa","author":{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f249","name":"The Staff","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.420Z","blog":"magazine","_name_sort":"the staff","updated":"2017-03-15T20:35:50.490Z","_totalPosts":77,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f249","title":"The Staff","slug":"the-staff","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/the-staff/58b4b2404c2774661570f249/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/author/the-staff/58b4b2404c2774661570f249/#comments","totalPosts":77},"categories":[{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","blog":"magazine","title":"April 2014","_title_sort":"april 2014","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.491Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.498Z","_totalPosts":16,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f274","slug":"april-2014","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/april-2014/58b4b2404c2774661570f274/#comments","totalPosts":16},{"_id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f266","blog":"magazine","title":"50 Found","_title_sort":"50 found","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.490Z","created":"2017-02-27T23:12:00.495Z","_totalPosts":14,"id":"58b4b2404c2774661570f266","slug":"50-found","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/50-found/58b4b2404c2774661570f266/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/category/50-found/58b4b2404c2774661570f266/#comments","totalPosts":14}],"image":{"_id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4e1","legacy_id":"85359","title":"One of Our Fifty is Found!","created":"2014-03-24T14:54:02.000Z","updated":"2017-02-27T23:12:08.405Z","credits":"Henry Lopez","content_owner":"magazine","tags_ids":["58b061ec6a2b0936c34a23ea"],"title_sort":"one of our fifty is found!","resource_raw":{"public_id":"clients/newmexico/revised_found_solicit_c77c5d2e-e7b3-42e8-9d1a-28255e915830","version":1488237128,"signature":"fcd7575f1cd59247b038b8bffdbbadc7bee51821","width":490,"height":234,"format":"jpg","resource_type":"image","created_at":"2017-02-27T23:12:08.000Z","bytes":37707,"type":"upload","etag":"34f73a51ba0f1122f901b49669325eb8","url":"http://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237128/clients/newmexico/revised_found_solicit_c77c5d2e-e7b3-42e8-9d1a-28255e915830.jpg","secure_url":"https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1488237128/clients/newmexico/revised_found_solicit_c77c5d2e-e7b3-42e8-9d1a-28255e915830.jpg","original_filename":"revised-found-solicit"},"deleted":false,"id":"58b4b2494c2774661570f4e1","type":"image","resource":{"raw":{"resource_type":"image","format":"jpg","public_id":"clients/newmexico/revised_found_solicit_c77c5d2e-e7b3-42e8-9d1a-28255e915830"}},"inAssetRequest":false,"alt_text":"One of Our Fifty is Found!"},"teaser":"
\"Elizardo\"Abiquiú Deputy Sheriff Elizardo “Lee” Maestas.

SHOT TO THE HEART
Although my mother’s family is from New Mexico, I was born and raised in California. I’ve visited New Mexico many times, as a child and

","description":"Abiquiú Deputy Sheriff Elizardo “Lee” Maestas. SHOT TO THE HEART Although my mother’s family is from New Mexico, I was born and raised in California. I’ve visited New Mexico many times, as a child and as an adult with my own family. In Abiquiú during the 1920s, my grandfather, Elizardo “Lee” Maestas, was the deputy sheriff for several years. During this time, the family lived in the future home of the artist Georgia O’Keeffe. In recent years, we traveled to Abiquiú and took a tour of the O’Keeffe home. We talked to a local resident who told us that some of the oldtimers remembered my grandfather as the best deputy sheriff that Abiquiú ever had. We even got to see the bullet holes my grandpa shot into the ceiling of the cantina to stop a barroom brawl. They are still there to this day, in honor of my grandfather. My connection to New Mexico became even stronger as I stared at that ceiling, and since then, I’ve connected with my grandmother’s Velarde relatives on Facebook. Helen Maestas Najera Reyes Morgan Hill, CA COMING FULL CIRCLE I was born and reared in New Mexico, and I grew up thinking it was everyone’s destiny to have bright blue skies every day, dramatic sunrises and sunsets to frame the day, horned toads to catch and tickle, mesas to roam in, the bosque to ride in, mountains in every vista, fall colors, the smell of roasting chile, and ignorance of racial prejudice. My wise parents insisted that my siblings and I go to another part of the country for college “to see how the other half lives,” so we could more deeply appreciate the Land of Enchantment. My insatiable curiosity about places unknown led me all around the world. After living in North Carolina and Washington, D.C., I found myself living in London. One night, I was alone watching a television drama about the making of the atom bomb. The actors were shown in Los Alamos, other parts of the Jémez, Bandelier, and down toward San Ildefonso, Santa Fe, Albuquerque and, of course, White Sands. Somewhere along the line, I started to cry deep, wrenching sobs, and I could not stop. I missed my first love. I love the land. I love what my eyes see in New Mexico, and I am trying to make my way back for good. Is this true homesickness? Connie (Katson) Bransilver Naples, FL HAPPY TRAILS In the late ’80s, I came to Taos because Taos Ski Valley had the reputation as the best ski school with the most difficult terrain. My “A-ha! I love New Mexico” moment occurred on a crystal-clear Thursday morning while skiing untracked powder down Lorelei with a ski school class led by instructor Jim Henderson. Jim’s knowledge and joy of skiing was contagious, and I subsequently fell in love with the Land of Enchantment. After more than 25 years exploring New Mexico, my wife and I intend to have our (now) good friend and extraordinary builder Jim Henderson build a home for us on land we acquired in Taos, so we can create more perfect moments such as listening to the bagpipe player on Sandía Peak; pretending to fly with our son through the dunes of White Sands; eating breakfast outdoors at the Bosque del Apache Festival of the Cranes; the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum; the margaritas at Doc Martin’s … Charles Gill San Diego, CA THE POWER OF PRAYER My wife and I were exploring the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument one day when we rounded a corner of a cave and came upon two men talking. One was a park ranger, and the other a distinguished-looking gentleman with hair pulled back into a ponytail, wearing a T-shirt, shorts, and sandals. The man with the ponytail, Richard, asked my wife and me if we would join them in a prayer. Of course we said yes. When Richard started to pray, the breeze blew into the cave, and after he prayed in the four directions and said “Amen,” the breeze stopped. We came to find out that the ranger was half Native American, and Richard was Apache, the great-great-grandson of Geronimo’s medicine man. It was a life-changing experience that we will never forget. Richard Rogers Bedford, TX HEIGHTENED CONSCIOUSNESS My husband and I vacationed in New Mexico for the first time this past summer, 2013, to celebrate his milestone birthday. We spent a week visiting Albuquerque and Santa Fe, and we planned an afternoon tour of Acoma Pueblo, atop the mesa. Given my intense, lifelong fear of heights, I was not looking forward to it. I tried to put my fears behind me for my husband’s sake. Much to my surprise, I felt my anxiety and fear of heights leave me while I was on top of the mesa with our group and tour guide. Our guide explained that Acoma was a place of peace and tranquillity, and I felt peaceful and serene while there. I was so relieved that I could enjoy the tour with my husband. I even walked right to the edge of the mesa and looked straight down without the usual butterflies in my stomach. Although my fears returned after leaving Acoma, I consider that to be the most A-ha! moment I could have ever had. I will always remember Acoma as my peaceful place and be grateful that it is the one and only spot where my fears disappeared. Audrey Loera New Hope, PA","id":"58b4b2804c2774661570f963","url":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-found-85289/","commentsUrl":"/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-found-85289/#comments","absoluteUrl":"https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-found-85289/","metaTitle":"One of Our 50 Is Found!","metaDescription":"
\"Elizardo\"Abiquiú Deputy Sheriff Elizardo “Lee” Maestas.

SHOT TO THE HEART
Although my mother’s family is from New Mexico, I was born and raised in California. I’ve visited New Mexico many times, as a child and

","cleanDescription":"Abiquiú Deputy Sheriff Elizardo “Lee” Maestas. SHOT TO THE HEART Although my mother’s family is from New Mexico, I was born and raised in California. I’ve visited New Mexico many times, as a child and as an adult with my own family. In Abiquiú during the 1920s, my grandfather, Elizardo “Lee” Maestas, was the deputy sheriff for several years. During this time, the family lived in the future home of the artist Georgia O’Keeffe. In recent years, we traveled to Abiquiú and took a tour of the O’Keeffe home. We talked to a local resident who told us that some of the oldtimers remembered my grandfather as the best deputy sheriff that Abiquiú ever had. We even got to see the bullet holes my grandpa shot into the ceiling of the cantina to stop a barroom brawl. They are still there to this day, in honor of my grandfather. My connection to New Mexico became even stronger as I stared at that ceiling, and since then, I’ve connected with my grandmother’s Velarde relatives on Facebook. Helen Maestas Najera Reyes Morgan Hill, CA COMING FULL CIRCLE I was born and reared in New Mexico, and I grew up thinking it was everyone’s destiny to have bright blue skies every day, dramatic sunrises and sunsets to frame the day, horned toads to catch and tickle, mesas to roam in, the bosque to ride in, mountains in every vista, fall colors, the smell of roasting chile, and ignorance of racial prejudice. My wise parents insisted that my siblings and I go to another part of the country for college “to see how the other half lives,” so we could more deeply appreciate the Land of Enchantment. My insatiable curiosity about places unknown led me all around the world. After living in North Carolina and Washington, D.C., I found myself living in London. One night, I was alone watching a television drama about the making of the atom bomb. The actors were shown in Los Alamos, other parts of the Jémez, Bandelier, and down toward San Ildefonso, Santa Fe, Albuquerque and, of course, White Sands. Somewhere along the line, I started to cry deep, wrenching sobs, and I could not stop. I missed my first love. I love the land. I love what my eyes see in New Mexico, and I am trying to make my way back for good. Is this true homesickness? Connie (Katson) Bransilver Naples, FL HAPPY TRAILS In the late ’80s, I came to Taos because Taos Ski Valley had the reputation as the best ski school with the most difficult terrain. My “A-ha! I love New Mexico” moment occurred on a crystal-clear Thursday morning while skiing untracked powder down Lorelei with a ski school class led by instructor Jim Henderson. Jim’s knowledge and joy of skiing was contagious, and I subsequently fell in love with the Land of Enchantment. After more than 25 years exploring New Mexico, my wife and I intend to have our (now) good friend and extraordinary builder Jim Henderson build a home for us on land we acquired in Taos, so we can create more perfect moments such as listening to the bagpipe player on Sandía Peak; pretending to fly with our son through the dunes of White Sands; eating breakfast outdoors at the Bosque del Apache Festival of the Cranes; the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum; the margaritas at Doc Martin’s … Charles Gill San Diego, CA THE POWER OF PRAYER My wife and I were exploring the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument one day when we rounded a corner of a cave and came upon two men talking. One was a park ranger, and the other a distinguished-looking gentleman with hair pulled back into a ponytail, wearing a T-shirt, shorts, and sandals. The man with the ponytail, Richard, asked my wife and me if we would join them in a prayer. Of course we said yes. When Richard started to pray, the breeze blew into the cave, and after he prayed in the four directions and said “Amen,” the breeze stopped. We came to find out that the ranger was half Native American, and Richard was Apache, the great-great-grandson of Geronimo’s medicine man. It was a life-changing experience that we will never forget. Richard Rogers Bedford, TX HEIGHTENED CONSCIOUSNESS My husband and I vacationed in New Mexico for the first time this past summer, 2013, to celebrate his milestone birthday. We spent a week visiting Albuquerque and Santa Fe, and we planned an afternoon tour of Acoma Pueblo, atop the mesa. Given my intense, lifelong fear of heights, I was not looking forward to it. I tried to put my fears behind me for my husband’s sake. Much to my surprise, I felt my anxiety and fear of heights leave me while I was on top of the mesa with our group and tour guide. Our guide explained that Acoma was a place of peace and tranquillity, and I felt peaceful and serene while there. I was so relieved that I could enjoy the tour with my husband. I even walked right to the edge of the mesa and looked straight down without the usual butterflies in my stomach. Although my fears returned after leaving Acoma, I consider that to be the most A-ha! moment I could have ever had. I will always remember Acoma as my peaceful place and be grateful that it is the one and only spot where my fears disappeared. Audrey Loera New Hope, PA","publish_start_moment":"2014-03-20T15:00:00.000Z","publish_end_moment":"2017-12-16T22:08:41.475Z"}]});

Category - April 2014